Oregon Civil Engineer Insurance

Or call for your free quote:

Get the best OR small business insurance quotes online & info on cost, coverage, minimum requirements, certificates & more.

Oregon Civil Engineer Insurance Policy Information

OR Civil Engineer Insurance

Oregon Civil Engineer Insurance. Civil engineers have the exciting and rewarding job of designing, planning, and supervising the construction of a wide variety of construction projects - including, to name but a few examples, buildings, roads, bridges, parks, and harbors. A civil engineer will typically further specialize in, for instance, construction or structural engineering.

Civil engineers use higher mathematics, economics, biological, and physical sciences to design airports, bridges, buildings, harbors, highways, irrigation systems, manufacturing plants, pipelines, railroads, and tunnels.

They may specialize in construction, environmental, forensic, geotechnical, hydraulic, municipal, structural, transportation, or water resource fields. The engineer is hired by a client and may conduct research, prepare prototypes, or design specifications to meet the client's requirements.

They may test structural failures to identify problems and propose solutions.

A great many civil engineers will thrive as employees within the public or private sector, but some decide to take the plunge and start their own companies.

Owning and managing your own business within the civil engineering branch will allow you greater freedom in deciding what projects to work on, and it can be highly profitable as well.

Civil engineers who own their own business also, on the other hand, face a range of risks, each of which could prove to be financially devastating. What kinds of Oregon civil engineer insurance would be needed to protect themselves from the fallout of major perils? To find out more, keep reading.

Oregon civil engineer insurance protects your engineering firms from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do OR Civil Engineers Need Insurance?

Civil engineering firms face a variety of hazards, and even though you can reduce your risk by implementing various health, safety, and security measures, it is simply not possible to bring your risk down to zero.

Civil engineers could, at virtually any time, be impacted both by universal risks and industry-specific perils.

Your office space could, for instance, fall victim to burglary, cyber theft, or acts of vandalism, causing significant damage to, or loss of, commercial assets.

On an even larger scale, the threat of acts of nature, like earthquakes, hurricanes, lightning strikes, or other severe weather events also has to be considered.

OR civil engineers who employ others face the risk that a worker will become injured on the job, and if clients visit you in your office space, an injury on their part could lead to a costly lawsuit, too.

Another serious risk lies in the possibility that a client accuses you of being negligent in carrying out your job, which, especially if such as claim includes bodily injury or serious property damage, can cause costs so massive that they could easily be bankrupting in nature.

Only a solid Oregon civil engineer insurance plan, which provides coverage for all the major perils you face, can shield a civil engineer with a private business from the financial disaster these and other unforeseen circumstances would otherwise bring.

That is why it is vital to evaluate your insurance needs with great care.

What Type Of Insurance Do Oregon Civil Engineers Need?

Civil engineering is a broad and diverse profession. Your insurance needs will be influenced by the same factors that make your business unique - the exact nature of the work you do, the OR location where you are based, the size of your business, and how many employees you have.

A commercial insurance broker who understands your field should be consulted to make sure all eventualities are covered. Some of the most important kinds of Oregon civil engineer insurance include, however:

  • Commercial Property - Your commercial building, your assets within it, and any equipment you have rented, could all be lost or suffer severe damage if your company is affected by an act of nature, theft, or vandalism. This form of insurance will cover a substantial portion of the resulting expenses.
  • Commercial General Liability - Whether a visitor to your premises is injured, or your company's activities accidentally cause damage to property belonging to someone else, you can face costly litigation. General liability insurance covers your attorney fees, settlement costs, and other legal expenses.
  • Errors And Omissions - This type of Oregon civil engineer insurance coverage will help you deal with the financial fallout of claims that you made errors in your job or performed your duties negligently, even if the claim is later found to be baseless. As these kinds of claims are not uncommon for civil engineers, this form of coverage - also called professional liability insurance - is essential.
  • Workers' Compensation - You will generally require workers' compensation insurance if you have employees. These policies protect you and your employees in case of a work-related injury or occupational illness (resulting from exposure to harmful substances, for example). The injured employee's medical bills and any lost wages are taken care of, and in turn the risk of lawsuits is reduced.

Although these important types of Oregon civil engineer insurance will certainly make running an engineering firm less uncertain, you may also require additional forms of coverage - such as commercial auto, cyber, or environmental liability insurance.

Ask a seasoned commercial insurance agent for further details.

OR Civil Engineer's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is limited at the engineer's location. If customers visit the premises, they must be confined to designated areas that are free of obstacles with floor coverings in good condition. The number of exits must be sufficient and well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

Off-site exposures consist of visits to customers' premises and job sites. There should be procedures in place for enforcement of rules regarding off-site conduct by employees.

Professional liability exposure is extensive due to the catastrophic potential for injury and death from an error in design that results in structural failures, such as the collapse of an interstate bridge or high-rise.

The exposure increases if the firm fails to conduct thorough background checks to verify employees' accreditations, education, and licensing, permit clerical workers to do tasks that only professionals should handle, or if error checking procedures are ignored or are inadequate.

All design specifications must be followed, and inspections regularly conducted. Documentation must be clear, with changes marked and authorizations signed by both the engineer and the customer.

