Inspection Bureau Insurance

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Inspection Bureau Insurance Policy Information

Inspection Bureau Insurance

Inspection Bureau Insurance. Inspection bureaus evaluate and assess compliance with standards, rules, or regulations relating to a specific type of industry and provide reports of their findings to their clients. Many industries need periodic independent reviews to assure compliance with known standards, rules, or regulations.

The inspection bureau may identify ways for them to improve compliance with standards, rules, or regulations. For example, an inspection may reveal workplace safety issues that need to be brought into compliance with OSHA regulations.

Inspections for insurance purposes, inspections of product safety controls, and inspections of the accuracy of machine calibrations may also be offered.

Regulation of inspectors, certification and educational requirements vary by state.

Inspection bureaus play a role in numerous different fields of industry and commerce, from construction to electricity providers, where they act as independent contractors. These businesses perform vital services and can be extremely successful.

inspection bureaus also, on the other hand, face a range of risks that could threaten their financial future, unless they have taken adequate steps to protect themselves.

How can investing in the right types of inspection bureau insurance help - and what kinds of coverage might be needed? For more information, keep reading.

Inspection bureau insurance protects your compliance assessment and evaluation business from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked inspection bureau insurance questions:


How Much Does Inspection Bureau Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small inspection bureaus ranges from $47 to $69 per month based on location, size, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do Inspection Bureaus Need Insurance?

Inspector At Work

Like companies in any other branch of commerce, inspection bureaus can be confronted with numerous perils that could negatively impact their financial outlook virtually overnight. Inspection bureaus have to consider both universal risks and hazards unique to their industry when they decide what types of insurance they may need.

Your office premises may, for instance, be struck by an act of nature, such as an earthquake, a wildfire, or a serious storm. Both your building and its contents could suffer extensive damage in the process, to the point where you may have to temporarily close your business. Theft, vandalism, and accidents are three further examples of perils that could cause serious property damage.

In addition, a client may allege that you missed something during an inspection. Especially if this alleged professional negligence is associated with serious harm, that could lead to time-consuming and financially-devastating litigation, whether or not your company did anything wrong. An employee may be injured during an inspection, or a client visiting your office could slip on a wet floor.

The list of perils that could cost you more than you can comfortably deal with on your own is almost endless. Thankfully, investing in a comprehensive inspection bureau insurance plan gives businesses in this industry the peace of mind that will allow them to focus on what they do best.


What Type Of Insurance Do Inspection Bureaus Need?

When it comes to insurance, there is no "one-size-fits-all" answer - the types of coverage inspection bureaus should carry depend on factors like the location where the business operates, the field of commerce it serves, the value of its equipment, and even its number of employees.

Because acquiring the right inspection bureau insurance can be complex, consulting a skilled commercial insurance broker who is deeply familiar with your line of work is essential. With that in mind, some of the types of inspection bureaus must have on their radar include:

  • Commercial Property - Despite all the measures you take to protect your commercial property from harm, perils like acts of nature, theft, and vandalism remain a threat. This form of insurance covers repair and replacement costs relating to your building as well as its contents.
  • Commercial General Liability - To defend yourself against bodily injury or property damage claims filed by third parties, this form of inspection bureau insurance is essential. It helps you cover attorney fees, settlement costs, and other related legal expenses.
  • Errors And Omissions - Inspection bureaus also need "E&O insurance", alternatively called professional liability insurance, to manage the costs associated with cases that you failed to carry your professional duties out as agreed. Once again, these policies will cover a significant portion of your legal fees in case of professional liability claims.
  • Workers Compensation - Should an employee suffer an occupational injury or illness, this form of insurance shoulders the cost of their medical bills, while also taking care of the income they lose while they are unable to work. Simultaneously, carrying workers' comp reduces the risk that employees will sue you.
  • Commercial Auto - Inspection bureaus will certainly rely on multiple professional vehicles to drive to client locations. If such a vehicle is involved in an accident or is stolen, commercial auto insurance shoulders the related costs.

