Tool Grinding And Repair Insurance

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Tool Grinding And Repair Insurance Policy Information

Tool Grinding And Repair Insurance

Tool Grinding And Repair Insurance. As a tool grinder and repair contractor, you provide a valuable service to your clients; they're relying on you to maintain and repair their tools.

If you own and operate a business that employs a staff, you're also responsible for your employee's well-being, and whether you are self-employed or you run a company, you are also responsible for anything that happens to your business or incidents that may occur on your property.

Tool grinders sharpen and repair tools, blades, and implements. Grinding uses a rotating abrasive wheel to hone or straighten the exterior surface of a blade, which is then finished by polishing or buffing with a finer-grade file or leather strop.

The service can be located in individual shops, in a home basement or garage, in the appliance or department store where the tool was originally purchased, or at the manufacturer's premises. A store or manufacturer may contract with an outside operation to provide service to its customers.

The operation may make repairs at customers' premises or offer pick-up and delivery services.

While you try your very best to ensure that you provide the best results possible and ensure the safety of your facility and the people you employ (if you employ anyone), there's always a chance that something could go wrong. In the event that a mishap occurs, you could be looking at pretty hefty expenses.

How do you protect yourself from the unforeseen and the financial turmoil that may come along with it? By investing in the right type of tool grinding and repair insurance coverage, of course.

What type of insurance do tool grinders and repair technicians require? Why is being covered so important? Read on to find the answers to these questions so that you can ensure your business, the people you serve, you, and your business are properly protected.

Tool grinding and repair insurance protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked landscaper insurance questions:


How Much Does Landscaping Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small tool grinding businesses ranges from $37 to $59 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

Why Do Tool Grinders Need Insurance?

Tool Sharpening

As the saying goes, you should expect the best and prepare for the worst. Tool grinding and repair insurance coverage is your way of preparing for the worst. As a tool grinder and repair technician, you face certain risks that all business owners face; however, there are also risks that are unique to your specific industry.

For example, a vendor could be injured on your property, an employee could be involved in a work-related accident, or your commercial property could be damaged in a fire. There's also a chance that the equipment you use could malfunction and need to be repaired or replaced, or you could end up damaging the tools that a client entrusted you with.

These are just a few examples of the mishaps that could occur, and if you aren't properly insured, they could end up costing you a fortune.

If you aren't insured and something does go wrong, you'll have to pay the related expenses out of your own pocket. For example, if a client claims that you intentionally damaged their property and files a lawsuit against you, you'll not only have to pay for the legal defense fees, but you'll also have to pay for any compensation that a court may find you liable for.

With the right type of tool grinding and repair insurance coverage in place, instead of paying for these type of expenses out of your own pocket, your carrier would cover them for you.

In short, insurance coverage protects you from serious financial losses.

What Type Of Insurance Do Tool Grinding And Repair Services Need?

The specific type of coverage you'll need depends on where your business is located, the size of your operation, and the type of tools you repair; among other factors. However, regardless of the specifics of your business, there are some forms of coverage that all tool grinders and repair technicians should carry, including:

  • Commercial General Liability: This coverage protects you from third-party injury and property damage claims. For instance, if a client were to trip on a wire on your commercial property, suffer an injury, and file a lawsuit against you, this policy would cover your legal fees and any compensation that you may be responsible for.
  • Commercial Property: With this policy, your commercial building and the contents within it - tools, office equipment, etc. - as well as some exterior elements, such as sidewalks and signage - will be covered from acts of nature, vandalism, and theft. For example, if a fire broke out in your building and damaged the property and your equipment, this policy would help to pay for the repairs.
  • Inland Marine: If you do on-site maintenance or repairs, this coverage will protect your tools when they're in-transit or stored off of your property. If they're stolen, for example, while at a client's location, this policy would help to cover the cost of replacing them.

The above-mentioned tool grinding and repair insurance policies are just a few examples of the type of coverage you should carry as a tool grinder.

Tool Grinders' Risks & Exposures

Worker Using Sharpened Tool

Premises liability exposures can be moderate if customers visit the premises. Customers should not be permitted in the repair area. There should be adequate aisle space, no frayed or worn spots on the carpet, and no cracks or holes in the flooring. The number of exits should be sufficient, well marked, and have backup lighting in case of power failure.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

If the shop conducts repairs at the customer's place of business, repair persons should be trained in proper procedures to prevent premises damage, such as fire, while grinding or otherwise working on tools and implements.

