Kansas Music Store Insurance

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Kansas Music Store Insurance Policy Information

KS Music Store Insurance

Kansas Music Store Insurance. Musical instrument dealers may sell one type of instrument, such as organs or pianos, or sell a variety of instruments. Related items such as accessories, cases, CDs, music books, sheet music or tapes may also be sold. Many stores offer other services including classes, exhibitions, recitals, piano tuning, repair or design and manufacture of custom instruments. Instruments may be rented to individuals or to schools. Used instruments may be reconditioned and sold.

Stores selling larger instruments may offer delivery and installation services. Delivery may be on owned vehicles or may be contracted out.

When you're a small business owner, there are a lot of things to think about on any given day. Something that's often overlooked in the hustle and bustle is commercial insurance. However, this insurance is one of the biggest favors that you can do for yourself and your business. It gives you peace of mind and allows you to weather unexpected events and property damage.

Let's take a look at what you should consider when you're looking for Kansas music store insurance that hits all the right notes.

Kansas music store insurance protects your shop from lawsuits with rates as low as $57/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Protect Your Building

At the most basic level, insurance for a music shop should protect your physical location. The physical location of your business is likely your biggest asset. This includes the real estate and the building itself. The physical building and property it sits on are places that a lot of things can go wrong, including storm damage, fires, floods and criminal activity.

Make sure you speak with your broker because your needs likely differ if you own your property or if you lease it. You have options when it comes what your Kansas music store insurance policy covers, so be sure to speak with your insurance professional about the various types of property coverage and what best suits your needs.

Protect Your Inventory

Your second-largest asset beyond your building is probably your inventory. The nature of a music store is that you sell instruments and accessories to the public. Your customer base likely includes professionals looking for top of the line instruments and also school children and their parents looking for their first instrument for the school band or orchestra. The value of your inventory is likely significant and you want to make sure that it's well protected. Any Kansas music store insurance that you purchase for your shop certainly should cover your inventory.

Also, when you're considering this type of insurance coverage, make sure you understand how things in your business are classified. For example, you might have pianos, benches and music stands that you use for music lessons that are taught at your store. It's important to read your quote carefully to see if these things are covered as inventory. Your insurance provider should explain your policy in plain words so that you can have confidence in your coverage.

Coverage for Fixtures

Another important thing to make sure your insurance covers is fixtures. When you run a music store, you have a lot of them. Your business likely has stands to display instruments, display cases for accessories and other displays for pieces of music. Add the value of all of these pieces up and it's likely a big number. It's important that your Kansas music store insurance covers fixtures so that you're not left with this unexpected expense if the worst happens.

Replace Your Income

What a lot of KS music store owners don't know is that you can purchase insurance that covers your income in the event that you have a business interruption. If you have a catastrophic event that affects your building, you might not be able to operate until you can rebuild. If you lose your inventory, you need time to replace it before you can continue to do business. One of the types of insurance that you can buy for your music store is insurance that pays you income when you suffer an event that causes an interruption in business operation. This can give you peace of mind, especially if your store is your livelihood.

Criminal Activity

While we like to think we can always trust our employees, crime is something that music stores have to contend with. Sadly, employees can embezzle money or steal from the business in other ways. Your Kansas music store insurance policy can provide coverage that compensates you if this happens to your business. That way, you don't have to hope that the person who stole from you is able and willing to pay back what they took. With this coverage, you know that you're made whole in the event of employee theft.

Legal Liability

Sometimes, accidents happen. Other times, customers or employees file frivolous lawsuits looking for a payday. Either way, when you're thinking about insurance for your music store, legal liability is one important thing that you want covered. A person could slip and fall and injure themselves on your property or a customer could claim they suffered harm because of a product you sold. There are options that allow you to protect yourself if you find yourself on the receiving end of a claim like this.

Your insurance provider should be happy to sit down and explain the ins and outs of your policy. You have options, and a trained professional can fashion a policy to meet your needs. The right insurance can give you peace of mind.