To ensure that you are covered against all major threats, it remains important to talk to a trusted commercial insurance broker. That is because you may need additional forms of inspection bureau insurance coverage, depending on your individual risk profile.


Inspection Bureau's Risks & Exposures

Inspector With Client

Premises liability exposure may be limited at the firm's office due to lack of public access. If clients visit the premises, they must be confined to designated areas so they cannot view or overhear conversations regarding other clients' proprietary information.

To prevent slips, trips, or falls, all areas accessible to clients must be free of obstacles with floor coverings in good condition. The number of exits must be sufficient and well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. There should be a disaster plan for unexpected emergencies.

Off-site exposures are extensive as inspectors visit customers' premises and job sites, including access to sensitive areas. They may be involved with customers of the client to understand all aspects of the operations. There must be training, procedures, and policies regarding appropriate off-site conduct and methods of ensuring confidentiality.

Complaints about inspectors should be dealt with quickly. Personal injury liability exposures include allegations of assault, discrimination, and invasion of privacy.

Professional liability exposure is significant from rendering evaluations, opinions, findings, and results as ineffective advice or incorrect testing practices can result in substantial damage to property or injury to people. Customers can suffer financial loss if they must pay fines or cease operations due to a government order because of inspection-related issues.

The hazards increase if the firm fails to conduct thorough background checks to verify employees' training, background, and education, or if error checking procedures are ignored or are inadequate. Documentation must be clear, and testing procedures followed.

Other exposures include allegations of breach of a client's confidentiality or a conflict of interest.

Environmental impairment exposure may be a concern if samples are taken due to the potential for air, ground, or water contamination from the use of chemicals during the testing process. There must be a documented method of disposal for all items tested as well as disposal of solvents or acids used in testing protocols. Any disposal must adhere to all federal and state regulatory requirements.

Workers compensation exposure can be very high from office operations and off-site visits to customers' premises. Work done in the office is done on computers. Potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and similar cumulative trauma injuries that can be reduced with ergonomically designed workstations. Travel may be extensive.

Off-site exposures may include working at construction sites, at heights, on rough terrain, or in isolated areas. Inspectors may be exposed to a variety of chemicals and conditions. Back strains, hernias, and related injury can occur when lifting, obtaining samples or attempting to view processes.

Inspectors may be injured by trips and falls, falling objects, respiratory ailments from inhaling pollutants, dusts, or other allergens, foreign objects in the eye, hearing impairment from noise, assaults, attacks by unrestrained animals, or in vehicle or aviation accidents.

Since inspectors often work alone, injuries may go unnoticed, which can lead to delayed response and delayed first aid. Employees should have appropriate safety gear when working in laboratories or when visiting a job site.

Property exposure is primarily that of an office. Ignition sources include wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, wear, and overheating of equipment. There may be storage of client information in paper form, although these are now often digital instead of paper format. Storage of paper should be in fireproof cabinets.

Fire suppression systems must not damage the papers. If there is a testing laboratory on premises, such as facilities for the taking of samples to assure noise, air, water, or soil acceptability, chemicals must be separated from combustibles and stored in fireproof cabinets. Computers and other electronic equipment may be targets for theft.

Inland marine exposures consist of accounts receivable if the firm offers credit, computers, special floater, and valuable papers and records for contracts, research projects, and clients' information. Inspectors may carry audiovisual equipment, laptop or portable computers, ladders, flashlights, measuring equipment, and scientific instruments with them to job sites.

Computer systems must be backed up regularly and have adequate security features to prevent unauthorized access due to the potential for industrial espionage or by hackers. There may be a bailees exposure if the inspection bureau takes physical custody of customers' goods.

Crime exposure comes from employee dishonesty, including theft of clients' property, and various types of fraud since many businesses are dependent on certification or approval by inspectors. The exposure can be quite serious as inspectors have access to clients' personal and proprietary information.

