Dry Cleaning Insurance (Quotes, Cost & Coverage)

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Frequently Asked Questions About
Commercial General Liability Insurance

How much does commercial insurance cost?

Costs can vary widely based on industry and are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. Request a free quote to get an exact number.

What kind of business insurance do I need?

Most business owners need General Liability Insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you will need workers compensation insurance too.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance is proof of coverage. It lists the type and amount of liability coverage you have and other policy information when a third party requests it.

Is business insurance tax deductible?

Yes. you can deduct the cost of commercial insurance premiums. The IRS considers insurance a cost of doing business as long it benefits the business & serves a business purpose.

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Dry Cleaning Insurance

Dry Cleaning Insurance

Dry Cleaning Insurance. If you own and operate a dry cleaner, then you should consider insurance to protect your business. Being the owner of a dry cleaning business means that you are exposed to lots of risks. One single lawsuit can cause you to lose everything you've worked so hard to build.

Dry cleaners use chemical applications instead of water to remove dirt, dust, and other debris from customers' clothing and other fabric items. These may include special fabrics that may be damaged by water, including leather goods and furs. Services may be provided to the general public or may be limited to commercial or institutional customers.

Depending on the type of customer and services offered, the operations may include pickup of soiled material (either from customers' premises or from owned drop-off stations), sorting, spot-cleaning (pretreatment for stains), laundering or dry-cleaning, pressing, and, delivery or return of the items to the customer. Special coatings, such as stain-proofing or waterproofing, may be applied during the cleaning process. Incidental repair work, such as sewing on buttons, may also be performed.

To protect yourself from the risks that come with operating this type of business, dry cleaning insurance is a good choice. Let's take a look at some of the different laundry service insurance policies that you can use to protect your business.

Dry cleaning insurance protects your laundry service from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

The Risks Of Operating A Dry Cleaners

Although it's important to get the best dryers and washers for your business you should also be concerned about the protection of your business. Every single day your business is faced with numerous risks. Some of these risks can cause financial damage to your business - dry cleaning insurance helps.

Running a dry cleaners and laundromat means you'll have lots of people on your premises at any given time. With more people using your services the risk of injury is a lot higher. Here are some of the risks you face while running this type of business:

  • Fires
  • Slips and falls on wet floors
  • Children playing and destroying equipment
  • Theft, vandalism and other crimes
  • Equipment breakdown
  • Floods and other weather events that damage your business

Commercial Insurance Policies For Laundromats & Dry Cleaners

With the amount of people using your services, there's a chance of injury while on your premises. Slips and falls are the most common risks you face. Having the right dry cleaning insurance gives you the protection you need when it happens. Following are some of the most common dry cleaning insurance coverages:

Commercial General Liability Insurance: If you need protection from customer injury or property damage then this is the insurance you must have for your business. When a customer slips and falls while using your services this is the best type of dry cleaning insurance to have. When you have this type of insurance you can assist with any medical costs associated with the injury.

Business Property Insurance: With this type of insurance you protect the buildings and the machines you use for the operation of your business. Equipment such as coin-operated washers, dryers, commercial laundry machines, dry cleaning machines and other equipment owned by your business will be covered by this insurance. Whether you are renting or you own a building to operate your business you must protect it with dry cleaning insurance.

Business Interruption Insurance: With business interruption insurance you protect your store when unexpected events happen that stops business operations. Any damage done to your business can cause you to lose income. This dry cleaning insurance allows for the reimbursement of any income losses and any other business expenses because of damage to your business. It's a good idea also to expand you business interruption coverage to cover utility interruptions as well.

Equipment Breakdown Insurance: This type of insurance provides coverage for when equipment breaks down in your business. When machinery breaks down you can lose income but when you have this insurance you can be reimbursed for the income you loss. You can never predict when something like this might happen which is why you need to be prepared by having this insurance.

Workers' Compensation: Workers comp is required in most states for any non-owner employees. This insurance allows you to provide assistance to an employee if they are injured and need medical attention. If an employee gets injured and the injury leads to death then this is insurance pays benefits to the surviving family of the victim.

