Men's Clothing Store Insurance

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Men's Clothing Store Insurance Policy Information

Men's Clothing Store Insurance

Men's Clothing Store Insurance. The global men's apparel market is worth over US$483 billion, and this industry is valued at more than US $114 billion in the United States alone.

Although diverse types of retailers sell men's wear, dedicated men's apparel stores play a key part in this market, as a go-to destination for men looking to upgrade and refresh their casual, professional, and sports wardrobes.

Men's apparel stores can sell a variety of new and used clothing and accessories for men. A particular store may specialize in athletic wear, coats, hats, hosiery, suits, or ties.

Often jewelry, shirts, undergarments, wallets and other incidentals are available. The store may be independent or part of a regional or national chain that sells online as well as in stores.

Tailoring or alteration services may be provided. Some may offer delivery services.

As such, there is no question that those who own and manage men's apparel stores find themselves in a profitable branch of industry.

While the men's apparel market is only going to continue to grow, business owners can never be complacent. Men's apparel stores are not just wide open to plenty of opportunity, they also face numerous risks.

To protect your shop from the many perils it is vulnerable to, investing in the right insurance is absolutely necessary. What types of men's clothing store insurance are needed, though? Learn more in this brief guide.

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Below are some answers to commonly asked male apparel shops insurance questions:


How Much Does Men's Clothing Store Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small men's clothing stores ranges from $27 to $49 per month based on location, size, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do Men's Clothing Stores Need Insurance?

Men's Apparel

Men's apparel stores need to be insured, in the first place, because they face a multitude of industry-specific and universal risks.

While business owners will always hope that their companies will be able to dodge disaster, the reality is that any day could be one that results in devastating financial losses.

Men's apparel stores will, of course, be all too familiar with everyday risks such as theft and the sudden breakdown of important equipment. They could also be struck by larger-scale perils.

Acts of nature, like earthquakes, wildfires, or hurricanes, are one example. Large-scale theft, including cyber theft pertaining to your online store and employee fraud, are others.

Your business could, likewise, be burdened by lawsuits - anyone from customers or employees who may accidentally be injured on your premises or dissatisfied customers, to claims relating to potential copyright violations (even, for instance, relating to prints on t-shirts you may sell) may file a claim. Litigation is always time-consuming and costly, even if the claim is dismissed.

In addition to the fact that these and other perils would, without a comprehensive insurance plan, have the realistic potential to bankrupt your business, certain types of men's clothing store insurance are also compulsory. Besides, lenders will require proof of insurance before doing business with you.


What Type Of Insurance Do Men's Clothing Stores Need?

Although all men's apparel stores will have broadly similar insurance needs, business owners need to keep in mind that their precise insurance needs are dependent on the factors that make their business unique.

Your shop's location, size, number of employees, the range of goods you sell, and even the vendors you do business with all influence the types of coverage your store should have.

Because of that, men's apparel stores should always consult a competent commercial insurance broker. Meanwhile, these key types of men's clothing store insurance are essential include:

  • Commercial Property: This form of insurance defends you from financial losses caused by perils that inflict property damage - like acts of nature, accidents, theft, and vandalism. Your store building is protected alongside many of its contents.
  • General Liability: Designed to protect you if your store faces a third party property damage or bodily injury claim, this type of men's clothing store insurance coverage is an indispensable part of your legal defense fund. Attorney fees, court costs, and settlement payments can all be covered.
  • Product Liability: Should an item of clothing or an accessory that you have sold later cause injury to a third party, product liability coverage protects you from the financial fallout. In cases of product recall, it also helps you manage the costs.
  • Workers' Compensation: When an employee is injured on your premises, you can expect heavy expenses. Workers' compensation insurance pays for such employee's medical bills as well as reimbursing any lost wages while they are recovering.
  • Inland Marine: This form of insurance has your ordered goods covered while they in transit. Should an accident lead to the loss of your goods, for instance, the costs are covered by inland marine insurance.

Apparel shops will be protected from the most common risks when they invest in these types of coverage. Owners and managers should, however, be aware that they may also require other kinds of men's clothing store insurance. To find out more, talk to a competent commercial insurance broker.


Men's Clothing Store's Risks & Exposures

Menswear

Premises liability exposure is high due to the number of visitors to the store. To prevent slips and falls, there should be good lighting and adequate aisle space. All goods should be kept on easily reached clothing rods or shelves so customers do not pull items down on themselves. The stock dropped on floors by customers must be retrieved promptly.

Floor coverings must be in good condition with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked. Sufficient exits must be provided and be well marked, with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

If the business is open after dark, there should be adequate lighting and appropriate security for the area. There should be a disaster plan in place for unexpected emergencies.

Personal injury exposures include allegations of discrimination, invasion of privacy in dressing rooms, and from apprehending and detaining shoplifters, which may result in claims of assault and battery, false arrest or detention, unauthorized or intrusive searches, or wrongful ejection from the premises.

Shoplifting procedures must be fully understood and utilized by all employees.