Personal injury exposures include assault and invasion of privacy. Failure of the firm to run background checks and review references on employees both increases the hazard and reduces available defenses.

Product liability exposures can be high whenever work is performed on tools and implements due to the possibility of bodily injury or property damage.

Employees should be trained in proper repair procedures. Improper work can nullify warranties and transfer the responsibility for properly working products from the manufacturer to the repair operation. The products liability exposure will increase if reconditioned or used items are sold.

Environmental impairment exposures arise from the potential contamination of ground, air, and water from disposal of solvents, degreasers, metal chips, and grindings. Waste must be disposed of in an EPA approved method.

Workers compensation exposure can be extensive. Eye, skin, and lung irritations caused by chemicals, solvents, dust, and grindings are common, as are cuts, puncture wounds, foreign objects in the eye, back injuries from lifting heavy tools, and hearing loss from noise.

Safety training and protective equipment, including guards on the grinding and machining equipment, should be provided. Off-premises injuries, including trips, falls, automobile accidents, and animal attacks, can result from repair persons traveling to customers' premises.

Property exposures generally include an office, servicing area, and storage space for supplies and customers' items awaiting pickup. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, and overheating of equipment used in the grinding operation, which may produce combustible metal chips and metal dust.

If repair is done, additional exposures may include welding operations. Flammables and combustibles such as oils, solvents, and degreasers, need to be used away from the welding area. Solvents should be stored in fireproof cabinets or rooms. Theft can be a concern if the tools being repaired are high-value target items.

Appropriate security controls should be taken including physical barriers to prevent access to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty and money and securities, particularly if repair persons collect payment at the time of service.

There must be receipt procedures and monitoring to encourage accurate reporting and collection. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements.

If there is off-site work, there is the possibility of employees taking clients' property. Background checks should be conducted before permitting any employee to visit clients.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the shop offers credit, bailees customers, computers, tool floater, and valuable papers and records for customers' and vendors' information. Bailees include the goods of customers while being repaired or if the operation offers pick-up or delivery service.

Items should be padded and tied down during transit to prevent damage from breakage or collision. There must be documentation of tools received and records kept of who owns each item. Security should be appropriate for the type of tools being worked on.

Off-site exposures can be high due to the tools, equipment, and supplies carried to and possibly stored at customers' premises.

Commercial auto exposure may be limited to hired and non-owned. The exposures increases if the repair shop offers pick-up and delivery service to its customers or does repair and welding at the customer's premises.

Custom or specially designed equipment may be installed in vehicles. Drivers should have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. All vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept in a central location.

If vehicles are provided to employees, there should be a written policy regarding the personal use by employees and family members.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 7699 Repair Shops and Related Services, Not Elsewhere Classified
  • NAICS CODE: 811411 Home and Garden Equipment Repair and Maintenance
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 150630
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 3632

Description for 7699: Repair Shops and Related Services, Not Elsewhere Classified

Division I: Services | Major Group 76: Miscellaneous Repair Services | Industry Group 769: Miscellaneous Repair Shops And Related Services

7699 Repair Shops and Related Services, Not Elsewhere Classified: Establishments primarily engaged in specialized repair services, not elsewhere classified, such as bicycle repair; leather goods repair; lock and gun repair, including the making of lock parts or gun parts to individual order; musical instrument repair; septic tank cleaning; farm machinery repair; furnace cleaning; motorcycle repair; tank truck cleaning; taxidermists; tractor repair; and typewriter repair.

