YMCA Insurance

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YMCA Insurance Policy Information

YMCA Insurance

YMCA Insurance. The YMCA has been helping people to improve their health and minds for over a 100 years now - and this massive non-profit organization is currently active in 120 different countries.

Young Men's Christian Associations offer a wide range of facilities for individual and team physical fitness activities, including cardiovascular equipment, dance and exercise classes, gyms, playgrounds, rock climbing walls, swimming pools, tennis courts, and weight rooms.

Other services offered may include daycare, educational classes, hot tubs, saunas, and tanning beds. The center may provide locker rooms for members or guests. Counseling services and board and room facilities may be available.

Special events, such as birthday parties or youth "lock-ins", may be offered to the general public. Many YMCAs offer activities for youth, including both day and overnight camps. YMCAs are nonprofit organizations, with both paid employees and volunteers. Funding is through membership fees, fee-for-use, and donations.

Founded as the Young Men's Christian Association, "the Y", as it's often affectionately called, is most well-known for its accommodation (such as youth hostels) and its gyms. The YMCA's activities stretch far beyond these, however, as it also organizes camping trips and educational programs.

Each of the YMCA's local organizations is semi-autonomous - and will have to carefully evaluate what types of risks they face as they strive to serve their members and wider communities.

Should a YMCA organization be impacted by a significant peril, the right insurance can easily make the difference between continued success and financial ruin. What kinds of YMCA insurance might local Y branches require, though? To find out more, keep reading.

YMCA insurance protects your local branch from lawsuits with rates as low as $107/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked YMCA insurance questions:


How Much Does YMCA Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for YMCAs ranges from $107 to $139 per month based on location, membership size, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do YMCA Chapters Need Insurance?

YMCA

Like any other business or non-profit, YMCA venues are vulnerable to a range of hazards that could end with serious property damage, temporary closure of the venue, and even lengthy and costly lawsuits. While only certain types of insurance are legally mandated, others serve simply to help you manage the financial aftermath of a disaster.

Natural disasters, which can be as varied as earthquakes, floods, wildfires, or hurricanes, are a prime example of unforeseen events that are likely to cause significant property damage. Even accidents - like fires - can lead to hefty bills, along with criminal acts such as theft and vandalism. Furthermore, it is always possible that important equipment the YMCA relies on in its activities suddenly breaks down, requiring replacement.

Liability risks are another major threat. Employees, members, donors, or anyone else visiting the premises being injured and then suing the YMCA is one example. This can happen in a multitude of different ways, from injury due to malfunctioning gym equipment to slipping on a wet floor. YMCA organizations may also inadvertently cause damage to third party property, such as vehicles, buildings, or even valuable personal items.

With the right YMCA insurance plan on your side, you can rest assured that such mishaps do not have to inflict terrible financial damage. A good insurance plan covers a large portion of the costs associated with most types of perils, and sometimes even the full expense.


What Type Of Insurance Do YMCA Chapters Need?

The fact that the modern insurance market offers so many different options means protection is available for almost any peril - but it also makes evaluating what kinds of coverage a YMCA branch might need challenging.

Factors like the exact nature of the venue's activities, it location, and its number of employees all influence what forms of insurance are beneficial. Because not every YMCA venue has the same insurance needs, it is vital to talk to a seasoned insurance broker to find out what policies you should invest in.

Some of the kinds of YMCA insurance that local Y branches are most likely to need, however, include:

  • Commercial Property - Property insurance covers your physical building as well as its contents in case of perils such as theft, fire, vandalism, and acts of nature. Outdoor properties, such as camping grounds, can also be insured under these policies, which will compensate you for a significant portion of repair and replacement costs after a catastrophic event.
  • General Liability - Important for commercial and non-profit ventures alike, general liability insurance helps manage the costs associated with third party property damage or bodily injury claims. The type of YMCA insurance covers attorney fees, court fees, medical bills, and settlement costs can all be covered. Note that general liability coverage excludes athletic activities, for which you will additionally need athletic participation insurance if your activities include running a gym.
  • Workers' Compensation - Employees may be injured at work in a variety of ways - they may sustain cuts or fractures while fixing equipment, for instance, or even need surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome after many hours of desk work. If the YMCA can be held responsible for an injury that takes place on its premises, workers' comp covers the employee's medical bills and any wages they lose while they recover.

