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Texas Dance Studio Insurance Policy Information

TX Dance Studio Insurance

Texas Dance Studio Insurance. You're passionate about dance and decided that you want to start your own studio so you can share your passion with others. You've found a great location, have your permits, the equipment is all set up, and you may have even hired a few instructors to assist you.

Before you start marketing and accepting students, there's just one more thing that you need to do: get insured.

Dance schools and studios teach the art of dance in various forms, such as ballet, ballroom, hip-hop, jazz, modern, and tap. The school may specialize in one specific type of dance or offer all types.

Some studios offer instruction in cheerleading and gymnastics. Dance schools have smooth floors, generally hardwood, with the flexibility to absorb the impact of various dance steps. There may be barres used for support, or large mirrors allowing students to visually determine that the movements are being performed correctly.

Most dance schools are privately funded through tuition charged to students. Additional revenues are from retail sales, snack bars, fees for special instruction, and admissions to special events.

Why do you need Texas dance studio insurance? What kind of coverage do you need? Below, you'll find the answers to these questions so you can protect yourself, your clients, and your staff so that you can run a successful dance studio.

Texas dance studio insurance protects your school from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Dance Studios Need Insurance?

As the owner and operator of an TX dance studio, you face many of the same risks that business owners in any other industry face. Your commercial space could be damaged in a fire, a storm, or by an act of vandalism; a vendor could trip, fall, and suffer an injury while dropping something off at your studio, or an employee could suffer a work-related injury, for example.

You also face some unique risks; for instance, a student could get hurt while participating in one of the dancing classes that you sponsor.

If any of the above-mentioned incidents occur, as the proprietor of your dance studio, you are liable and will be responsible for paying the related expenses. For example, if a client breaks their ankle during a hip hop class you teach, you'll have to pay for their medical bills, or if your building is damaged, you'll need to cover the cost of the repairs.

As you can imagine, the cost of medical bills, property damages, and if someone files a lawsuit against you, legal fees, can be exorbitant. If you aren't properly insured, you'll need to pay for these expenses out of your own pocket.

Having the right Texas dance studio insurance coverage in place can help you avoid serious financial turmoil because if something does go wrong, instead of paying the related expenses yourself, your carrier will cover them for you.

In addition to helping you avoid serious monetary losses, certain types of commercial insurance are compulsory for dance school owners of all styles of dancing, including some of the most popular types:

  1. Ballet
  2. Ballroom
  3. Contemporary
  4. Hip Hop
  5. Jazz
  6. Tap Dance
  7. Folk Dance
  8. Irish Dance
  9. Modern Dance
  10. Swing Dance

If your TX dance instructors and studio aren't insured, you could face serious fines and there's even a chance that you could lose your school of dance.

What Type Of Insurance Do Dance Schools Need?

There isn't a single policy that covers all of the insurance coverage needs that dance studio owners need. As such, you'll need to either invest in individual policies or a business owners' policy that covers the basics with additional coverages to cover the unique risks that dance studio owner's face. Examples of the type of coverage you'll need include:

  • Accidental Medical - This type of insurance is mandatory for TX dance studio owners. It covers the medical expenses that your students may require if they are injured while participating in an activity that you sponsor and they aren't insured or if their medical care will exceed the amount that their personal insurance will cover
  • General Liability - This coverage will pay for any third party liability claims that you may face. For instance, if someone who is interested in signing up for a class trips over a cord while visiting your studio, breaks a leg, and files a lawsuit against you, general liability insurance will cover the related medical care and legal fees.
  • Commercial Property - To protect the physical structure of your TX dance school, you'll need commercial property insurance. This coverage will pay for any damages that your property may develop in an act of nature (fire, storm damage, etc.) or an act of vandalism or theft. It also covers contents within your building that are damaged, as well as some of the exterior structures, such as sidewalks, lights, and signage.
  • Workers' Compensation - If you employ a staff, you are responsible for any on-the-job injuries or illnesses that they may experience. For instance, if one of your teachers is injured while teaching a class, workers' comp will cover their medical care and compensate them for any wages they may lose if they are unable to work while recovering.