Dry Cleaner's Risks & Exposures

Property exposures generally include a small office, drop off and pick up storefront, dry cleaning facilities, and perhaps a warehouse for storage. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, dry cleaning equipment, heating and air conditioning systems, and water heaters.

Flammables include the textiles or other fabrics to be cleaned, scrap materials, lint from dryers, and chemicals used in dry cleaning. At one time, the chemicals used were highly flammable, but most dry cleaners now use alternative chemical applications with less exposure to fire or explosion. One chemical is generally used to pretreat stains and another to clean. The spot cleaners tend to be the most flammable. Hazards increase without proper storage and handling methods.

Fire and explosion hazard may be severe unless there are dust collection systems and procedures for regular removal and disposal of scraps. Poor housekeeping is a serious fire hazard. Sprinklers may be advisable. Unless disposed of properly, greasy, oily rags (such as those used to clean the machinery) can cause a fire without a separate ignition source. Fuels, oils, and lubricants will increase the fire hazard if vehicles are stored and maintained on the premises.

Equipment breakdown exposures include breakdown losses to the dust collection and ventilation systems, laundering and dry cleaning equipment, electrical control panels, and other apparatus. Breakdown and loss of use of the water heaters, dry cleaning, and pressing machinery could result in a significant loss, both direct and under time element.

Crime exposure includes both employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities, particularly if there are numerous cash transactions, such as at drop-off points or collections by route drivers. Lack of control over pre-employment background screening, separation of duties, and reviews of procedures used at customers' premises increases the exposure.

All retail operations should have a monitoring and verification system to reconcile bills and receipts with services rendered. Holdup potential is high, especially in retail operations. Frequent deposits should be made, especially on high volume days.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable if the dry cleaner offers credit, bailees customers, computers, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. The bailees customers' exposure starts when the property is entrusted to a dry cleaner's employee and ends when the property is returned to the customer. The primary causes of loss are fire, theft, collision, overturn, and water damage. Hazards increase in the absence of adequate procedures, such as tagging or marking, to identify each customer's goods.

Premises liability exposure is very limited at the plant due to lack of public access. Any receiving areas should be in good condition and free from any tripping hazards. High concentrations of chemicals used in the cleaning process may be corrosive and/or toxic. Fumes, spills, or leaks may result in bodily injury or property damage to neighboring premises.

Off-site exposures are high as drivers interact with customers in the pickup and delivery operations. Personal injury exposures include assault and invasion of privacy. Failure of the cleaning service to run background checks and review references on employees both increases the hazard and reduces available defenses.

Completed operations liability exposure is low to moderate from items being damaged during the cleaning process, with the frequency being a greater concern than severity. Vapors, odors, and skin, eye, or lung irritants may result if chemicals are not properly removed from the item cleaned.

Environmental impairment liability exposure is high due to the potential for air, surface or groundwater, or soil contamination from the use and application of chemicals and detergents. The soil around the premises may be contaminated by disposal of chemicals used in the past. Disposal of perchloroethylene must adhere to EPA standards. The chemical is expensive but can be reclaimed and reused.

Workers compensation exposures can be high. Work may be performed under time constraints. Workers can experience lung, skin, or eye irritations and reactions to the dry cleaning chemicals, which may pose a long-term threat from cumulative exposure. Employees must be fully informed as to the potential effects of any chemicals, including long-term occupational disease hazards so that they can take action as quickly as possible.

Cuts and puncture wounds can result from sewing. Slips and falls can occur during cleaning at the dry cleaning facility, or at customers' premises. Back injuries while lifting or handling materials can occur, especially for employees engaged in pickup or delivery. Repetitive motion injuries can be reduced if workstations are ergonomically designed. Pets owned by customers may attack or bite workers.

Business auto exposure may be high if pickup and delivery services are provided. Deadlines placed on drivers increase the hazard. All drivers must have a valid driver's license and acceptable MVR. Vehicles must be regularly maintained and records kept at a central location. If vehicles are taken home, there should be written procedures regarding personal use by employees and their family members.

Dry Cleaning Insurance

When you are in the laundromat and dry cleaning business you face many risks. Having the right insurance for your business protects you when your business faces a lawsuit. Insurance can be the difference between losing everything in a lawsuit and keeping your business profitable.