Kansas Musical Instrument Store's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure comes from slips and falls due to public access to the premises. Aisles must be adequate and free of debris with flooring in good condition with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked. Sufficient exits must be provided and be well marked with backup lighting systems in case of power failure.

All goods should be kept on easily reached shelves so that customers do not pull down items on themselves. Any classes must be well controlled with adequate space and enough teachers for supervision. If lessons for young children are provided, reference and criminal background checks should be conducted on all teachers.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. If the business is open after dark, there should be adequate lighting and appropriate security for the area.

If delivery and installation services are offered, customers' premises may be damaged.

Personal injury exposure can arise from apprehending and detaining suspected shoplifters. The use of closed-circuit camera systems prevents such incidents from evolving into a "he said she said" situation. Employees must be trained to deal with handle such delicate situations properly.

Products liability exposure is normally very low except for electrical equipment that must have adequate warnings to prevent shocks. Any manufacturing work, direct import of products, repair or reconditioning of used instruments for resale will add to the exposure. If the store sends customers' instruments to outside firms for servicing, certificates of insurance should be obtained as evidence that the outside firm carries appropriate coverage.

Workers compensation exposures are from lifting that can cause back injury, hernia, sprains, and strains, and from slips and falls. Repair and manufacturing can result in cuts, punctures, or injury from machines. Polishes, buffers, or other chemicals can cause burns, as well as eye, skin, or lung irritations. Employees handling heavy pianos or organs should be provided with safety equipment, trained on proper handling techniques, and have conveying devices available.

Shelves should be easily accessible for storage. Stepladders should be available. Housekeeping in storage areas, especially during peak times, is vital to prevent trips and falls. In any retail business, hold-ups are possible. Employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner. Drivers of delivery trucks can be injured in accidents, be crushed by falling instruments, or fall on stairs or from tailgates.

Property exposures include electrical wiring, heating and cooling systems. The electrical load may be heavy if instruments such as electrical guitars or amplifiers are plugged into numerous outlets for customers to try out prior to purchase. Wiring must be up to date and meet current codes. Instruments are highly susceptible to damage from water, heat and fire so even a small fire could cause a total loss.

If repair or manufacturing is done on premises, flammable stains, varnishes, cleaners and polishes increase the fire load. Woodworking and metalworking each have their own sets of hazards to be evaluated. If the store rents instruments to schools, inventories will be increased during certain times of the year. Smaller instruments are easy to shoplift. Theft is a major exposure due to the attractive nature and expense of the items.

Appropriate security measures should be taken, including physical barriers to prevent entrance to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Business interruption is a concern since sales may peak at particular times during the year.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and loss of money and securities either from holdup or safe burglary. Background checks should be conducted on all employees handling money. There must be separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements. Money should be regularly collected from cash drawers and moved away from the collection area, preferably to a safe on premises. Bank drops should be made throughout the day to prevent a buildup of cash on the premises. Two employees should be required to confirm the accuracy of deliveries from vendors.

Inland marine exposures are from accounts receivable if the store offers credit, bailees customers from customers' instruments in for repair, computers for transacting sales and monitoring inventory, goods off premises if the store rents instruments, and valuable papers due to customers' and vendors' records. Backup copies of all records, including computer records, should be made and stored off premises. Rental contracts should specify whether the store or the customer is responsible for loss or damage.

Commercial auto exposure can be high if delivery services are provided. Larger instruments may be delivered on congested streets to residential areas with children present. All drivers must have valid and appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained with records kept. Piano and organ delivery requires special training.

KS Music Store Insurance

KS music store insurance can cover a lot of different things and it's important to find the policy that's right for you. Spending a little time with a knowledgeable agent can save you more time and heartache on down the road. Contacting an insurance provider is the first step towards protecting your shop and giving you one less thing to worry about. Make sure your music store insurance measures up.

Kansas Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Kansas

Whether you're an experienced business owner who has successfully started several companies or you're a novice who is looking to establish your first startup, selecting the right location for your operations is extremely important.

It doesn't matter how stellar the products and services you offer are, if the location where your business is located doesn't offer a favorable climate, it's more than likely you aren't going to succeed.