The above-mentioned Texas dance studio insurance policies are just a few examples of the type of coverage you should carry as a school of dance.

TX Dance School's Risks & Exposures

Property exposure is moderate. Ignition sources include audio/visual equipment, electrical wiring, and heating and air conditioning systems. All must be well maintained and meet current codes for the occupancy. The chemicals used to maintain floors and the paints used for backdrops for shows are highly flammable. These should be stored in appropriate cabinets and kept away from combustibles.

Costumes and backdrops are susceptible to damage from fire, smoke, and water. Extinguishing equipment must be easily accessible. If there is cooking on premises, all cooking equipment must be properly protected. Housekeeping must be excellent. Business income may be needed after a loss if backup facilities are not readily available.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities. Background checks, including criminal history, should be performed on all employees handling money. All job duties, such as ordering, billing, and disbursement, should be separate and reconciled on a regular basis.

If cash is received for tuition payments, receipts should be provided. Bank deposits should be made on a timely basis to prevent the buildup of cash on premises. Books must be audited at least annually. Should students assist in collecting cash in concession stands or for special events, there must be adequate supervision to prevent pilfering.

Inland marine exposure is from accounts receivable for tuition payments, audio-visual equipment used both on and off-premises, computers used in the office and for choreography, and valuable papers and records for students' and vendors' information.

Duplicates should be made of all data and stored off premises. A theatrical property floater may be needed for the backdrops, costumes and other items necessary when the students perform off-site.

Premises liability exposures are high due to the type of instruction and the age and number of students and visitors to the premises. The adult/student ratio should be low enough to permit adequate supervision. Classrooms should be arranged so instructors can see children at all times.

Flooring should have nonskid surfaces. Slips and falls can be reduced through requiring proper footwear, maintenance of flooring, housekeeping, supervision of students, and prompt attention to spills. Sufficient exits must be provided and be well marked, with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

Communicable diseases can be spread quickly to others. Students and staff should be encouraged to wash hands regularly. Emergency procedures should be posted, with employees trained to use them. Evacuation drills should be practiced on a regular basis.

Security is important because the school is responsible for the safety of teachers, staff, students, and visitors. Entrance and exits must be controlled to prevent unauthorized access. If there are dormitories, supervisors' references must be verified, including a criminal background check, and there should be a hard-wired smoke detector in each living unit.

Personal and advertising injury exposures include allegations of copyright or patent infringement, discrimination, failure to prevent intimidation, humiliation, hazing or bullying by instructors or other students, false arrest or detention, invasion of privacy, or unauthorized or intrusive searches. Written procedures should be in place.

Abuse and molestation exposure is very high when there is care and supervision of children and young adults. No coverage is available for the abuser. While there is some coverage for the school where the abuse takes place, it is very restricted. More complete coverage should be purchased through specialized markets.

The school must take all care possible to protect students from predatory adults and older students through background checks, monitoring, and supervision, and reporting all allegations of abuse to the proper authorities.

Automobile exposure is generally limited to hired non-owned exposures due to employees running errands. If there are owned vehicles, all drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. All vehicles must be well maintained and the records kept at a central location.

Workers compensation exposures for dance instructors is high as physical interaction with students is required during classes, which can result in injuries from lifting, hernia, back sprains, and strains. Exposure to communicable disease is high when working with children. All employees should have up-to-date immunizations to prevent the spread of communicable disease. Working on costumes or staging can result in burns from welding, cuts and puncture wounds from sewing and woodworking, and lung, eye, and skin irritations from dusts, paints or solvents.

Custodians can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. If food is prepared on premises, kitchen workers can incur cuts, scalds, and burns. Instructors may travel with students for competitions or performances and may intervene to protect them from injury. Unauthorized visitors can pose a threat to employees as well as students.

Dance Studio Insurance - The Bottom Line

To find out more about the Texas dance studio insurance coverage you'll need and for help building an insurance package that will properly protect your dance school, speak with a reputable insurance agent.