Although these kinds of coverage form the backbone of any comprehensive insurance plan, YMCA branches may have further needs - such as cyber insurance and auto insurance.

Discuss your risk profile and the kinds of YMCA insurance coverage that best protect you from the risks you face with an insurance broker specializing in the non-profit sector.


YMCA Organization's Risks & Exposures

The YMCA

Premises liability exposure is high due to the large numbers of visitors on premises and their participation in physical activity. Visitors may slip, trip, or fall, be injured while participating in athletic activities or while using athletic equipment or drown in swimming pools. Public and life safety code compliance is very important. Flooring should be well maintained with nonskid surfaces.

Adequate lighting, marked exits, and egress are mandatory. Steps must have handrails, be well-lit, marked, and well maintained. Parking areas should be maintained free of snow and ice. All exercise equipment should be tested and maintained regularly with documentation.

Training information must be clearly marked for all users. Age restrictions should be posted and enforced. Swimming pools should be fenced, with a self-closing gate and depths clearly marked. Drains should be protected to prevent entrapment. Pool rules should be prominently displayed. A lifeguard should be on duty when the pool is open. Lifesaving equipment should be accessible at all times.

Playground equipment must be properly maintained and documented. Workers should be trained in emergency response, particularly in how to respond to heart attacks and drowning. There must be adequate security at the facility, including inside the building, corridors, and any owned parking area.

Criminal background checks should be conducted for any employee supervising children or youth. Camps and overnights must be fully staffed and supervised. The center may present an attractive nuisance hazard after hours. There must be adequate security to prevent unauthorized entry. Some camps may use volunteers rather than employees in many positions.

These volunteers should be subject to the same background checks as employees and receive similar training. Volunteer injuries are often not covered under workers compensation, so accident and health policies may be appropriate. Personal injury exposures include allegations of assault or battery, discrimination, and invasion of privacy.

Abuse and molestation exposure is very high due to activities including children and other at-risk individuals. No coverage is available for the abuser. While there is some coverage available in the standard market for the institution where the abuse takes place, it may be very restricted.

More complete coverage should be purchased through specialized markets. The institution must take all possible care to protect children and at-risk individuals from predatory adults and older children through criminal background checks, training, monitoring and supervision, and reporting all allegations of abuse to the proper authorities.

Directors and officers exposure is moderate. Policies and procedures should be published and consistently followed, especially as they relate to membership, membership revocation, the election of officers, and removal of officers.

Workers compensation exposure is moderate. Slips, trips, falls, and back injuries from lifting are common. Fitness trainers may be injured while participating in athletic activities or while using the equipment. Lifeguards may slip on wet surfaces, be injured by flailing swimmers, or drown.

If there is a concession stand, workers can experience cuts or burns. Custodians can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals to maintain the pool and floors.

Exposure to communicable disease can be high. All employees should have up-to-date immunizations to prevent the spread of communicable disease. Campground and overnight activities may be conducted on uneven terrains, increasing the potential for slips, trips or falls, contact with insects or animals, or interventions with campers.

Property exposure is moderate. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, air conditioning and heating, systems, and cooking equipment. Electrical wiring must be well maintained and up to code for its current use. All exercise machines must be checked for wear and tear and maintained to prevent fires.

If there is cooking, the kitchen must be set up with appropriate controls. Smoking should not be permitted on premises. Fire extinguishers must be conveniently placed throughout the facility. Housekeeping must be excellent with regular trash pickup.

Adult supervision is required for all activities for children and youth. Liquids used to maintain floors and chemicals used for the pool are flammable and should be stored safely away from combustibles.

The facility may be a target for vandalism and theft when not in use. If occupancy is seasonal, daily visits must be made to check on its condition. Business income may be high after a loss due to the unavailability of backup facilities.

Crime exposure comes from employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities. Coverage should be expanded to include faithful performance and volunteers and committee members. Background checks should be conducted on all employees and volunteers handling money.