  • Agricultural equipment repair
  • Antique repair and restoration, except furniture and automotive
  • Awning repair shops
  • Beer pump coil cleaning and repair service
  • Bicycle repair shops
  • Binoculars and other optical goods repair
  • Blacksmith shops
  • Boiler cleaning
  • Boiler repair shops except manufacturing
  • Bowling pins, refinishing or repair
  • Camera repair shops
  • Catch basin cleaning
  • Cesspool cleaning
  • China firing and decorating to individual order
  • Cleaning and reglazing of baking pans
  • Cleaning bricks
  • Coppersmithing repair, except construction
  • Covering textile rolls
  • Dental instrument repair
  • Drafting instrument repair
  • Engine repair, except automotive
  • Farm machinery repair
  • Farriers (blacksmith shops)
  • Fire control (military) equipment repair
  • Furnace and chimney cleaning
  • Furnace cleaning service
  • Gas appliance repair service
  • Glazing and cleaning baking pans
  • Gun parts made to individual order
  • Gunsmith shops
  • Harness repair shops
  • Horseshoeing
  • Industrial truck repair
  • Key duplicating shops
  • Laboratory instrument repair, except electric
  • Lawnmower repair shops
  • Leather goods repair shops
  • Lock parts made to individual order
  • Locksmith shops
  • Luggage repair shops
  • Machinery cleaning
  • Mattress renovating and repair shops
  • Measuring and controlling instrument repair, mechanical
  • Medical equipment repair, except electric
  • Meteorological instrument repair
  • Microscope repair
  • Mirror repair shops
  • Motorcycle repair service
  • Musical instrument repair shops
  • Nautical and navigational instrument repair, except electric
  • Organ tuning and repair
  • Piano tuning and repair
  • Picture framing to individual order, not connected with retail art
  • Picture framing, custom
  • Pocketbook repair shops
  • Precision instrument repair
  • Rebabbitting
  • Reneedling work
  • Repair of optical instruments
  • Repair of photographic equipment
  • Repair of service station equipment
  • Repair of speedometers
  • Rug repair shops, not combined with cleaning
  • Saddlery repair shops
  • Scale repair service
  • Scientific instrument repair, except electric
  • Septic tank cleaning service
  • Sewer cleaning and rodding
  • Sewing machine repair shops
  • Sharpening and repairing knives, saws, and tools
  • Ship boiler and tank cleaning and repair-contractors
  • Ship scaling-contractors
  • Stove repair shops
  • Surgical instrument repair
  • Surveying instrument repair
  • Tank and boiler cleaning service
  • Tank truck cleaning service
  • Taxidermists
  • Tent repair shops
  • Thermostat repair
  • Tinsmithing repair, except construction
  • Tractor repair
  • Tuning of pianos and organs
  • Typewriter repair, including electric
  • Venetian blind repair shops
  • Window shade repair shops

Tool Grinding And Repair Insurance - The Bottom Line

To find out more about the specific types of tool grinding and repair insurance policies you'll need, how much coverage your business should carry - speak with a reputable commercial insurance broker.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Contractors & Home Improvement Insurance

Learn about small business contractor's insurance, including what it covers, how much it costs - and how commercial insurance can help protect your contracting business from lawsuits.


Contractors And Home Improvement Insurance

A contractor that wants to begin or stay in business, liability coverage must be obtained for the premises or operations, off-site locations and products/completed operations exposures. These coverages may be included as a part of a businessowners policy (BOP) or purchased in a commercial general liability (CGL) policy. Owners and contractors protective liability and railroad protective liability coverages may also be required in certain cases in order for a contractor to obtain a particular job.

Physical damage coverage for tools, supplies and equipment, both on and off the contractor's premises, is a concern. Liability exposures at the premises of the contractor, and at the premises of the contractor's customer, must be properly addressed along with completed operations. Business insurance is very important as is workers compensation insurance protection for employees.

Contractors may work under a general contractor as a subcontractor in larger construction projects - like a new commercial site or residential subdivision. They can work on smaller projects directly with a home owner, usually specializing in renovations or remodels.

In business insurance speak, often called 'artisan contractors' or 'casual contractors', they are involved in many aspects of construction and contracting work – and include various trades and skills. Carpenters, painters, plumbers, electricians, roofers, tree trimmers, landscaping are just a few examples. They may do roofing, fencing, drywall, tile work and many other trades that involve skilled work with tools at the customer's premises.

An artisan contractor performs a single trade or job, and each has its own specialized liability needs with its own exposures to risk and accidents. Contractors liability insurance can offer coverage for bodily injury, property damage, advertising injury and medical payments.

Most artisan contractors should have commercial general liability at the very least, but many need broader coverages - like an umbrella to increase their limits of liability, inland marine policy to protect their tools, workers compensation if they have employees, and even commercial auto if they use vehicles for business purposes.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Contractors' Equipment and Tools, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivable, Builders Risk, Computers, Goods in Transit, Installation Floater, Valuable Papers and Records, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practicesand Stop Gap Liability.


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