Title Abstractor Insurance

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Title Abstractor Insurance Policy Information

Title Abstractor Insurance

Title Abstractor Insurance. An abstractor of title, who may also be referred to as a title abstractor, title examiner, or title searcher, has the important job of determining the ownership history of a particular property - whether it be land or real estate.

Abstracters research public records to determine the history of ownership for a parcel of land that is being transferred or sold. These records show the original state of the property, all changes or modifications, any known defects, liens, mortgages or encumbrances, and its current status.

The abstracter verifies that the land and its boundaries are described correctly and identifies any outstanding encumbrances, such as property tax or homeowners' association fees, on the property, which the current property owner must rectify before it can be sold.

Most lending institutions require an abstract indicating clear title prior to providing a loan for the purchase of real property. Purchasers of land will want an up-to-date abstract prior to the purchase of property. Some states require abstracters to be licensed.

It is thanks to these professionals that buyers can rest assured that a property they are looking to purchase is free and clear, meaning there is no lien that could later come back to haunt the buyer.

While title abstractors can find satisfying and stable employment in various settings, from real estate brokers to insurance companies or legal firms, they may also work independently and start their own businesses.

Whether you already own your own company or are considering doing so in the future, it is important to keep in mind that no amount of professional skill can prevent all unforeseen circumstances that may negatively impact your financial outlook.

Because of that, it is crucial to carefully evaluate what types of title abstractor insurance may be required. To find out more, keep reading.

Title abstractor insurance protects title examiners and searchers from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked title searcher insurance questions:


How Much Does Title Abstractor Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small title examiners ranges from $37 to $59 per month based on location, size, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do Title Abstractors Need Insurance?

Title Insurance

Title companies need insurance not merely to meet their legal obligations, or to allow them to work with lenders to grow their businesses, but also simply to protect them from the potentially extensive - and even, in the worst cases, bankrupting - consequences of major perils.

Title companies will, after all, be vulnerable to the same risks as nearly any other business, while also facing some risks specific to this branch of commerce.

A title company's commercial premises could be impacted by perils as varied as theft, vandalism, accidents, and acts of nature, like wildfires, hurricanes, or lightning strikes.

In these cases, the resulting expenses are likely to exceed what you can comfortably deal with in-house, and you have to keep in mind that costly business interruptions can often be added to the burden of repair and replacement costs.

In terms of liability, title companies foremost have to consider the possibility that they could be sued due to professional negligence or errors, or even fraud - and remember, such claims may be made even if you are ultimately found innocent, but still lead to exorbitant legal fees.

Furthermore, even a client slipping in your bathroom, or client data being stolen by cyber criminals, could lead to lawsuits.

Having the right type of title abstractor insurance coverage will protect you from financial burden. Should a client become injured while visiting your shop and file a lawsuit, for example, commercial insurance will cover the cost of any necessary medical bills, as well as legal fees.


What Type Of Insurance Do Title Abstractors Need?

A broad variety of insurance options exist, from an equally wide spectrum of insurers. What forms of coverage are essential, and which ones do you not need?

Because that will largely depend on your title company's individual circumstances, it is crucial to consult a skilled commercial insurance broker who understands your field of commerce as well as your particular business.

Your company's location, the nature and scope of your work, the value of your assets, and your number of employees all play a role in influencing your insurance needs. Businesses in this industry, meanwhile, likely to need these core types of title abstractor insurance coverage:

  • Commercial Property: This form of coverage protects your business from financial devastation resulting from property damage or loss caused by perils like acts of nature, theft, and vandalism. It covers both the physical building and its contents.
  • Errors And Omissions: Because title examiners may always be accused of professional errors, negligence, or other forms of misconduct, regardless of the size of their business, this form of coverage is arguably the most essential for title abstractors. It is also often called professional liability insurance, and will help you manage related legal costs.
  • Commercial General Liability: This broad type of title abstractor insurance coverage is vital if a third party files a lawsuit in which they allege that you were responsible for bodily injury or property damage. It will help to cover attorney fees, court expenses, and even settlement payouts.
  • Workers' Compensation: Should you have employees, you will also need to carry workers comp, which protects you from financial loss and litigation alike if an employer sustains a workplace injury. Workers compensation not only covers the employee's medical expenses, but also the income they may lose if they are unable to return to work for a time.