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Small Business Economic Data & Insurance Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. Maybe you want to contribute to the economic growth of your community. Whatever the reason is, if you're thinking about starting a small business, it's important to understand pertinent information relating to small businesses in the United States; namely economic information and insurance regulations. After all, if you want your small business to succeed, you have to understand the economic trends organizations of a similar size in your area.

Likewise, you want to ensure that your small business is well protected with the right business insurance and that you are in compliance with the rules and regulations that pertain to commercial insurance in your region.

Small Business Information

Read up on economic statistics and insurance information that relates to small business owners in the United States.

Small Business Economic Data In The United States

Here's a look at some information that was compiled by the Small Business Association (SBA) regarding the economic data that pertains to small businesses in the United States:

  • In 2015, small businesses in the United States employed an estimated 58.9 million American workers, or 47.5 percent of the nation's private workforce.
  • Largest shares = fewer than 100 employees. The small businesses that employed 100 people or less had the largest share of employment amount small businesses.
  • Employment increased by nearly 2 percent. In 2018, employment amongst small businesses increased by 1.8 percent, which is an increase of 1 percent from the prior year.
  • Increase in proprietors. In 2016, the number of small business proprietors increased by 2.3 percent.
  • In 2015, small businesses were responsible for creating 1.9 million net jobs. Organizations that employed 20 people or less had the largest gains, as they added an estimated 1.1 million net jobs.
  • There were 5.7 million loans that were value less than $100,000 issued by lenders in the United States in 2016. These loans were issued under the Community Reinvestment Act.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the incorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $50,347 in 2016.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the unincorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $23,060 in 2016.
Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage. The SBA recommends the following insurance plans for small business owners:

  • Commercial Property Insurance: In the case of an unplanned disaster - fire, flood, vandalism, theft, etc. - this type of coverage will help you avoid paying for the damage out of your own pocket. Even if you rent the property, you should still carry commercial property insurance.
  • Commercial Liability Insurance: In the event that a legal situation arises - a negligence lawsuit, for example - commercial liability coverage will provide financial protection. It will cover the cost of legal defense fees, court fees, and even moneys that may be awarded.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: If you operate a vehicle for any activities that are related to your business - transporting and/or delivering goods, or meeting with clients - commercial auto insurance is legally required for businesses of all sizes, including small businesses.

Additional Resources For Retail Insurance

Read valuable small business retail insurance policy information. In a retail business, you need to have the right type of commercial insurance coverage so that your store, employees, and inventory are protected.


Retail Insurance

The businessowners policy was designed with retail exposures and operations in mind. For this reason alone, it should always be the first type of package coverage to consider. However, for those risks not eligible for the business owners policy program, the commercial package policy (CPP) is a practical and convenient way to combine a number of coverages into one policy.

Retail businesses generate income through interaction with customers. This interaction is also how a customer can sustain an injury and then sue the retailer for damages. Hazards, exposures and operations both on premises and off are important and must be covered, but liability the retailer may incur because of the merchandise sold must also be considered and insurance protection arranged.

Inventory or stock is the major property exposure for most retail operations. Because stock values tend to fluctuate or have significant peaks at certain times of the year, value reporting or peak season valuation options should be considered. Business income coverage, including business income from dependent properties coverage, may mean the difference between a retail operation staying in business or being forced into bankruptcy following a loss.

When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured’s interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Most retail businesses offer endless opportunities for a variety of criminal activities. For this reason, the coverages needed must be carefully evaluated. Holdup and robbery losses may be the most obvious concerns but employee theft, fraud and counterfeit money losses are also serious issues that cannot be dismissed.

Retail businesses are gaining greater exposure to international issues because of the growth in sales via the internet. As these sales increase, the added exposures faced by these retailers must be evaluated. While their operating horizons are expanding so are their potential loss exposures.



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Dry Cleaning Insurance
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Quotes from leading small business insurance carriers including: ACE, AmTrust, Chubb, Cincinnati, CNA, Colony, Employers, Evanston, Fireman's, Foremost, Guard, Hanover, Hiscox, Liberty Mutual, Markel, MSA, Nationwide, Penn America, Philadelphia, Prime, Progressive, Scottsdale, The Hartford, Travelers, USLI, Utica First, Western World, Zurich & others.

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