Products liability exposure is normally low. Direct importing of clothes and tailoring can increase the exposure. Foreign-made items should come from a domestic-based wholesaler. Any direct importer should be considered as a product manufacturer.

Workers compensation exposure is moderate due to employees standing for long hours, the use of computers, and restocking which requires lifting and placing items on clothing rods or on shelves. Continual standing can result in musculoskeletal disorders of the back, legs, or feet.

Trips, slips, and falls are common. When work is done on computers, employees are exposed to eyestrain, neck strain, and repetitive motion injuries including carpal tunnel syndrome.

Lifting can cause back injury, hernias, sprains, and strains. Employees should be provided with safety equipment, trained on proper handling techniques, and have conveying devices available to assist with heavy lifting.

If tailoring services are offered, injuries due to sewing and cutting injuries are possible. Cleaning workers can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. In any retail business, hold-ups may occur. Employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner.

Property exposures are low because ignition sources are limited to electrical wiring and heating and cooling systems. These should be maintained and meet current codes for the occupancy. Should a fire occur the stock and its packaging materials provide a combustible fire load that is highly susceptible to water and smoke damage.

Individual items may be shoplifted. High-value or designer items may be stolen in larger quantities after hours. Appropriate security measures should be in place including physical barriers to prevent entrance to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Business interruption exposures are generally low as backup facilities are readily available.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities either from holdup or safe burglary. Background checks should be conducted on all employees handling money. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements.

Money should be regularly collected from cash drawers and moved away from the collection area, preferably to a safe on premises. Bank drops should be made throughout the day to prevent a buildup of cash on the premises.

Inland marine exposures are from accounts receivable if the store offers credit, computers to transact sales and monitor inventory, and valuable papers and records for customers', employees', and vendors' information. Backup copies of all records, including computer files, should be made and stored off premises.

If the store alters or repairs items for customers, there will be a bailees exposure. High-end stores may have fine arts such as paintings or sculpture. There may be goods in transit between stores or if the store delivers items.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired and non-owned for employees running errands. If the store delivers items to customers, only company vehicles should be used. Drivers must have a valid license and acceptable MVR. Vehicles must be regularly maintained with records kept.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 5611 Men's and Boys' Clothing and Accessory Stores
  • NAICS CODE: 448110 Men's Clothing Stores
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 11127, 11128
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 8008

Description for 5611: Men's and Boys' Clothing Stores

Division G: Retail Trade | Major Group 56: Apparel And Accessory Stores | Industry Group 561: Men's And Boys' Clothing And Accessory Stores

5611 Men's and Boys' Clothing and Accessory Stores: Establishments primarily engaged in the retail sale of men's and boys' ready-to-wear clothing and accessories.

  • Apparel accessory stores, men's and boys'-retail
  • Clothing stores, men's and boys'-retail
  • Haberdashery stores-retail
  • Hat stores, men's and boys'-retail
  • Men's wearing apparel-retail
  • Tie shops-retail

Men's Clothing Store Insurance - The Bottom Line

To protect your shop, employees and the customers, having the right men's clothing store insurance coverage is important. To see the policy options available to you, how much coverage you should invest in and the premiums - speak to a reputable commercial insurance broker.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources Retail Insurance

Read valuable small business retail insurance policy information. In a retail business, you need to have the right type of commercial insurance coverage so that your store, employees, and inventory are protected.


Retail Insurance

Retail stores are susceptible to premises liability claims because of customer traffic, but large department and specialty stores are more susceptible than most.

All retail stores have significant property exposures. The on-hand stock represents a considerable investment, but the amount on hand fluctuates seasonally. For this reason, physical damage insurance on this property must be arranged carefully. When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured's interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Crime insurance, in the form of employee theft and money and securities coverage, is also very important.

The businessowners policy was designed with retail exposures and operations in mind. For this reason alone, it should always be the first type of package coverage to consider. However, for those risks not eligible for the business owners policy program, the commercial package policy (CPP) is a practical and convenient way to combine a number of coverages into one policy.

Retail businesses generate income through interaction with customers. This interaction is also how a customer can sustain an injury and then sue the retailer for damages. Hazards, exposures and operations both on premises and off are important and must be covered, but liability the retailer may incur because of the merchandise sold must also be considered and insurance protection arranged.

Inventory or stock is the major property exposure for most retail operations. Because stock values tend to fluctuate or have significant peaks at certain times of the year, value reporting or peak season valuation options should be considered. Business income coverage, including business income from dependent properties coverage, may mean the difference between a retail operation staying in business or being forced into bankruptcy following a loss.

When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured’s interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Most retail businesses offer endless opportunities for a variety of criminal activities. For this reason, the coverages needed must be carefully evaluated. Holdup and robbery losses may be the most obvious concerns but employee theft, fraud and counterfeit money losses are also serious issues that cannot be dismissed.

Retail businesses are gaining greater exposure to international issues because of the growth in sales via the internet. As these sales increase, the added exposures faced by these retailers must be evaluated. While their operating horizons are expanding so are their potential loss exposures.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Bailees Customers, Goods in Transit, Jewelers Block, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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