Interior Decorator Insurance Maine

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Interior Decorator Insurance Maine Policy Information

ME Interior Decorator Insurance

Interior Decorator Insurance Maine. Interior decorators and designers work with residential or commercial clients to plan the design of an interior space, room, group of rooms, or an entire building.

The design may focus on aesthetics, functionality or both. It may be purely decorative or include practical elements such as ergonomics. The interior decorator may determine the color, style, and location of furnishings, floor coverings, lighting, walls, wallpaper, window treatments and woodwork. Some assist clients with selecting paintings or other decorative artwork.

Interior decorators may arrange the purchase of furnishings, materials, and accessories needed to complete the project. Some may have significant values in storage in commercial or industrial buildings, while others function as sales representatives for suppliers. Interior decorators often need to know about construction techniques and be able to work with engineers and architects to meet local, state, and federal codes and regulations, such as those needed to properly locate stairways and exits.

As an ME interior decorator, you have an eye for design. Your clients hire you to beautify their homes and businesses so that they're visually appealing, but also functional. You're an expert at what you do; however, like other professionals in any industry, sometimes things happen that are out of your control. Mishaps can happen, and when they do, you are financially responsible for any damages that may arise.

To protect yourself from the liabilities you face, investing in the right type of insurance coverage is essential. Read on to find out more about interior decorator insurance Maine.

Interior decorator insurance Maine protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Interior Decorators Need Insurance?

Like any industry, interior decorating does come with a number of risks. You could put a massive hole in a client's wall while hanging a picture, a member of your team could be injured while positioning furniture, one of your work vans could be involved in an accident; these are just a few examples of things that could go wrong.

Damages can be quite costly. Do you have thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars to pay for repairs, medical bills, and possible litigation? Probably not; but even if you do, there's no doubt you'll suffer significant losses. That's why you need to have insurance. When something goes awry, instead of paying the costs yourself, your insurance carrier will step in and cover the expenses for you.

Interior decorator insurance Maine could potentially save you from financial ruin; not to mention the fact that you'll need to have certain policies in place in order to be compliant with the laws in your area. Certain types of coverage are mandated for business owners, and if you don't have those policies in place, you could face stiff penalties or potentially lose your business.

What Type Of Insurance Do Interior Designers Need?

The specific types of interior decorator insurance Maine you'll need depend on several factors; where your business is situated, the size of your company, and the number of people you employ, for example.

With that said, there are specific policies that you'll need, no matter what. Examples of the policies that interior designers should have include:

  • Commercial Property - This type of coverage protects your commercial space, some of the structures that surround it, and the contents inside of it (furniture, computers, etc.) from theft, vandalism, and acts of nature. For example, if a major wind storm pulls siding off of your office, commercial property insurance will cover the cost to replace it.
  • Commercial General Liability - If a client claims you damaged their property while decorating it and takes legal action, commercial liability insurance would cover the cost of litigation, as well as any damages that you may need to pay. It would also assist with the cost of any injuries third parties might sustain on your property.
  • Commercial Auto - With commercial auto insurance, the vehicles you use for work will be covered in the event that they are involved in an accident. If any other vehicles are damaged in an accident with your work van, truck, or car, this policy will also help to pay those repairs, too.
  • Business Interruption - What if a fire broke out at your office and you have to shut down operations for a while? You'd probably lose a good bit of income; but, if you have business interruption insurance, you won't have to worry, because this policy replaces any income you would lose when your operation needs to shut down for an extended period of time.
  • Workers' Compensation - As an employer, you are responsible for providing your employees with a safe work environment; that includes covering the cost of any injuries or illnesses that they may sustain while they're on the job. Workers comp will pay for any medical bills and lost wages that are associated with work-related accidents and injuries your employees sustain.

In addition to these policies, there may be several other types of Interior decorator insurance Maine coverage you might want to invest in - such as cyber liability insurance, especially if much of your business is conducted online. This coverage protects the business if any of your customer's sensitive information becomes targeted by cyber attackers who retrieve things like credit cards numbers from your files.

Maine Interior Decorating's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures are generally limited at the interior decorator's office due to lack of public access. If there is a showroom or retail sales, customers may slip and fall over displays. If the decorator acts as a general contractor and hires subcontractors on behalf of the client, the liability exposure increases. Poorly written contracts can result in liability hazards not anticipated for this classification.

Workers compensation exposure is generally limited to an office. Workstations should be ergonomically designed to prevent repetitive motion injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. If there is delivery of goods or installation of furnishings or wallcoverings, workers can incur hernias, sprains and strains from lifting, be injured in automobile accidents, by falling objects, cuts, falls, and awkward positions. If the interior decorator hires subcontractors, the workers compensation exposure increases unless all subcontractors carry their own insurance.

Property exposures may be limited to an office, but some will have storage or sales of furniture, home furnishings, and wallpaper. Electrical wiring should meet current codes for the occupancy. Fire can occur from overheating or malfunctioning of equipment. Property in storage facilities can be damaged by fire, smoke and water. Flammables kept on site should be properly labeled, separated and stored. Storage facilities can be targeted by thieves. Appropriate security controls should be taken including an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty. Background checks, including criminal history, should be performed on all employees handling money. All ordering, billing and disbursement should be handled as separate duties with reconciliations occurring regularly. Physical inventories and annual audits should be conducted.

Inland marine exposures may include accounts receivables if the interior decorator offers credit to clients, audio and visual equipment used for presentations, computers for office use, contractors' equipment and tools, fine arts, goods offsite, in transit or at exhibitions, salespersons' samples, and valuable papers and records for clients' and suppliers' information. There may be a bailees' exposure if the interior decorator purchases items on behalf of a client and stores or transports goods until delivered and installed.