With that said, if you're thinking about starting a new business or opening a division of your existing company in the state of Kansas, having an understanding of the economic data of the state is crucial.

Additionally, you it's also a good idea to know what type of commercial insurance policies you'll need to invest in if you operate a business in the state. Below, we provide an overview of this information so you can determine if the Sunflower State is the right place for your business endeavor.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Kansas

In regard to job growth, the state of Kansas exceeds the national average. As of December, 2019, the unemployment rate was 3.2%, reports the Bureau of Labor Statistics; that's 0.3% lower than the national unemployment rate, which was 3.5% at the same time.

The rate has remained relatively steady, as it was 3.3% in December of 2018 and 3.5% in January of 2018; in fact, it has slightly improved. As per economists, the workforce and the economy is considered to improve or at the very least, remain steady, in upcoming years.

The state of Kansas, overall, is considered a good location for business owners; however, there are specific areas that provide better opportunities than others. Generally, these areas are the state's largest metropolitan regions and the suburbs that surround them, including:

  • Emporia
  • Kansas City
  • Lenexa
  • Merriam
  • Mission
  • Overland Park

Not only are these cities seeing an increase in the number of new businesses, but they also have an ample workforce, as well as a higher median income, than other areas in the state.

While there are several industries that thrive in KS, there are particular sectors that tend to do better than others. These include:

  • Advanced manufacturing
  • Aerospace engineering
  • Agriculture
  • Aviation
  • Biosciences and health
  • Cattle production
  • Energy
  • Food processing
  • Logistics and distribution
  • Non-fuel industrial minerals
Commercial Insurance Requirements In Kansas

The Kansas Insurance Department regulates insurance in KS. Kansas mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Kansas requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis unless your business is involved in certain agricultural areas or has a gross annual payroll of less than $20,000. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

Kansas also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Retail Insurance

Read valuable small business retail insurance policy information. In a retail business, you need to have the right type of commercial insurance coverage so that your store, employees, and inventory are protected.


Retail Insurance

Retail stores are susceptible to premises liability claims because of customer traffic, but large department and specialty stores are more susceptible than most.

All retail stores have significant property exposures. The on-hand stock represents a considerable investment, but the amount on hand fluctuates seasonally. For this reason, physical damage insurance on this property must be arranged carefully. When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured's interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Crime insurance, in the form of employee theft and money and securities coverage, is also very important.

The businessowners policy was designed with retail exposures and operations in mind. For this reason alone, it should always be the first type of package coverage to consider. However, for those risks not eligible for the business owners policy program, the commercial package policy (CPP) is a practical and convenient way to combine a number of coverages into one policy.

Retail businesses generate income through interaction with customers. This interaction is also how a customer can sustain an injury and then sue the retailer for damages. Hazards, exposures and operations both on premises and off are important and must be covered, but liability the retailer may incur because of the merchandise sold must also be considered and insurance protection arranged.

Inventory or stock is the major property exposure for most retail operations. Because stock values tend to fluctuate or have significant peaks at certain times of the year, value reporting or peak season valuation options should be considered. Business income coverage, including business income from dependent properties coverage, may mean the difference between a retail operation staying in business or being forced into bankruptcy following a loss.

When the insured occupies a non-owned building, insurance coverage must be arranged for the insured’s interest in extensive improvements and betterments made to the premises.

Most retail businesses offer endless opportunities for a variety of criminal activities. For this reason, the coverages needed must be carefully evaluated. Holdup and robbery losses may be the most obvious concerns but employee theft, fraud and counterfeit money losses are also serious issues that cannot be dismissed.

Retail businesses are gaining greater exposure to international issues because of the growth in sales via the internet. As these sales increase, the added exposures faced by these retailers must be evaluated. While their operating horizons are expanding so are their potential loss exposures.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Bailees Customers, Goods in Transit, Jewelers Block, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Kansasa insurance agents & brokers and learn about Kansas small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including KS business insurance costs. Call us (620) 205-2115.

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