Building Cleaning And Maintenance Services Insurance

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Building Cleaning And Maintenance Services Insurance Policy Information

Building Cleaning And Maintenance Services Insurance

Building Cleaning And Maintenance Services Insurance. Building cleaning services clean the interior of premises for commercial clients, especially offices and retail shops. Some provide exclusive services to one client only, while others have a number of regular clients or offer services to the public on an "as needed" basis. Typical services include the removal of trash from all areas of the premises, cleaning restrooms, dusting, and regular vacuuming, mopping or sweeping of floors. Other services may include cleaning carpets, draperies, or eating areas, polishing floors, and window washing. Some provide cleaning services for properties up for sale or after criminal activity.

As a building cleaning and maintenance service company, you work with a variety of clients. From corporate offices to academic institutions, it's likely that clean and maintain several types of businesses. You also face a number of different risks, some of which are risks that businesses in all industries face; employees could sustain work-related injuries or your equipment could be stolen from a jobs site. Some of the risks that you face are unique to your specific line of work.

For example, if you're tasked with cleaning and maintaining delicate and expensive diagnostic imaging machinery, an employee could potentially break it; or, if you're polishing the hardwood flooring of a historic building, the solution you're using could damage it. These are just some of the incidents that could arise, and any of them could result in serious financial implications. This is why you should have building cleaning and maintenance services insurance to protect your business.

building cleaning and maintenance services insurance protects your janitorial company from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

How Much Does Building Cleaning And Maintenance Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small building cleaning and maintenance businesses ranges from $47 to $59 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

Do You Need Building Cleaning And Maintenance Services Insurance?

Of course, providing proper training and ensuring that you and your employees are following all protocols can help you avoid certain situations. However, regardless of how well-trained your staff is and how much you adhere to protocols, accidents do happen and emergencies can arise. When they do, you can be held liable. The cost associated with repairing or replacing damaged property and medical bills can be exorbitant. If a client or an employee ends up filing a lawsuit, you'll also have to deal with legal expenses. The bottom line: if something goes awry, you could be responsible for some hefty fees, the cost of which could potentially put you in financial ruin.

What's the best way to protect your business, your clients, your employees - and yourself - from liabilities and the associated financial responsibilities? Insurance. With the right type of building cleaning and maintenance services insurance coverage, you won't have to cover the cost of damages and litigation out of your own pocket. Instead, your insurance carrier will handle these expenses for you. In other words, having insurance can save you from serious financial turmoil.

What Types Of Insurance Coverage Should Building Cleaning Services Carry?

Since there are so many risks associated with operating a Building Cleaning and Maintenance Services company, there are several types of coverage that you should carry. Some types of insurance coverage are compulsory, while others are elective:

  • Commercial General Liability - This type of coverage is mandatory and protects you from third-party claims; for example, if a vendor slips and falls while making a delivery, commercial general liability insurance will cover the cost of any associated medical care. If the client files a lawsuit, it will also cover the cost of litigation.
  • Workers' Compensation - Whether you employee a staff of 1 or 500, workers comp coverage is legally required in most states. Should an employee slip and fall while waxing a floor and suffers a compound fracture, it will cover any medical bills, as well as lost wages.
  • Commercial property insurance - Another mandated form of coverage, commercial property insurance protects the physical property of your business, as well as anything within it; machinery, supplies, office equipment, etc. If the building and contents are damaged in a fire or vandalized, for example, commercial property insurance will assist with the cost of repairing or replacing anything that's damaged or lost.
  • Inland Marine - Commercial property insurance only protects those items that are housed within the physical structure of your business' property. That means that any machinery - floor buffers, for example - that aren't on your property won't be covered by your policy when they're in transit or on a job site. For that, you'll need inland marine insurance. If that buffer is stolen, vandalized, or damaged because a fire breaks out in the building you're cleaning, this type of policy will cover the cost of repairing or replacing it.
  • Commercial Auto - If you use any vehicles for work-related reasons, you'll also want to carry commercial auto insurance. If the driver of the vehicle is involved in an accident, commercial auto will go into effect.

Building Cleaning & Maintenance Services Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures are slight at the building cleaner's premises due to lack of public access to the premises, but moderate away from the premises due to hazards at the job site. When cleaning building interiors, there is some potential for slip and fall injuries to the client's employees or customers due to wet, slippery floors, spills and equipment and supplies impeding access.

The absence of basic controls (e.g., scheduling to minimize any work done while the premises are open for business, proper caution signs, the use of non-slip finishes, etc.) may indicate a morale hazard. There is also the risk of injury or damage to customers' property from spills, marring, scratched surfaces, and the upset or dropping of breakables. Many of these fall under the care, custody and control exclusion, and should be covered under inland marine bailees' forms. All agreements regarding responsibility for the property in the insured's care need careful review and evaluation.

