Oregon Insurance For Actuaries

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Oregon Insurance For Actuaries Policy Information

OR Insurance For Actuaries

Oregon Insurance For Actuaries. Actuaries evaluate and determine the financial consequences of risk by applying mathematical principles to quantify uncertain events, such as death, disability, injury, or loss to property.

While some projects are of a short-term nature, most involve long-term projections of rate adequacy, premium income, adequacy of loss reserves or pension plans, and investment results.

Actuaries generally work for insurance companies, rating bureaus, or regulatory agencies, but may offer their services as consultants on an independent basis.

Accredited actuaries must pass a rigorous series of exams to earn their designation through the Casualty Actuarial Society or the Society of Actuaries.

Actuaries can work in a variety of settings as employees, but many find that owning and running their own consultancy firms offers a rewarding and interesting career.

As actuaries specialize in risk assessment, nobody will need to make them aware of the hazards they will face by running their own businesses, nor tell them about the vital role comprehensive insurance coverage plays in reducing the financial consequences of the multitude of perils they could encounter.

However, if you are curious what types of Oregon insurance for actuaries coverages would be needed to protect their business, this brief guide offers some answers.

Oregon insurance for actuaries protects your actuarial firm from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do OR Actuaries Need Insurance?

While actuaries who are employed in commerce, in the non-profit sector, or in a public institution will have similar insurance needs as any other skilled professional, those actuaries who own and manage their own consultancy practices will require additional forms of coverage.

They can, after all, encounter some of the same perils as any other commercial venture - even the most seasoned risk-assessment professional will not be able to prevent all disasters from occurring.

Actuaries running their own firms will not, for example, be able to thwart acts of nature, such as wildfires, earthquakes, serious floods, or storms.

These catastrophic events beyond anyone's control can not only severe damage an actuary's office space, but also their smaller physical assets, such as computers, and at the same time force them to temporarily close their business.

Even alongside excellent safety measures, threats such as burglary, cyber theft, acts of vandalism, and accidents like fires, also remain very real.

Liability risks are another major hazard. A client could accuse an actuary of missing something important in their analysis, a computer virus that infects an actuary's machine could have far-reaching consequences for clients, or a client may be accidentally injured on an actuary's commercial premises.

In these cases, costly lawsuits are almost inevitable - but actuaries also always have to keep in mind that they can be sued even if they did not make any mistake in carrying out their professional duties.

Investing in a Oregon insurance for actuaries plan serves the purpose of safeguarding actuarial firms' financial interests - even if disaster could not be averted.

What Type Of Insurance Do Oregon Actuaries Need?

The precise nature of the coverage an ORactuary running a consultancy firm will need to protect their business is dependent on multiple factors.

The exact nature of the work, the size of the business, the number of employees, and the jurisdiction where the actuary is based all play important roles in determining the types of Oregon insurance for actuaries policies required, as well as the costs.

Consulting a commercial insurance specialist will give actuaries insights tailored to their unique circumstances, but some of the most important forms of coverage actuaries need to carry include:

  • Commercial Property - This coverage will protect your food distribution operation from third-party premises and product liability issues. For instance, if someone were to claim that the products you provided caused a foodborne illness and filed a lawsuit against you, general liability insurance would cover the related expenses.
  • Professional Liability - This type of Oregon insurance for actuaries coverage helps with legal defense cost in the case of professional liability claims - claims in which a client alleges that an actuary carried their duties out negligently, or caused active harm.
  • General Liability - Designed to cover broad liability issues, specifically third party bodily injury or property damage claims, actuaries are also likely to need this form of insurance.
  • Workers Compensation - Generally, any commercial venture that has employees requires workers' comp insurance, which covers the medical costs and lost wages for employees who sustain work-related injuries.
  • Commercial Auto - Actuaries who drive vehicles in a professional context will also be required to carry commercial auto insurance, in the event of accident, damage, or theft.

Because OR actuaries carry out diverse responsibilities, and each business has specific needs, consulting a commercial insurance broker about your particular Oregon insurance for actuaries requirements is indispensable

OR Actuary's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is often minimal since most client contact is done electronically or by mail. If clients visit the premises, they must be kept in designated areas so that they cannot view or overhear conversations regarding other clients' confidential information.