Other examples of title abstractor insurance coverage title companies may require or choose to acquire are commercial auto insurance, cyber security insurance, and business interruption insurance, which covers lost revenue after your premises are struck by a major peril.

To make sure you have all your bases covered, talk your needs through with a commercial insurance broker.


Title Abstractor's Risks & Exposures

Real Estate Contract

Premises liability exposure is very limited at the firm's office due to lack of public access. If clients visit the premises, they must be confined to designated areas. To prevent slips, trips, or falls, all areas accessible to clients must be well maintained with floor covering in good condition.

The number of exits must be sufficient, and be well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

Off-site exposures include visits to government record facilities and contact with the general public. There should be a policy and procedure manual explaining expectations when employees are off-site.

Personal injury liability exposures include allegations of assault, breach of confidentiality, discrimination, and invasion of privacy.

Professional liability exposure can be high. Improper research can result in the property being transferred with unresolved issues regarding ownership, liens, or other encumbrances, which puts the buyer at risk of losing the property or having to pay debts incurred by previous owners.

Precise methods must be followed, and all research must be verified prior to release to the real estate company, financial institution, or buyer requesting the title search.

Workers compensation exposure is generally limited to that of an office. Since work is done on computers, potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and similar cumulative trauma injuries that can be addressed through ergonomically designed workstations.

Property exposure is generally limited to an office. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, wear, and overheating of equipment. Storage of paper and any materials needed to conduct research should be in fireproof cabinets. Fire suppression systems must not damage the papers. Computers and other electronic equipment may be targets for theft.

Inland marine exposure is from accounts receivable if the firm offers credit, computers, and valuable papers and records for research and clients' information. The abstracts on file are typically originals that are difficult to recreate. Power failure and power surges are potentially severe hazards.

A morale hazard may be indicated if the insured does not keep valuable papers in fireproof file cabinets to protect them from smoke, water, and fire. Duplicates should be kept off-site to allow for re-creation in the event of a loss.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty, including various types of fraud. Employees have access to records that may affect customers' property values and salability. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements. Receipts should be issued for any cash payments received. Audits should be performed at least annually.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired and non-owned. If vehicles are provided to employees, there should be written procedures in place regarding personal use by employees and their family members. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and records kept in a central location.

Off-site exposures may include slips and falls, automobile accidents, and respiratory infections from a review of public records stored in older facilities.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 6541 Title Abstract Offices
  • NAICS CODE: 541191 Title Abstract and Settlement Offices
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 61224, 61225
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 8810

Description for 6541 Title Abstract Offices

Division H: Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate | Major Group 65: Real Estate | Industry Group 654: Title Abstract Offices

6541: Title Abstract Offices: Establishments primarily engaged in searching real estate titles. This industry does not include title insurance companies which are classified in Industry 6361.

  • Title abstract companies
  • Title and trust companies
  • Title reconveyance companies
  • Title search companies

Title Abstractor Insurance - The Bottom Line

To protect your title search business and your clients, having the right title abstractor insurance coverage is important. To see the options are available to you, how much coverage you should invest in and the cost - speak to a reputable commercial insurance agent.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Professional Services Insurance

Get informed about small business professional services insurance, including Professional liability, aka errors and omissions (E&O insurance), that protects your business against claims that a professional service you provided caused your client financial loss.


Professional Services Insurance

Let's face reality. People today are claims conscious, resulting in a significant share of malpractice lawsuits against professionals.

Liability resulting from the rendering of or the failure to render professional services is excluded in most liability coverage forms. This means that a policy covering a account's or lawyers' office will cover liability arising out of the maintenance or use of the premises, but specifically exclude liability arising out of the rendering of a professional service or the omission of such a service.

In addition to the professions in which actual physical or mental injury may be caused to clients, certain other professions are exposed to claims for malpractice.

Claims may be brought against lawyers, accountants, architects, and similar professional persons for errors or omissions in their professional capacity. Errors & Omissions insurance pays damages that might be awarded to a plaintiff alleging professional negligence.

Professional liability policies are made available to such risks, and these policies provide essentially the same protection as is afforded under the physicians, surgeons or dentists professional liability policy.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Professional Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Money and Securities, Special Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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