Texas Economic Outlook & Requirements For Commercial Insurance

Made In Texas

If you are considering opening up a business in the Lone Star State, you first want to make sure that it is a sound location for your operations. That means that you should understand some key information related to the state's economy, as well as the types of insurance coverages that businesses are legally required to carry.

Economic Outlook For The State Of Texas

In terms of the economy, Texas offers fantastic news for those who are thinking about starting up a business in this state. That's because the Lone Star State has the second largest economy of all 50 states in the nation. The gross state product is valued at an estimated at over $1.706 trillion in 2022. In 2015, the state was the headquarters for six of the top 50 Fortune 500 companies.

As expected, several industries contribute to the economy of Texas. One of the most notable industries is agriculture. In fact, this state has the highest production of cattle, sheep, and goat products. It is also the largest producer of cotton and cereal crops. Other crops that this state is famed for include cantaloupes, watermelons, and grapefruits.

Other leading industries in the State of Texas include:

  • Aeronautics
  • Defense
  • Computer Technology
  • Energy
  • Tourism
  • Entertainment
  • Healthcare

If you are considering going into business in TX, having an operation in any of these industries will likely afford you success.

Commercial Insurance Regulations For Business Owners In TX

The Texas Department of Insurance regulates is the main insurance regulatory agency in the Lone Star State. Texas is quite lenient when it comes to insurance requirements for business owners. In fact, there is only one type of insurance that business owners are legally required to carry, and that is commercial auto insurance. If you are planning on using a vehicle for anything related to your business, whether it's making deliveries, transporting goods, or meeting with clients, you must have a commercial auto insurance policy.

While Workers' Compensation coverage is required in every other state, in TX, is it not mandated; however, if you decide not to carry this type of coverage, you will be required to offer your employees some type of incentive package in the event that the do become injured or develop a work-related illness.

Additional Resources For Contractors & Home Improvement Insurance

Learn about small business contractor's insurance, including what it covers, how much it costs - and how commercial insurance can help protect your contracting business from lawsuits.


Contractors And Home Improvement Insurance

A contractor that wants to begin or stay in business, liability coverage must be obtained for the premises or operations, off-site locations and products/completed operations exposures. These coverages may be included as a part of a businessowners policy (BOP) or purchased in a commercial general liability (CGL) policy. Owners and contractors protective liability and railroad protective liability coverages may also be required in certain cases in order for a contractor to obtain a particular job.

Physical damage coverage for tools, supplies and equipment, both on and off the contractor's premises, is a concern. Liability exposures at the premises of the contractor, and at the premises of the contractor's customer, must be properly addressed along with completed operations. Business insurance is very important as is workers compensation insurance protection for employees.

Contractors may work under a general contractor as a subcontractor in larger construction projects - like a new commercial site or residential subdivision. They can work on smaller projects directly with a home owner, usually specializing in renovations or remodels.

In business insurance speak, often called 'artisan contractors' or 'casual contractors', they are involved in many aspects of construction and contracting work – and include various trades and skills. Carpenters, painters, plumbers, electricians, roofers, tree trimmers, landscaping are just a few examples. They may do roofing, fencing, drywall, tile work and many other trades that involve skilled work with tools at the customer's premises.

An artisan contractor performs a single trade or job, and each has its own specialized liability needs with its own exposures to risk and accidents. Contractors liability insurance can offer coverage for bodily injury, property damage, advertising injury and medical payments.

Most artisan contractors should have commercial general liability at the very least, but many need broader coverages - like an umbrella to increase their limits of liability, inland marine policy to protect their tools, workers compensation if they have employees, and even commercial auto if they use vehicles for business purposes.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Contractors' Equipment and Tools, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivable, Builders Risk, Computers, Goods in Transit, Installation Floater, Valuable Papers and Records, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practicesand Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find TX local small businesses by General Liability Class Code and learn about Texas small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including TX business insurance costs. Call us (214) 999-1966.

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