Salvation Army Insurance Alaska

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Salvation Army Insurance Alaska Policy Information

AK Salvation Army Insurance

Salvation Army Insurance Alaska. As an international charitable and religious organization, the Salvation Army is dedicated to helping those in need in a wide variety of ways.

The Salvation Army is a religious organization that preaches the gospel by providing social services such as food, clothing, shelter, and transportation to individuals and families impacted by local or national disasters. While locally based, they may respond to calls for assistance elsewhere in the United States or sometimes overseas.

The Salvation Army may offer ongoing programs such as counseling, food kitchens, housing, or transportation to clients. Some have special programs for prisoners, disabled, elderly, or homeless clients. Assistance is available for locating missing persons.

The Salvation Army is a church. It is nonprofit and funded primarily through donations and fundraising activities. Some Salvation Army chapters operate retail outlets to sell used items as a permanent fundraising operation.

Facilities for offices, retail stores, and warehouses may be owned or leased from others. A large portion of labor may be voluntary.

AK Salvation Army thrift stores play an important role in the organization's activities, by not just offering an assortment of budget-friendly goods, but also providing jobs. A portion of the revenue the Salvation Army receives from its thrift stores in turn goes back to the community by funding emergency efforts.

As organizations dedicated to assisting less fortunate people, it is crucial for Salvation Army thrift stores to also consider the risks that may stand in their way. Because a number of unforeseen circumstances could jeopardize the future of any Salvation Army store, investing in the right insurance is absolutely essential.

What kinds of Salvation Army insurance Alaska coverage might be needed, and what hazards might they face? Read on to find answers to these questions.

Salvation Army insurance Alaska protects the local organizations from lawsuits with rates as low as $87/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Alaska Salvation Army Locations Need Insurance?

Engaging in a quick mental exercise is sufficient to reveal what types of perils a AK Salvation Army thrift store might face. What is the worst that could happen? The store could be struck by an act of nature - and depending on the location, that might be a wildfire, earthquake, or hurricane, among other possibilities.

An electrical malfunction could lead to a fire. A used product sold in the store may end up causing physical injury to a consumer. A store employee could be injured at work, in mundane daily activities like mopping a floor, or even in an armed robbery - because crime, too, poses a serious threat.

All of these perils are accompanied by significant financial losses, in the form of, to name some examples, repair or replacement costs, medical bills, and lawsuits. Although a Salvation Army store may be able to cover costs incurred as the result of minor hazards on its own, larger perils can be devastating.

Fortunately, armed with Salvation Army insurance Alaska designed for the non-profit sector, any challenges faced instantly become much more manageable.

What Type Of Insurance Do AK Salvation Army's Need?

Salvation Army stores will need to carry several different types of insurance. The exact nature of the policies they require, as well as the cost, depend on factors that include the location and size of the store, its number of employees, and the type of equipment it relies on.

Consulting an insurance broker who is deeply familiar with the needs of charitable and non-profit organizations is a crucial step on the path towards obtaining the insurance coverage that will protect a Salvation Army store from all major perils.

With that in mind, the following are examples of invaluable types of Salvation Army insurance Alaska:

  • Commercial Property: This type of insurance provides a barrier that protects you from financial losses stemming from unforeseen events like storms, fires, and burglary. It covers the physical building, but also assets therein, such as inventory, cash registers, and computers.
  • General Liability: Designed to protect you if someone were to file a lawsuit claiming that they sustained bodily injury or property damage on your premises or as a result of your activities, this type of Salvation Army insurance Alaska is essential for any commercial or non-profit venture.
  • Product Liability: This type of coverage helps you manage costs arising from liability claims pertaining directly to products you sell; something that is especially important for stores selling used items about which they may not know everything.
  • Workers Compensation: When an employee becomes injured at work under circumstances for which you could be held at least partially responsible, this type of insurance makes sure their medical bills and any lost wages are covered.

Salvation Army thrift store will want to be mindful of the fact that each policy varies; two policies with the same name do not necessarily cover the same eventualities.

Salvation Army insurance Alaska needs may also exceed the examples covered here; you may require cyber insurance to protect your digital records, and auto insurance to cover your vehicles, for instance.

It is, therefore, vital to consult a skilled insurance broker to find out what types of coverage your individual store will benefit from.

AK Salvation Army's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is moderate due to the number of visitors. Facilities include locations for worship, donations, processing, warehouses, retail stores, and residential facilities. The worship activities are similar to any church so there must be concern about public accessibility and slip and fall hazards must be minimized. Donation locations must be easily accessible for convenient drop-off, with security to prevent unauthorized access while the premises is closed.