Potential for theft, particularly industrial espionage, is great. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. Monitoring procedures and securing of all records should be enforced to prevent unauthorized access to client information.

here must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements.

Business auto exposures are moderate as inspectors travel to job sites or high if workers pick up and deliver samples and results. Inspectors may rent vehicles when sites to be inspected are not local.

If vehicles are supplied to employees, there should be written guidelines regarding the personal and permitted use of the vehicle by employees or their family members.

All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained, and records kept in a central location. If samples of hazardous materials are transported, special handling procedures may be required.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 4785 Fixed Facilities and Inspection And Weighing Services For Motor Vehicle Transportation, 6411 Insurance Agents, Brokers And Service, 7549 Automotive Services, Except Repair And Carwashes, 9641 Regulation Of Agricultural Marketing And Commodities, 9651 Regulation, Licensing, And Inspection Of Miscellaneous Commercial Sectors
  • NAICS CODE: 524298 All Other Insurance Related Activities, 541350 Building Inspections Services, 541990 All Other Professional, Scientific and Technical Services, 926140 Regulation of Agricultural Marketing and Commodities, 926150 Regulation, Licensing, and Inspection of Miscellaneous Commercial Sectors
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 96317, 91250, 92593, 97308
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 8720, 8721, 9410

4785: Fixed Facilities and Inspection And Weighing Services For Motor Vehicle Transportation

Division E: Transportation, Communications, Electric, Gas, And Sanitary Services | Major Group 47: Transportation Services | Industry Group 478: Miscellaneous Services Incidental To Transportation

4785 Fixed Facilities and Inspection And Weighing Services For Motor Vehicle Transportation: 4785 Fixed Facilities and Inspection and Weighing Services for Motor Vehicle Transportation Establishments primarily engaged in the inspection and weighing of goods in connection with transportation or in the operation of fixed facilities for motor vehicle transportation, such as toll roads, highway bridges, and other fixed facilities, except terminals.

  • Cargo checkers and surveyors, marine
  • Highway bridges, operation of
  • Inspection services connected with transportation
  • Toll bridge operation
  • Toll roads, operation of
  • Tunnel operation, vehicular
  • Weighing services connected with transportation

6411: Insurance Agents, Brokers And Service

Division H: Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate | Major Group 64: Insurance Agents, Brokers, And Service | Industry Group 641: Insurance Agents, Brokers, And Service

6411 Insurance Agents, Brokers And Service: Agents primarily representing one or more insurance carriers, or brokers not representing any particular carriers primarily engaged as independent contractors in the sale or placement of insurance contracts with carriers, but not employees of the insurance carriers they represent. This industry also includes independent organizations concerned with insurance services. Establishments engaged in searching real estate titles are classified in Industry 6541.

  • Fire Insurance Underwriters' Laboratories
  • Fire loss appraisal
  • Insurance adjusters
  • Insurance advisory services
  • Insurance agents
  • Insurance brokers
  • Insurance claim adjusters, not employed by insurance companies
  • Insurance educational services
  • Insurance information bureaus
  • Insurance inspection and investigation services
  • Insurance loss prevention services
  • Insurance patrol services
  • Insurance professional standards services
  • Insurance reporting services
  • Insurance research services
  • Insurance services
  • Life insurance agents
  • Medical insurance claims, processing of: contract or fee basis
  • Pension and retirement plan consultants
  • Policy holders' consulting service
  • Rate making organizations, insurance

7549: Automotive Services, Except Repair And Carwashes

Division I: Services | Major Group 75: Automotive Repair, Services, And Parking | Industry Group 754: Automotive Services, Except Repair

7549 Automotive Services, Except Repair And Carwashes: Establishments primarily engaged in furnishing automotive services, except repair and carwashes. Establishments primarily providing automobile driving instructions are classified in Industry 8299.