To prevent slips, trips, or falls, all areas accessible to clients must be well maintained with floor covering in good condition. The number of exits must be sufficient and be well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

Off-premises exposures include visits to clients' premises. There should be policies and training as to off-site conduct by employees. Personal injury liability exposures include allegations of assault, breach of confidentiality, discrimination, and invasion of privacy.

Professional liability exposure is extensive. The actuary determines the financial consequence of risk, projecting results from current data into the future.

Hazards increase if the firm fails to conduct thorough background checks to verify employees' credentials and education, ignores or has inadequate error checking procedures, or allows clerical workers to do tasks that only professionals should handle.

Ongoing training must be required for all employees. All assumptions used in analyses must be identified and discussed with clients. The firm should have stated procedures and must follow the standard and practices set by the American Academy of Actuaries.

Workers compensation exposure is generally limited to that of an office. Since work is done on computers, potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and similar cumulative trauma injuries that can be addressed through ergonomically designed workstations.

Some actuarial firms have significant off-site work at clients' premises for data collection, presentations, and similar activities. Employees who travel can be injured by slips and falls at clients' premises, assaults, or in automobile or aviation accidents.

Overseas exposures will require special foreign coverage. If an employee is injured in another country, the cost of returning home could be extremely high. Repatriation coverage, including air ambulance services, should be considered.

Property exposure is generally limited to that of an office. Ignition sources include wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, wear, and overheating of equipment. There may be storage of client information in paper form, although these are now often digital instead of paper format.

Storage of paper documents should be in fireproof cabinets. Fire suppression systems must not damage the papers. Computers and other electronic equipment may be targets for theft.

Inland marine exposures are from accounts receivable if the firm offers credit, computers, and valuable papers and records for clients' information. For computers, the hazards may be extensive if equipment or laptop computers are used off-premises due to the potential for theft or transportation losses.

A morale hazard may be indicated if the insured does not keep valuable papers and disks in fireproof file cabinets to protect them from smoke, water, and fire. Power failure and power surges are potentially severe hazards. Duplicates should be kept off-site to allow for re-creation in the event of a loss.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and computer fraud. The exposure can be quite serious as actuaries have access to individual customer's personal and proprietary information. Background checks should be conducted on all employees.

Hazards increase without monitoring procedures and securing all records to prevent unauthorized access. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired and non-owned. If vehicles are supplied for use by employees, there should be written procedures in place regarding personal use by employees and their family members.

All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained, and records kept in a central location.

Oregon Insurance For Actuaries - The Bottom Line

To find out more about the types of Oregon insurance for actuaries policies you'll need and how much coverage you should carry along with costs - consult with a reputable broker that is experienced in business insurance.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2021.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2021 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Professional Services Insurance

Get informed about small business professional services insurance, including Professional liability, aka errors and omissions (E&O insurance), that protects your business against claims that a professional service you provided caused your client financial loss.


Professional Services Insurance

Let's face reality. People today are claims conscious, resulting in a significant share of malpractice lawsuits against professionals.

Liability resulting from the rendering of or the failure to render professional services is excluded in most liability coverage forms. This means that a policy covering a account's or lawyers' office will cover liability arising out of the maintenance or use of the premises, but specifically exclude liability arising out of the rendering of a professional service or the omission of such a service.

In addition to the professions in which actual physical or mental injury may be caused to clients, certain other professions are exposed to claims for malpractice.

Claims may be brought against lawyers, accountants, architects, and similar professional persons for errors or omissions in their professional capacity. Errors & Omissions insurance pays damages that might be awarded to a plaintiff alleging professional negligence.

Professional liability policies are made available to such risks, and these policies provide essentially the same protection as is afforded under the physicians, surgeons or dentists professional liability policy.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Professional Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Money and Securities, Special Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Oregon insurance agents & brokers and learn about Oregon small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including OR business insurance costs. Call us (503) 610-0300.

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