Processing and warehouse operations have limited premises exposure due to lack of public access. Retail operations have frequent visitors who can be injured by slips and falls. Aisles must be adequate and free of debris with flooring in good condition, no frayed or worn spots on carpet, and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked.

Sufficient exits must be provided and be well marked with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Heavier items such as appliances should be kept on easily-reached shelves so that customers do not pull items down on themselves. Residential facilities must be equipped with hard-wired smoke detectors in each unit. Safety and security of each client is critical.

As with the retail operations, flooring must be in good condition, and sufficient exits provided with backup lighting in the case of emergency. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. There should be appropriate security for the area. If the business is open after dark, lighting must be adequate.

At disaster sites, exposures can be high due to emergency operations where volunteers are brought together to aid in recovery.

Shelters may be set up in remote locations without adequate utility services. The shelter must be secure for those in its care. Because the public is being served, life safety concerns are critical.

If there are camps or other children's activities, instructors must be trained in appropriate methods of caring for the safety of the children. If janitorial services or other operations are performed off-premises, property damage may result to customers' property.

Personal injury exposures include violating the privacy of clients, libel, and slander, wrongful eviction, or invasion of the right of private occupancy of a living unit.

Abuse and molestation exposure is very high due to the supervision of children and other at-risk individuals. No coverage is available for the abuser. While there is some coverage in the standard market for the institution where the abuse takes place, it is very restricted.

More complete coverage should be purchased for the institution through specialized markets. The institution must do everything necessary to protect clients from predatory employees and volunteers through criminal background checks, training, monitoring, and supervision, and report all allegations of abuse to the proper authorities.

Shelters must be monitored to prevent incidents of client-on-client abuse.

Directors' and officers' exposure can be substantial. There should be published policies and procedures that are consistently followed, especially as they relate to membership, membership revocation, the election of officers, and removal of officers.

Products exposure can be high if the institution restores and repairs donated items. Since extensive modification may take place, the organization could be considered the manufacturer of an item that causes damage.

Professional exposure could be extensive depending on services provided. The assistance to at-risk individuals may include evaluations by psychologists and psychiatrists. The most serious situations will relate to children, criminal offenders and alcohol/drug rehabilitation counselors. Physical and occupational therapists may be on staff to assist in the development of clients' job-related motor skills.

Professional liability exposure could be extensive depending on services provided. Professional employees could include medical doctors, nurses, and ancillary medical specialties. Employees and volunteers working at blood banks should be appropriately certified.

Workers compensation exposure includes clerical employees who may develop repetitive motion injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome, warehouse and retail store workers who can slip and fall or incur back injuries from lifting, and custodians who can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals to maintain the premises.

Warehouse employees should be instructed in proper lifting techniques. Safety equipment should be provided as necessary. Work with prisoners can be particularly hazardous as workers may be assaulted or killed. Health care workers should be trained in the proper handling of bodily fluids.

Shelter house workers must be able to handle unruly individuals and may be exposed to contagious disease from clients. Camp workers must be trained to handle outdoor emergency situations such as drowning, falls in rough terrains, and incidents with animals or insects.

Drivers must be trained in driving the vehicles, plus methods of loading and unloading of passengers and goods. There is a special concern with working with the disabled because of the potential for making an already difficult physical situation worse.

Clients must be supplied with appropriate safety gear and be adequately supervised based on the type of job and the level of disability. Handling donations may include exposure to hazardous substances, insects or vermin, or communicable diseases.

Property exposures include offices, donation centers, processing locations, retail stores, and warehouses. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating, and air conditioning systems. Operations may be conducted from older church buildings. All heating and electrical wiring should be up to date and meet current codes for the occupancy.

Warehouse storage should have proper shelving, wide aisle-ways and separation of flammables from combustibles. Cleaning and mending clothing can produce dust which adds to fire loads. Restoration of furniture will include flammable liquids such as adhesives, paint, and varnish. Work on donated automobiles may involve the use of grinding, spray painting or welding. These must be conducted away from combustibles.

When food services are provided, there should be controls such as automatic shut-off devices and temperature controls in place and maintained. Valuation of the donated items at the time of loss could be a concern and should be considered when coverage is written.

Donation centers may be targets for thieves or vandals. Adequate security should be in place after hours to deter pilferage or dumping.

Crime exposure comes from employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities, particularly from cash drawers in retail stores. Background checks should be conducted on all employees and volunteers handling money. Employee dishonesty coverage should be expanded to include volunteers as employees.

Money should be regularly collected and moved away from the collection area, preferably to a safe on premises. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements.

