Oregon Convenience Store Insurance (Quotes, Cost & Coverage)

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Frequently Asked Questions About
Commercial General Liability Insurance

How much does commercial insurance cost?

Costs can vary widely based on industry and are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. Request a free quote to get an exact number.

What kind of business insurance do I need?

Most business owners need General Liability Insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you will need workers compensation insurance too.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance is proof of coverage. It lists the type and amount of liability coverage you have and other policy information when a third party requests it.

Is business insurance tax deductible?

Yes. you can deduct the cost of commercial insurance premiums. The IRS considers insurance a cost of doing business as long it benefits the business & serves a business purpose.

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Oregon Convenience Store Insurance

OR Convenience Store Insurance

Oregon Convenience Store Insurance. Convenience stores sell perishable staples such as milk and bread and immediate need products such as coffee, condoms or tobacco to customers who are in a hurry and want to avoid traveling to larger retail stores. Convenience stores may also stock auto maintenance items, books, and magazines, canned or frozen food, household cleaning items, liquor products (where permitted), lottery tickets, newspapers, novelties, over-the-counter medications, personal care products, and snack items.

There may be microwave ovens available, so customers can heat their pre-packaged food items. Others have delicatessens on premises that offer sandwiches, pizza, and beverages to go. Other services may include car washes, gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, propane, and fuel oils. Many are located close to highways or other busy intersections and are open on a 24-7 basis.

Convenience stores are all around us, making our lives easier by offering products we need on the go. If you own a convenience store, you know just how lucrative the convenience store business can be. However, with business ownership comes responsibilities, including the need to have insurance that covers you and your business in the event that you are sued.

You must protect yourself and your business interests with the right levels of liability and property insurance as well as other Oregon convenience store insurance types that are specific for your business.

Oregon convenience store insurance protects your shop from lawsuits with rates as low as $57/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Convenience Stores Need Business Insurance?

Around 40,000 convenience stores are operating in the U.S. as of 2014. Approximately 138,000 people work in convenience stores. Revenue from convenience stores amounts to around $35 billion each year. Because convenience stores are such diverse businesses, no two policies are alike, but many share the same bundle of different coverage types.

Your commercial broker can help you understand the nuances of the industry from a risk perspective, so you can be assured that you are fully protected, based on your individual risks and your tolerance to risk. Your broker will look at what you need to protect, your assets and your liabilities, when helping you choose the right Oregon convenience store insurance coverage for your needs.

Commercial Property Insurance

Protecting your business against property damage is a big part of being a responsible business owner. Other than your building or storefront, the inventory inside your store is one of your biggest assets. Building insurance is an important part of you Oregon convenience store insurance policy. It covers the damage that might occur to your actual store, the building, its canopies, and gas pumps, assuming you are the owner of the store and premises. If you rent your store, then you may be required by your landlord to purchase this coverage. Consult with your insurance agent to review your lease agreement and determine if you need to buy the coverage or if the landlord provides it for you.

The contents of your business should be covered by contents or business personal property insurance. This coverage provides protection for your inventory, shelving, fixtures, computers, and any equipment. Also consider boiler and machinery insurance. This Oregon convenience store insurance covers the rental, repair, or replacement expense should your machinery necessary for operating your business go on the fritz. Perhaps your store sells food products that must be operational in order for you to do business. If your freezers or refrigerators break down, then your inventory goes bad. Spoilage insurance can be part of your boilers and machinery coverage, compensating you for this loss.

Commercial crime insurance is a good idea for all OR convenience stores, since they are oftentimes the target of robberies and burglaries. If your store is targeted, this insurance mitigates any financial losses that may result. This insurance is recommended in addition to risk management practices like installing cameras to monitor customer activity; this can reduce the rates you pay for your coverage.

Business Liability Insurance

General liability insurance should be a cornerstone of your coverage. This protects you in the event of slips and falls or other injuries to customers, vendors, and others on your property. It can also pay for defense costs if you find yourself faced with a liability claim in court. Premises liability coverage protects you from third-party claims for damage to property or bodily injury. This covers you from claims that may result from activity in your store, in its parking lot, gas area, and other locations around your business.