Cleaning services typically employ casual labor and have high turnover, with minimal time or budget for training, which can increase the loss potential. Pre employment background checks and reference checks should be a part of the hiring process in order to protect clients. A major concern is failure to secure the premises during cleaning and especially upon completion of the work. This hazard increases with high employee turnover.

The cleaning service should have specific procedures addressing lockup and key control that include a final checklist by the supervisor of a particular client when the job is completed. Some areas of the customers' premises may need to remain closed because they contain property susceptible to damage or contamination, dangerous materials, or confidential information.

Personal injury exposures include invasion of privacy and even assault to the customers' employees. Failure to run background checks and review references on employees increases the hazard and reduces available defenses.

Workers compensation exposure can be high. Casual labor, high turnover and minimal training time are all factors affecting losses. Work is frequently performed under time constraints, which can encourage workers to cut corners. Lung, eye, or skin irritations and reactions can result from cleaning chemicals. Slips and falls can occur during cleaning operations. Back injuries, hernias, sprains and strains can result from lifting.

Employees can be assaulted while working "off hours" in empty buildings. Close supervision is needed. Workers may be injured in auto accidents during transportation to and from job sites.

Property exposures at the cleaner's premises are usually limited to an office and storage of equipment, supplies, and vehicles. Cleaning supplies may contain flammable chemicals that require proper labeling, separation, and storage in approved containers and cabinets to reduce the potential for fire. There may be a garage area for vehicles transporting equipment and crew to job sites.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty, including theft of customers' goods. Background checks, including criminal history, should be performed on all employees handling money. All ordering, billing and disbursement should be handled as separate duties with reconciliations occurring regularly. Supervision and monitoring are important to control losses.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable if the building cleaner offers credit to customers, contractors' equipment for cleaning supplies and equipment, such as vacuum cleaners, taken to the customer's premises, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. Some cleaners may store some of their equipment on the customer's premises; others do their work with equipment provided by the client.

There may be a bailees' exposure for customers' property in the cleaner's care, custody and control. Damage to high-valued items like carpeting and draperies could result in a sizable loss since a small spill or other damage could result in the entire item being unusable.

Business auto exposures are generally limited to driving to and from clients' premises with crew, equipment, and supplies. All drivers must be well trained and have valid licenses for the type of vehicle being driven. MVRs must be run on a regular basis. Random drug and alcohol testing should be conducted. Vehicles must be well maintained with records kept in a central location.

If employees provide their own transportation to worksites, the exposure is limited to non-owned for workers running work-related errands. If workers transport coworkers in personal autos, the cleaning service should verify that personal automobile insurance has been purchased.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 7349 Building Cleaning and Maintenance Services, NEC
  • NAICS CODE: 561720 Janitorial Services
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 96816
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 9014, 9015

Building Cleaning And Maintenance Services - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the different types of janitorial policies you should invest in and how much coverage you should carry, speak to a reputable insurance broker.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Additional Resources For Contractors & Home Improvement Insurance

Learn about small business contractor's insurance, including what it covers, how much it costs - and how commercial insurance can help protect your contracting business from lawsuits.


Contractors And Home Improvement Insurance

A contractor that wants to begin or stay in business, liability coverage must be obtained for the premises or operations, off-site locations and products/completed operations exposures. These coverages may be included as a part of a businessowners policy (BOP) or purchased in a commercial general liability (CGL) policy. Owners and contractors protective liability and railroad protective liability coverages may also be required in certain cases in order for a contractor to obtain a particular job.

Physical damage coverage for tools, supplies and equipment, both on and off the contractor's premises, is a concern. Liability exposures at the premises of the contractor, and at the premises of the contractor's customer, must be properly addressed along with completed operations. Business insurance is very important as is workers compensation insurance protection for employees.

Contractors may work under a general contractor as a subcontractor in larger construction projects - like a new commercial site or residential subdivision. They can work on smaller projects directly with a home owner, usually specializing in renovations or remodels.

In business insurance speak, often called 'artisan contractors' or 'casual contractors', they are involved in many aspects of construction and contracting work – and include various trades and skills. Carpenters, painters, plumbers, electricians, roofers, tree trimmers, landscaping are just a few examples. They may do roofing, fencing, drywall, tile work and many other trades that involve skilled work with tools at the customer's premises.

An artisan contractor performs a single trade or job, and each has its own specialized liability needs with its own exposures to risk and accidents. Contractors liability insurance can offer coverage for bodily injury, property damage, advertising injury and medical payments.

Most artisan contractors should have commercial general liability at the very least, but many need broader coverages - like an umbrella to increase their limits of liability, inland marine policy to protect their tools, workers compensation if they have employees, and even commercial auto if they use vehicles for business purposes.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Contractors' Equipment and Tools, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivable, Builders Risk, Computers, Goods in Transit, Installation Floater, Valuable Papers and Records, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practicesand Stop Gap Liability.


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