Oregon Vending Machine Operators Insurance

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Oregon Vending Machine Operators Insurance Policy Information

OR Vending Machine Operators Insurance

Oregon Vending Machine Operators Insurance. Owning and operating a vending machine business is a rewarding opportunity. It allows you the freedom to choose who you work with and establish your own schedule.

So long as the vending machines you manage are clean, functioning properly, stocked with a nice array of food and beverages, and situated in prime locations, you can make a pretty lucrative income - all while being able to focus on other aspects of your life because you don't have to punch a clock and follow the daily "grind".

Vending machine operators install and service coin-operated machines on the premises of others. The operator owns the machines or leases them from a dealer. Some machines dispense food products such as candy, cold drinks, hot drinks, sandwiches, and other snacks.

Others dispense consumer goods such as cigarettes, condoms, movies on DVDs, newspapers, over-the-counter medications, personal grooming or sanitary supplies, tobacco products, or video games. Once installed, the operator replenishes stock in the machines and collects money from sales, usually on a weekly basis.

A percentage of the sales is paid to the owner of the premises on which the machine is located. There should be a contract between the vending machine operator and the location owner that clearly spells out the responsibilities of each regarding the vending operation.

While it's certainly true that being a vending machine operator can certainly be a fulfilling venture and a pretty low-risk business, like anything in business (and in life), you are still exposed to certain risks, and it's important to protect yourself from them.

Whether you're a one-person show and you handle all of the nitty-gritty of your vending machine business on your own or you delegate the bulk of the tasks that are associated with your operations to a crew of employees, investing insurance policies that is specifically designed for vending machine operators is an absolute must.

What is Oregon vending machine operators insurance? Why is it important? Read on to learn more.

Oregon vending machine operators insurance protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

What Is Vending Machine Operators Insurance?

As the name suggest, Oregon vending machine operators insurance refers to insurance policies that are designed specifically for those who own and operate vending machine businesses.

Just like any form of insurance that is designed for a particular industry, OR vending machine operators insurance offers coverage for the risks that owners and operators of vending machine businesses face.

Why Is Vending Machine Operators Insurance Important?

This type of insurance is important for a two main reasons. First, should your business be impacted by certain risks, this coverage protects you from having to pay for the financial damages that are associated with such risks out of your own pocket.

For instance, imagine how costly it would be if someone were to vandalize just one of your vending machines and steal the contents within it (including any cash inside)? Having to cover those costs yourself would be astronomical; not to mention the money that would be out for any sales if the cash inside a vandalized machine was stolen.

With the right type of Oregon vending machine operators insurance coverage, instead of paying the price of repairs yourself and eating (for lack of a better word) any lost revenue, your insurance carrier would pay for the damages and even replace lost income.

The second reason why investing in OR vending machine operators insurance is because in many locations, it's contractually required.

If you aren't properly insured, there's a chance that you could end up facing serious legal ramifications and potentially even lose your business.

In other words, not only will insurance potentially save you a significant amount of money, but it can also help you avoid having your operation shuttered.

What Type Of Vending Machine Operators Insurance Do I Need?

As mentioned above, Oregon vending machine operators insurance covers the key risks that business owners in this industry face. Examples of some of the different coverages that are provided with this type of policy include:

  • General Liability - General liability covers third-part personal injury and property damage. For instance, in the event that one of your machines falls over on top of a patron, this part of your insurance would pay for any medical care that the patron might require, as well as any legal fees you would incur if the third-party filed a lawsuit against you, including damages that you may be legally required to pay out.
  • Commercial Property - This part of your vending machine operators insurance will protect from having to pay for any damages that your vending machines may face. For example, if a machine were vandalized, your insurance carrier would cover the cost of the repairs.
  • Inland Marine - If any of your equipment or products are damaged while they are being stored while they are in transit or stored on someone else's OR property, marine inland coverage would pay for the necessary repairs or cover the cost of replacing the equipment or products.

These are just a few examples of the coverage that an OR vending machine operators insurance provides. You should speak with an experienced agent who can customize your coverages based on your operations.

Oregon Vending Machines Owner's & Operator's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is limited at the office location due to lack of public access. At off-site locations, installation or servicing of machines and the placement of improperly secured electrical cords may present a tripping hazard. Machines should have stabilizers to prevent falling over if tampered with or jostled.

Product liability exposure is moderate due to the possibility of allergic reactions, food poisoning, contamination, and spoilage from improper refrigeration. Food stock should be dated with products past their expiration date removed and discarded. The temperature of hot drinks should be limited to prevent scalding injuries.