Agreements with clients, including fee arrangements, should be in writing. Customers can suffer financial loss due to construction delays and cost overruns. Other exposures include allegations of breach of a client's confidentiality or a conflict of interest.

Workers compensation exposure is from office operations and off-site visits to customers' premises and job sites. Since work at the office is done on computers, potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and similar repetitive motion injuries that can be reduced with ergonomically designed workstations.

Off-site exposures may include working at construction sites, at heights, on rough terrain, or in isolated areas. Engineers can be injured off-site by slips and falls, falling objects, falls from heights, electrical panels and wiring, construction machinery, flying debris, noise, foreign objects in the eye, assault, and automobile or aviation accidents. Protective equipment may be required.

Property exposure is primarily that of an office. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, wear, and overheating of equipment. The storage of paper reference materials and customers' records may add to the fire load.

Storage should be in fireproof file cabinets, and fire suppression systems must not damage the papers. Computers and other electronic equipment may be targets for theft.

Inland marine exposure consists of accounts receivable if the firm offers credit, computers, and valuable papers and records for clients' information, proposals, prototypes, final specifications, and work in progress.

Computers generally have expensive hardware and software designed specifically for engineering applications. Power failure and power surges are potentially severe hazards. Computer systems must have adequate security features to prevent unauthorized access due to industrial espionage or by hackers. Duplicates must be made often and stored off-site.

Storage on premises should consist of fireproof cabinets. There may be an off-premises exposure if engineers take tools and equipment to customers' job sites.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty, which can be very high as engineers possess unique access to customers' proprietary information. Potential for theft, particularly industrial espionage, is great. Background checks should be conducted on all employees.

Monitoring procedures and securing of all records should be enforced to prevent unauthorized access to client information. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements. Employee dishonesty issues may arise when an employee is on a client's premises.

Business auto exposure comes from the vehicles used to travel to visit customers and job sites. Generally, the vehicles are private passenger types or pickups. Engineers may use rental cars when proceedings are not local.

If vehicles are supplied to employees, there should be written guidelines regarding the personal and permitted use of the vehicle. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and records kept in a central location.

Oregon Civil Engineer Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the exact types of Oregon civil engineer insurance policies you'll need, and how much coverage to get and the premiums, speak with a reputable business insurance broker.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2021.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2021 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Professional Services Insurance

Get informed about small business professional services insurance, including Professional liability, aka errors and omissions (E&O insurance), that protects your business against claims that a professional service you provided caused your client financial loss.


Professional Services Insurance

Let's face reality. People today are claims conscious, resulting in a significant share of malpractice lawsuits against professionals.

Liability resulting from the rendering of or the failure to render professional services is excluded in most liability coverage forms. This means that a policy covering a account's or lawyers' office will cover liability arising out of the maintenance or use of the premises, but specifically exclude liability arising out of the rendering of a professional service or the omission of such a service.

In addition to the professions in which actual physical or mental injury may be caused to clients, certain other professions are exposed to claims for malpractice.

Claims may be brought against lawyers, accountants, architects, and similar professional persons for errors or omissions in their professional capacity. Errors & Omissions insurance pays damages that might be awarded to a plaintiff alleging professional negligence.

Professional liability policies are made available to such risks, and these policies provide essentially the same protection as is afforded under the physicians, surgeons or dentists professional liability policy.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Professional Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Money and Securities, Special Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Oregon Civil Engineer insurance quote in Albany, Ashland, Astoria, Aumsville, Baker, Bandon, Beaverton, Bend, Boardman, Brookings, Burns, Canby, Carlton, Central Point, Coos Bay, Coquille, Cornelius, Corvallis, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dallas, Damascus, Dayton, Dundee, Eagle Point, Estacada, Eugene, Fairview, Florence, Forest Grove, Gervais, Gladstone, Gold Beach, Grants Pass, Gresham, Happy Valley, Harrisburg, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Hubbard, Independence, Jacksonville, Jefferson, Junction, Keizer, King, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Lafayette, Lake Oswego, Lakeview town, Lebanon, Lincoln, Madras, McMinnville, Medford, Milton-Freewater, Milwaukie, Molalla, Monmouth, Mount Angel, Myrtle Creek, Myrtle Point, Newberg, Newport, North Bend, Nyssa, Oakridge, Ontario, Oregon, Pendleton, Philomath, Phoenix, Portland, Prineville, Redmond, Reedsport, Rogue River, Roseburg, Salem, Sandy, Scappoose, Seaside, Shady Cove, Sheridan, Sherwood, Silverton, Sisters, Springfield, St. Helens, Stanfield, Stayton, Sublimity, Sutherlin, Sweet Home, Talent, The Dalles, Tigard, Tillamook, Toledo, Troutdale, Tualatin, Umatilla, Union, Veneta, Vernonia, Waldport, Warrenton, West Linn, Willamina, Wilsonville, Winston, Wood Village, Woodburn and all other OR cities & Oregon counties near me in The Beaver State.

Also find Oregon insurance agents & brokers and learn about Oregon small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including OR business insurance costs. Call us (503) 610-0300.

Free Business Insurance Quote Click Here