If you sell liquor, you may be required by the state in which you live to purchase OR liquor liability insurance. If an intoxicated person causes harm after buying liquor from you, this coverage handles any claims or awards up to the limits spelled out in your Oregon convenience store insurance policy.

Cyber liability coverage is becoming more important for convenience stores, especially for those that sell gasoline. This is due to skimming devices that are sometimes planted on pumps in order to steal patrons' info. If this happens at your store, cyber liability policies can help to reduce the financial fallout for you.

Other Types Of Convenience Store Coverage

You may also need other types of Oregon convenience store insurance coverage to fully protect your business and personal interests. Worker's compensation, for example, is required in most states. You may also need business income insurance to provide an income stream if your business is forced to halt for a covered peril. Employment practices liability coverage can provide protection for suits that may arise if someone feels as if you discriminated against them.

Oregon Convenience Stores's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is very high due to public access to the premises. Trips, slips, and falls are major concerns, especially during inclement weather when customers track snow, mud, and water into the store. All goods should be kept on easily reached shelves so that customers do not pull items down on themselves. Customers can drop or spill items and may carry food or fountain drinks throughout the store, generating spills. Housekeeping should be excellent, and spills must be cleaned up promptly, with warning signs posted after mopping.

Floor coverings must be in good condition, with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked. There should be well marked, sufficient exits with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair, with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slip and falls. Customers can be injured or killed during a robbery. Security of visitors in parking areas is rapidly becoming the responsibility of the owner or operator of the premises. Outdoor security and lighting must be consistent with the area.

Products liability exposure due to the possibility of food poisoning, contamination spoilage, foreign objects in the product, and allergic reactions. Monitoring the quality of food received, posting lists of ingredients, and maintaining proper storage temperature can reduce this exposure. Accurate records must be kept of products and batches to monitor for recalls. There should be controls in place to prevent contamination from chemicals such as insecticides and pesticides used for pest control. The stock should be regularly rotated so that older stock is sold first. Out of date stock must be removed on a regular basis and discarded.

Liquor liability exposures are from selling liquor to underage individuals and those already intoxicated as there is no on-premises consumption of alcoholic beverages. Any failure to comply with state and federal regulations can result in the loss of a liquor permit. There must be a set procedure to check ages of anyone attempting to purchase alcohol. Employees must be trained to recognize signs of intoxication.

Workers compensation exposures are very high due to heavy lifting and robberies. Improper lifting can cause back injury, hernias, sprains, and strains. Floors may become slick, resulting in slips and falls. Anhydrous ammonia refrigerants are poisonous when leaked into confined spaces such as coolers.

Controls must be in place to maintain, check, and prevent such injury. Cleaning staff can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. Employees should be provided with safety equipment, trained on proper handling techniques, and have conveying devices available to assist with heavy lifting. Injury or death during holdup is a major cause of loss. Employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner. Often, there are defensive tools available to the employees such as pepper spray, baseball bats, or guns.

Proper training in the use of implementations for self-defense that is provided or permitted is essential. Employee turnover may be high. Company incentives to encourage long-term employment are positive signs of management control. Workers must also be able to deal with unruly customers.

Property exposure is very high from electrical wiring, cooking equipment, refrigeration units, and heating and air conditioning systems. The wiring must be current and up to code. Due to its combustibility, an ammonia detection system should be in place if ammonia is used as a refrigerant. If there is cooking on premises, all grills and deep fat fryers must have automatic fire extinguishing protection, hoods, and filters. There should be fuel shut-offs and adequate hand-held fire extinguishers. Kitchen areas must be kept clean and grease free to prevent the spread of fire. Filters should be changed regularly.

Smoking can be a fundamental problem and should be prohibited on premises. Spoilage exposure is very high if refrigeration equipment malfunctions or loses power. A small fire or power outage of even moderate duration can render all fresh and frozen goods to be condemned as unfit for consumption or sale. Alarms and warning devices should be in place to alert the operation when there is a loss of power. Backup power, such as a generator, should be available. If there are gasoline sales, additional exposures include fumes and the potential for explosion.

Theft is a concern, especially when alcoholic beverages or tobacco products are available. Appropriate security measures should be in place, such as keeping more expensive items behind the counter and inaccessible to customers and having security mirrors prominently displayed throughout the store. Premises alarms should report to a central station or police department after hours.