There should be a division of duties between persons handling money and reconciling bank statements. Two employees or volunteers should verify cash collections as registrations for camps or classes and admissions to fund-raising events may result in a large buildup of cash.

Money should be regularly collected and moved away from the collection area, preferably to a safe. Regular deposits must be made. No money should be kept on the premises overnight.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable for dues and other fee services, computers for grant documentation and individual training programs, and valuable papers and records for charters, contracts, deeds, and membership records. All papers, records, and electronic data should be duplicated and a copy stored off site for easy restoration in the event of a loss.

Bailees coverage should be considered for guests' clothing and items left in locker rooms or under the direct control of employees. Contractors' equipment may be used to maintain the premises. Property may be taken off premises and used for situations such as swim teams, gym teams, and off-site fundraisers.

Commercial auto exposure may be limited to hired and non-owned for employees and volunteers running errands. If transportation is provided for sports teams or children attending camps, the exposure increases. All drivers must have the appropriate license for the vehicle being driven and acceptable MVRs.

There must be clear standards regarding who can drive the vehicles and under what circumstances. If children are being transported, an additional adult for supervision is helpful. Vehicles must be maintained with records kept in a central location.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 7997 Membership Sports And Recreation Clubs
  • NAICS CODE: 713940 Fitness and Recreational Sports Centers
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 49870
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 9015, 9063

Description for 7997: Membership Sports And Recreation Clubs

Division I: Services | Major Group 79: Amusement And Recreation Services | Industry Group 799: Miscellaneous Amusement And Recreation

7997 Membership Sports And Recreation Clubs: Sports and recreation clubs which are restricted to use by members and their guests. Country, golf, tennis, yacht, and amateur sports and recreation clubs are included in this industry. Physical fitness facilities are classified in Industry 7991.

  • Aviation clubs, membership
  • Baseball clubs except professional and semiprofessional
  • Bathing beaches, membership
  • Beach clubs, membership
  • Boating clubs, membership
  • Bowling leagues or teams, except professional and semiprofessional
  • Bridge clubs, membership
  • Club, membership: sports and recreation, except physical fitness
  • Country clubs, membership
  • Flying fields maintained by aviation club
  • Football club, except professional and semiprofessional
  • Golf clubs, membership
  • Gun clubs, membership
  • Handball clubs, membership
  • Hockey clubs, except professional and semiprofessional
  • Hunt clubs, membership
  • Racquetball clubs, membership
  • Recreation and sports club, membership: except physical fitness
  • Riding clubs, membership
  • Shooting clubs, membership
  • Soccer clubs, except professional and semiprofessional
  • Sports and recreation clubs, membership: except physical fitness
  • Swimming clubs, membership
  • Tennis clubs, membership
  • Yacht clubs, membership

YMCA Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the specific types of YMCA insurance policies you'll need to protect your branch, employees and the people you serve - including how much coverage you should carry and associated premium costs - consult with a reputable agent that is experienced in commercial insurance.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Non-Profit Insurance

Find useful articles on business insurance for non-profit 501(c)(3) organizations, charities and associations.


Non-Profit Insurance

For 501(c) Non-Profits - Directors And Officers Liability Insurance has become an increasingly important policy to have. D&O coverage protects insured directors or officers against claims involving allegations of wrongful acts occurring while performing their duties as such. The insurance is divided into two separate coverages:

Side A coverage reimburses the individual directors and officers for payments made for loss each has incurred because of wrongful acts.

Side B coverage reimburses the corporation for the payments it has made on behalf of the directors or officers themselves.

General Liability is a foundational policy for almost any business. Most companies do not have any control over the final cost of injuries to a person injured because of their operations, products, or services. The person injured may be a young child, a blue-collar worker, a surgeon, or a homeless person.

The cost of the injuries may be comparatively minor or run into the millions of dollars, depending on the person and the extent of his or her injuries. Do you have sufficient assets to pay such a loss?

Commercial general liability insurance is designed to help you protect your assets with three main coverages:

  • Coverage A: Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability
  • Coverage B: Personal and Advertising Injury Liability
  • Coverage C: Medical Payments

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Directors and Officers Liability, Employee Benefits, Professional, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Fine Arts, Musical Instruments, Commercial Articles Floater, Computers, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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