Clear documentation of ownership is important. There may occasionally be an installation exposure. Decorative items and furnishings may be expensive and targets for theft. They may be highly susceptible to breakage, marring or scratching, smoke, temperature change, or water damage. Appropriate security controls should be taken including an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Professional packers may be used to reduce the potential for breakage and theft losses while the items are in transit.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to driving to and from clients' premises. If the interior decorator delivers goods, the exposure increases. MVRs for drivers must be run on a regular basis. Random drug and alcohol testing should be conducted. Vehicles must be well maintained with records kept in a central location.

ME Interior Decorator Insurance - The Bottom Line

Consult with a reputable agent that has experience in commercial insurance to find out exactly what type of coverage you should have, as well as the suggests limits on your policies that will best protect you and your decorating business.

Maine Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Maine

You have a great idea for a business and you have developed excellent products and services that you are certain people will benefit from. You've also developed a viable business plan. Now you need to choose a place to start your company.

In order for your company to be as successful as possible, you need to choose a location that offers a favorable market for your specific business. After all, if the area doesn't offer a job force to support your operation or a target market that will purchase your products and services, you likely aren't going to succeed.

With that said, if you are thinking about starting a business in Maine, having an understanding of the state's economic trends is essential. It's also important to know what type of commercial insurance you'll need to carry. Below, we offer an overview of this information so that you can determine if ME is right for your business.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Maine

Unemployment rate is a good indicator of a state's economic climate. The lower the rate, the more opportunities exist for business owners, as it suggests that there are ample job opportunities, and the more job opportunities, the more successful businesses there are in the region.

As per the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in the state of Maine was 2.9% in December, 2019; that's 0.6% lower than the national average, which was 3.5% at the same time.

Additionally, according to economists, more employment opportunities are expected in the coming years, which will further reduce the unemployment rate.

While locations throughout the state offer opportunities for business owners, there are certain locations that are ideal for entrepreneurs. These locations include:

  • Bangor
  • Bar Harbor
  • Portsmouth
  • Augusta

These cities are the largest in the Pine Tree State, so it's understandable why they offer the best opportunities for businesses. While Maine is home to multiple industries, there are specific sectors that do particularly well here, including:

  • Agriculture
  • Construction
  • Education
  • Entertainment
  • Finance and insurance
  • Healthcare
  • Hospitality and tourism
  • Information technology
  • Manufacturing
  • Professional services
  • Real estate
  • Retail
  • Transportation

Therefore, if you are considering launching a business in any of these industries, Maine is likely a good location for your company.

Commercial Insurance Requirements In Maine

The Maine Bureau of Insurance regulates insurance in ME. Maine mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Maine requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. Independent contractors do not count as employees, but if those contractors employ subcontractors, the subcontractors must be covered by a workers compensation policy.

Maine also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Arts & Recreation Insurance

Read up on small business arts and recreation commercial insurance.


Arts And Recreation Insurance

Commercial insurance policies for arts, entertainment and recreation are specialized policies that protect against the unique risks that arts and recreation businesses face.

Performing artists and companies, entertainers including musical groups, theatre groups, comedians and more, writers, performers, photographers, videographers, DJ's and so many other types.

Professional liability coverage (errors and omissions) is needed in these cases to protect their financial interests due to mistakes, errors or omissions by these professionals in doing their jobs. Fr example - a bride and groom did not like the way their wedding photos turned out.

Or a wedding planner might plan a lavish wedding, but the bride's parents who are paying for it did not like the way it went. There is a lot of gray areas with arts, and you need to be protected if your clients don't agree with you that your work was what the agreed to.

If your business is involved with children, you need to review your coverages very carefully so certain important protections are not excluded. Abuse and molestation insurance might be needed to fully protect yourself in this instance.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Income with Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Commercial Articles Floater, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Bailees Customers Floater, Money and Securities, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Interior Decorator Insurance Maine quote in Arundel, Auburn, Augusta, Bangor, Bar Harbor, Bath, Belfast, Berwick, Biddeford, Brewer, Bridgton, Brunswick, Bucksport, Buxton, Camden, Cape Elizabeth, Caribou, Casco, China, Cumberland, Dexter, Dover-Foxcroft, Durham, Eliot, Ellsworth, Fairfield, Falmouth, Fort Kent, Freeport, Fryeburg, Gardiner, Glenburn, Gorham, Gray, Greene, Hampden, Harpswell, Hermon, Hollis, Houlton, Jay, Kennebunk, Kennebunkport, Kittery, Lebanon, Lewiston, Limington, Lincoln town, Lisbon, Litchfield, Lyman, Madawaska and Wiscasset, Madison, Millinocket, Monmouth, Naples, New Gloucester, North Berwick, North Yarmouth, Norway, Oakland, Old Orchard Beach, Old Town, Orono, Orrington, Oxford, Paris, Pittsfield, Poland, Portland, Presque Isle, Raymond, Richmond, Rockland, Rumford, Sabattus, Saco, Sanford, Scarborough, Sidney, Skowhegan, South Berwick, South Portland, Standish, Topsham, Turner, Vassalboro, Waldoboro, Warren, Waterboro, Waterville, Wells, Westbrook, Wilton, Windham, Winslow and Farmington, Winterport, Winthrop, Yarmouth, York and all other cities near me in ME - The Pine Tree State.

Also find Maine insurance agents & brokers and learn about Maine small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including ME business insurance costs. Call us (207) 401-4779.

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