  • Auto emissions testing, without repairs
  • Diagnostic centers, automotive
  • Emissions testing service, automotive: without repair
  • Garages, do-it-yourself
  • Inspection service, automotive
  • Lubricating service, automotive
  • Road service, automotive
  • Rust-proofing service, automotive
  • Towing service, automotive
  • Undercoating service, automotive
  • Window tinting, automotive
  • Wrecker service (towing), automotive

9641: Regulation Of Agricultural Marketing And Commodities

Division J: Public Administration | Major Group 96: Administration Of Economic Programs | Industry Group 964: Regulation Of Agricultural Marketing And Commodities

9641 Regulation Of Agricultural Marketing And Commodities: Government establishments primarily engaged in planning, administration, and coordination of agricultural programs for production, marketing, and utilization, including related research, educational, and promotional activities. Establishments responsible for regulating and controlling the grading, inspection, and warehousing of agricultural products; the grading and inspection of foods; and the handling of plants and animals are classified here. Government establishments primarily engaged in administration of programs for developing economic data about agriculture and trade in agricultural products are classified in Industry 9611. Government establishments primarily engaged in programs for conservation of agricultural resources are classified in Industry 9512. Government establishments primarily engaged in programs to provide food to people are classified in Industry 9441.

  • Agriculture extension services
  • Agriculture fair boards-government
  • Food inspection agencies-government
  • Marketing and consumer services-government
  • Regulation and inspection of agricultural products-government/li>

9651: Regulation, Licensing, And Inspection Of Miscellaneous Commercial Sectors

Division J: Public Administration | Major Group 96: Administration Of Economic Programs | Industry Group 965: Regulation, Licensing, And Inspection Of

9651 Regulation, Licensing, And Inspection of Miscellaneous Commercial Sectors: Government establishments primarily engaged in regulation, licensing, and inspection of other commercial sectors, such as retail trade, professional occupations, manufacturing, mining, construction and services. Maintenance of physical standards, regulating hazardous conditions not elsewhere classified, and alcoholic beverage control are classified here. Private establishments primarily engaged in regulation, licensing, and establishment of standards are classified in Services, Division I.

  • Alcoholic beverage control boards-government
  • Banking regulatory agencies-government
  • Bureaus of standards-government
  • Inspection for labor standards-government
  • Insurance commissions-government
  • Labor-management negotiations boards-government
  • Licensing and permit for professional occupations-government
  • Licensing and permit for retail trade-government
  • Minimum wage program administration-government
  • Price control agencies-government
  • Rent control agencies-government
  • Securities regulation commissions
  • Wage control agencies-government

Inspection Bureau Insurance - The Bottom Line

To discover the exact types of inspection bureau insurance policies you'll need, how much coverage you should have and the premiums, speak with a reputable broker that is experienced in commercial insurance.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Professional Services Insurance

Get informed about small business professional services insurance, including Professional liability, aka errors and omissions (E&O insurance), that protects your business against claims that a professional service you provided caused your client financial loss.


Professional Services Insurance

Let's face reality. People today are claims conscious, resulting in a significant share of malpractice lawsuits against professionals.

Liability resulting from the rendering of or the failure to render professional services is excluded in most liability coverage forms. This means that a policy covering a account's or lawyers' office will cover liability arising out of the maintenance or use of the premises, but specifically exclude liability arising out of the rendering of a professional service or the omission of such a service.

In addition to the professions in which actual physical or mental injury may be caused to clients, certain other professions are exposed to claims for malpractice.

Claims may be brought against lawyers, accountants, architects, and similar professional persons for errors or omissions in their professional capacity. Errors & Omissions insurance pays damages that might be awarded to a plaintiff alleging professional negligence.

Professional liability policies are made available to such risks, and these policies provide essentially the same protection as is afforded under the physicians, surgeons or dentists professional liability policy.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Professional Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Money and Securities, Special Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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