Bank drops should be made throughout the day to prevent a buildup of cash on premises. Audits should be periodically conducted, preferably by an outside firm.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable for fee-services and promised monetary donations, computers, goods in transit, and valuable papers and records for client information, donor lists, and documentation for government and private grants.

All records must be duplicated and kept off site for easy restoration in the event of a loss. Goods in transit include donated goods to be resold and items transported to emergency sites.

Business auto exposure is moderate due to the transportation of donated goods from collection centers to processing centers to warehouses to retail stores. If the organization transports clients, including disabled persons, the exposure increases.

Any driver must be licensed for the type of vehicle being driven and have an acceptable MVR. Vehicles must be maintained, with records kept at a central location.

Salvation Army Insurance Alaska - The Bottom Line

The right Salvation Army insurance Alaska coverage is vital for protecting the local AK operations. To find out what types of options are available including how much coverage you should have and how much the premiums will be, speak to a reputable business insurance agent.

Alaska Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Alaska

If you're an entrepreneur who is thinking about starting a business in Alaska, it's important to have a basic understanding of the state's overall economy before you set up shop. Regardless of how high-quality the products and services you are planning on offering may be, if the location where you open your organization doesn't offer a target market that your products and services will appeal to, chances of success are slim. Furthermore, if a workforce isn't available to support your business, you'll have a hard time staying afloat.

With that said, it's important for business-minded individuals who are thinking about starting a company in Alaska to familiarize themselves with the state's economy; it's also a good idea to have an understanding of the commercial insurance requirements.

Following is an overview of economic trends and commercial insurance policies that business owners are required to carry in The Last Frontier.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Alaska

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in Alaska was 6.1% in December of 2019. While that's significantly higher than the national unemployment rate, which was 3.4% in December, 2019, it's lower than it was one year prior, when the rate of unemployment was 6.5% in December of 2018. Though the workforce is growing slower than it is in other states, economists do predict that the rate will continue to decline in the coming years.

Despite Alaska's remoteness and cold climate, it's actually a great start to start a business. According to the Tax Foundation, Alaska is the second most tax-friendly state for business owners in the United States, as there's no individual income tax or state sales tax. Additionally, Alaska has the second highest rate of new business owners, as well as the second highest percentage of available employees (as per 2016).

As in most states, the best spots to start a business in Alaska are the state's biggest cities and the surrounding areas. This includes Anchorage, Juneau, and Fairbanks. Other key areas that are seeing a boost in business development in recent years include Homer, Sitka, Prudhoe Bay, and Ketchikan.

While there are several industries that are experiencing growth in The Last Frontier, specific sectors thrive more than others. Businesses that are related to the following industries are booming in AK:

  • Fishing, which is also one of the largest contributors to the state's economy.
  • Mining, which provides more than 4,500 jobs in Alaska.
  • Petroleum, which is responsible for 34% of jobs in the state. In fact, Prudhoe Bay is North America's largest oil field.
  • Tourism is the second largest private sector employer in the state. Each year, millions of people from around the globe travel to Alaska to marvel at the numerous natural wonders that can be found here.
Commercial Insurance Requirements In Alaska

The Alaska Division of Insurance regulates insurance in AK. Alaska mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Alaska requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

Alaska also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Non-Profit Insurance

Find useful articles on business insurance for non-profit 501(c)(3) organizations, charities and associations.


Non-Profit Insurance

For 501(c) Non-Profits - Directors And Officers Liability Insurance has become an increasingly important policy to have. D&O coverage protects insured directors or officers against claims involving allegations of wrongful acts occurring while performing their duties as such. The insurance is divided into two separate coverages:

Side A coverage reimburses the individual directors and officers for payments made for loss each has incurred because of wrongful acts.

Side B coverage reimburses the corporation for the payments it has made on behalf of the directors or officers themselves.

General Liability is a foundational policy for almost any business. Most companies do not have any control over the final cost of injuries to a person injured because of their operations, products, or services. The person injured may be a young child, a blue-collar worker, a surgeon, or a homeless person.

The cost of the injuries may be comparatively minor or run into the millions of dollars, depending on the person and the extent of his or her injuries. Do you have sufficient assets to pay such a loss?

Commercial general liability insurance is designed to help you protect your assets with three main coverages:

  • Coverage A: Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability
  • Coverage B: Personal and Advertising Injury Liability
  • Coverage C: Medical Payments

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Directors and Officers Liability, Employee Benefits, Professional, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Fine Arts, Musical Instruments, Commercial Articles Floater, Computers, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Alaska insurance agents & brokers and learn about Alaska small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including AK business insurance costs. Call us (907) 531-9001.

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