Equipment breakdown exposures are high as operations are dependent on refrigeration equipment, cooking equipment, and fuel pumps if fuel is sold.

Crime exposure is severe for both employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities. The 24-hour or late night/early morning hours, the extensive number of cash transactions, plus attractive locations close to major thoroughfares and interstates, make convenience stores a target for a holdup. A bulletproof cashier's cage may be necessary for high-crime areas. Background checks should be conducted on all employees.

The inventory must be under the supervision of more than one individual so that there are checks and balances. All orders, billing, and disbursements must be handled as separate duties. Regular audits must be conducted. Money should be regularly stripped from the cash drawers and placed in a safe away from the front door. Irregular drops should be made to the bank to prevent a substantial accumulation of cash on the premises.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivables from billings to customers, computers for inventories and sales transactions, signs, and valuable papers and records for suppliers' and employees' information. Backup copies of all records, including computer records, should be made and stored off premises.

Business auto exposure generally is limited to hired or non-owned liability exposures from employees running errands.

OR Convenience Store Insurance

The bottom line is that you need to review your coverage needs with a professional to ensure that you get the protection your store needs.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2018.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2018 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Retail Insurance

Read valuable small business retail insurance policy information. In a retail business, you need to have the right type of commercial insurance coverage so that your store, employees, and inventory are protected.


Retail Insurance

The businessowners policy was designed with retail exposures and operations in mind. For this reason alone, it should always be the first type of package coverage to consider. However, for those risks not eligible for the business owners policy program, the commercial package policy (CPP) is a practical and convenient way to combine a number of coverages into one policy.

Retail businesses generate income through interaction with customers. This interaction is also how a customer can sustain an injury and then sue the retailer for damages. Hazards, exposures and operations both on premises and off are important and must be covered, but liability the retailer may incur because of the merchandise sold must also be considered and insurance protection arranged.

Inventory or stock is the major property exposure for most retail operations. Because stock values tend to fluctuate or have significant peaks at certain times of the year, value reporting or peak season valuation options should be considered. Business income coverage, including business income from dependent properties coverage, may mean the difference between a retail operation staying in business or being forced into bankruptcy following a loss.

When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured’s interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Most retail businesses offer endless opportunities for a variety of criminal activities. For this reason, the coverages needed must be carefully evaluated. Holdup and robbery losses may be the most obvious concerns but employee theft, fraud and counterfeit money losses are also serious issues that cannot be dismissed.

Retail businesses are gaining greater exposure to international issues because of the growth in sales via the internet. As these sales increase, the added exposures faced by these retailers must be evaluated. While their operating horizons are expanding so are their potential loss exposures.


Request a free Oregon Convenience Store insurance quote in Albany, Ashland, Astoria, Aumsville, Baker, Bandon, Beaverton, Bend, Boardman, Brookings, Burns, Canby, Carlton, Central Point, Coos Bay, Coquille, Cornelius, Corvallis, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dallas, Damascus, Dayton, Dundee, Eagle Point, Estacada, Eugene, Fairview, Florence, Forest Grove, Gervais, Gladstone, Gold Beach, Grants Pass, Gresham, Happy Valley, Harrisburg, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Hubbard, Independence, Jacksonville, Jefferson, Junction, Keizer, King, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Lafayette, Lake Oswego, Lakeview town, Lebanon, Lincoln, Madras, McMinnville, Medford, Milton-Freewater, Milwaukie, Molalla, Monmouth, Mount Angel, Myrtle Creek, Myrtle Point, Newberg, Newport, North Bend, Nyssa, Oakridge, Ontario, Oregon, Pendleton, Philomath, Phoenix, Portland, Prineville, Redmond, Reedsport, Rogue River, Roseburg, Salem, Sandy, Scappoose, Seaside, Shady Cove, Sheridan, Sherwood, Silverton, Sisters, Springfield, St. Helens, Stanfield, Stayton, Sublimity, Sutherlin, Sweet Home, Talent, The Dalles, Tigard, Tillamook, Toledo, Troutdale, Tualatin, Umatilla, Union, Veneta, Vernonia, Waldport, Warrenton, West Linn, Willamina, Wilsonville, Winston, Wood Village, Woodburn and all other cities in OR - The Beaver State.


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