Repair and refurbishment of old machines for sale to others can result in additional exposures.

Workers compensation exposure is high due to the constant lifting and moving of vending machines which can cause back injury, hernia, sprains, and strains. Other injuries can occur from falling machines, automobile accidents, slips and falls, and holdups. Employees should be provided with safety equipment, trained on proper handling techniques, and have conveying devices available to assist with heavy lifting.

Repair work can result in cuts, punctures, or respiratory ailments from exposure to paint or fumes from solvents. Employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner to hold-ups. Office workers can incur repetitive injuries from use of computers. Workstations should be ergonomically designed.

Property exposure is limited to office, storage areas for the stock and out-of-service vending machines on premises. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating, and cooling systems. These should be well maintained and meet current codes for the occupancy.

The stock is combustible, but as items are quickly transported to off-site vending machines, there should be limited quantities at the main location. Repairs made on premises may involve the use of flammables for cleaning, welding, or painting. These must be properly stored, separated, and controlled. Repair operations should be conducted away from combustibles.

If forklifts are used, they should be recharged in well-ventilated areas away from combustibles. Vending machines and stock at offsite locations should be covered on an inland marine form.

Crime exposure includes employee dishonesty and loss of money and securities from holdup or jimmying of machines. Background checks should be conducted on all employees handling money, including those collecting money from machines. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements.

Money should be regularly collected from off-site vending machines. There should be coin-counters in each machine to verify the accuracy of collections. Hold-ups may occur on service routes.

Inland marine exposure is from computers used to track inventories, valuable papers, and records from customers' and vendors' information, and vending machines and stock in transit and away from the premises. Backup copies of all records, including computer files, should be made and stored off premises.

Vending machines are heavy and can be damaged during transport by overturning or collision. At customers' premises, exposures are beyond the control of the operator but may include electrical disturbances, fire, water damage, theft, and vandalism. Machines or stock may be stolen from delivery vehicles.

Commercial Auto exposures can be high due to the extensive transport of goods and machines on routes that can include adverse driving conditions from weather, poorly maintained roads, and congested traffic. Vending machines are heavy and easy to damage.

There should be appropriate tie downs to prevent shifting and falling during transport. Drivers must have an appropriate license and acceptable MVR. Vehicles must be regularly maintained with records kept.

OR Vending Machine Operators Insurance - The Bottom Line

To find out what type of Oregon vending machine operators insurance policies you'll need to carry, speak with a commercial insurance broker that specializes in vending insurance.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2021.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2021 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Retail Insurance

Read valuable small business retail insurance policy information. In a retail business, you need to have the right type of commercial insurance coverage so that your store, employees, and inventory are protected.


Retail Insurance

Retail stores are susceptible to premises liability claims because of customer traffic, but large department and specialty stores are more susceptible than most.

All retail stores have significant property exposures. The on-hand stock represents a considerable investment, but the amount on hand fluctuates seasonally. For this reason, physical damage insurance on this property must be arranged carefully. When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured's interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Crime insurance, in the form of employee theft and money and securities coverage, is also very important.

The businessowners policy was designed with retail exposures and operations in mind. For this reason alone, it should always be the first type of package coverage to consider. However, for those risks not eligible for the business owners policy program, the commercial package policy (CPP) is a practical and convenient way to combine a number of coverages into one policy.

Retail businesses generate income through interaction with customers. This interaction is also how a customer can sustain an injury and then sue the retailer for damages. Hazards, exposures and operations both on premises and off are important and must be covered, but liability the retailer may incur because of the merchandise sold must also be considered and insurance protection arranged.

Inventory or stock is the major property exposure for most retail operations. Because stock values tend to fluctuate or have significant peaks at certain times of the year, value reporting or peak season valuation options should be considered. Business income coverage, including business income from dependent properties coverage, may mean the difference between a retail operation staying in business or being forced into bankruptcy following a loss.

When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured’s interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Most retail businesses offer endless opportunities for a variety of criminal activities. For this reason, the coverages needed must be carefully evaluated. Holdup and robbery losses may be the most obvious concerns but employee theft, fraud and counterfeit money losses are also serious issues that cannot be dismissed.

Retail businesses are gaining greater exposure to international issues because of the growth in sales via the internet. As these sales increase, the added exposures faced by these retailers must be evaluated. While their operating horizons are expanding so are their potential loss exposures.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Bailees Customers, Goods in Transit, Jewelers Block, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Oregon insurance agents & brokers and learn about Oregon small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including OR business insurance costs. Call us (503) 610-0300.

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