Sandblasting Contractors Insurance

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Sandblasting Contractors Insurance Policy Information

Sandblasting Contractors Insurance

Sandblasting Contractors Insurance. Are you thinking about getting into the business of sandblasting contracting? If so, there are a lot of things that you need to take into consideration and attend to before you get your business up and running:

Where the headquarters of your business will be located, what type of equipment you will use, the specific services you provide, the clientele you are going to work with, and the number of employees that you are going to hire are just some of the things that you need to think about. However, there's something else that's just as important as all of these things; insurance.

sandblasting contractors clean buildings, structures, or other objects by shooting a pressurized mixture of abrasive materials, including sand, against the surface of the object. Sandblasting may be used to polish a surface, but most often is used to remove paint including graffiti, finishes, or corrosion from brick or metal surfaces. Typically, sandblasting is done off premises at job sites.

Every business owner, no matter the industry, needs to carry the right type of coverage. But why is insurance so important for sandblasting contractors and why type of sandblasting contractors insurance coverage do you need? Keep on reading to find out.

sandblasting contractors insurance protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $67/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

How Much Does Sandblasting Contractors Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small sandblasting contractors ranges from $67 to $89 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

Why Do Sandblasting Contractors Need Business Insurance Coverage?

As a sandblasting contractor, your job is to clean various types of surfaces using heavy machinery that propels abrasive agents. You need to have pinpoint precision to do an effective job, and you need to work in a relatively fast manner in order to get it done on-time. You also have to ensure that all of the techniques that are being used are safe and won't damage individuals or property. In other words, you have a lot of responsibility on your shoulders.

Even though you make every effort to do the best job possible and avoid mishaps, issues can arise. You could accidentally spray the wrong type of abrasive material onto a surface and damage it; an employee could be injured while he's working; someone could sue you, alleging that you didn't do the work you said you would.

Whatever the case may be, you could be looking at very hefty costs if something unexpected occurs. Those costs could be crippling and could damage your entire business if you have to pay for them out of your own pocket. That's why it's so important to invest in the right type of sandblasting contractors insurance. When the unthinkable happens, your insurance provider will help to cover the expenses so that you aren't left footing the bill.

What Type Of Insurance Should Sandblasting Contractors Have?

The specific type(s) of coverage you will need depend on the unique details of your business; where in you are located, the size of your sandblasting contracting business; how many employees you have; what type of machinery that you use; the services you provide, etc.

Therefore, to find out exactly what type of coverage you need, it's in your best interest to speak to a reputable agent so that you can make sure your business is well-protected. With that said, however, there are certain types of sandblasting contractors insurance that all contractors will need to carry, no matter what the specific details of their business may be:

  • Workers Compensation - Even if you employ a staff of just a handful of people, you're going to need to carry workers' compensation insurance. Should an employee become injured while performing a service, this type of coverage will help to pay for the cost of his or her medical care; it will also assist with paying for any wages that he or she may miss while recovering.
  • Commercial General Liability - You will also need to invest in commercial general liability insurance. This type of coverage protects you from any third-party bodily injury or property damage claims. For example, if you damaged a client's property - even if it was accidental - this type of insurance will pay for the repairs, as well as any legal fees that may arise if a lawsuit is filed against you.
  • Commercial Equipment - The equipment you use to perform your sandblasting services isn't cheap, so you want to make sure that it is properly protected. With commercial equipment insurance, if your gear is stolen or damaged, whether it's on a job site, in a vehicle, or on the premises of your business, the cost of repairing or replacing the equipment will be covered by your carrier.
  • Commercial Auto - You should also invest in commercial auto insurance, as this policy will cover your commercial vehicles if an accident occurs, which your personal auto policy will not.

These are just some of the forms of Sandblasting Contractors insurance coverage that should be considered. The specific type of coverage will vary from organization to organization and depends on a variety of factors; the size of the club and the nature of the activities that occur at the organization, for example.

Sandblasting Contractor's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is limited at the contractor's premises due to lack of public access. Equipment stored in an open yard may present an attractive nuisance to children and other trespassers. At job sites, exterior sandblasting can be a hazard to passersby, parked vehicles and nearby structures.

The area of operation should be restricted by barriers and proper signage for protection against falling objects, slips and falls. The interaction of sand or other blasting material and the surface it strikes can generate heat and perhaps cause chemical change resulting in fire or explosion. Paint and other material that is blasted off during the operation may contain toxic chemicals.

The silica (sand) contained in the overspray is abrasive to property, and can be severely hazardous if inhaled. The blasting operations are also loud, generating a nuisance hazard. Equipment and scaffolding left unattended at the jobsite are an attractive nuisance, so access by children must be prevented.

Completed operations liability exposures may result from hidden damage to the integrity of the surfaces the insured works on, such as the removal of more surface material than intended. Sand and other blasting materials may enter cracks and weaken the structure. In the case of metals, sandblasting may cause "fatigue" due to the weakening of rigidity. Claims may arise from failure to use the correct grade of sand or other medium, or blasting at the wrong angle or pressure.

Environmental impairment liability exposures may arise from the waste generated in the sandblasting process. Any job will entail stripping away of grime and other debris from the objects cleaned. Allowing waste to accumulate either at the job site or in the contractor's yard could cause a severe environmental impairment situation. The insured must use safe methods to collect, transport, and dispose of the waste.

Workers compensation exposures can be very high. The force of the overspray from sandblasting can result in abrasions and eye injuries. Dust can be silica-based, which can cause incurable lung injury or disease. The particles given off by certain metals can be toxic and cause serious injury. Cumulative exposure to high-decibel operations may result in permanent hearing impairment.

When work is done on ladders, cherry pickers and scaffolds, there is a potential for severe injury or death from falling, being struck by falling objects, or adverse weather conditions. The absence of good maintenance of scaffolds, proper use of basic safety equipment, such as properly installed guards, safety belts, steel-toed shoes, as well as hearing and eye protection, and strict enforcement of safety practices may indicate a morale hazard.

Back injuries, hernias, sprains and strains can occur from lifting and from setting up scaffolding and machinery, and from placing objects to be cleaned or polished into the blasting cabinets at the yard site. Workers may be injured in auto accidents during transportation to and from job sites.

Property exposures at the contractor's premises are generally limited to an office and storage of equipment, supplies and vehicles. If sandblasting is done on premises, fire or explosion potential exists from sparks or high temperatures created by the process. Adequate dust control and cooling are needed. There may be a garage area for vehicles transporting equipment and crew to job sites. Property stored outside may be a target for vandalism.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty, including theft of customers' goods. Background checks, including criminal history, should be obtained on each employee prior to hiring. Ordering, billing, and disbursement should be handled as separate duties with reconciliations occurring regularly. There should be appropriate procedures in place when employees accept payments off site.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the contractor offers credit to customers, contractors' equipment for supplies and equipment taken to customers' premises, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. Equipment may be subject to loss from theft, collision, overturn, and abrasive damage from overspray during operations. Scaffolding left on the jobsite overnight may be vandalized or stolen.

Business auto exposure generally includes driving to and from clients' premises with crew, equipment and supplies. Specialized vehicles, such as cherry pickers, or hauling large scaffolding may necessitate oversized or unsteady loads, with a high potential for collision or overturn. All drivers must be well trained and have valid licenses for the type of vehicle being driven. MVRs must be run on a regular basis. Random drug and alcohol testing should be conducted. Vehicles must be well maintained with records kept in a central location.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 1799 Special Trade Contractors NEC
  • NAICS CODE: 238990 All Other Specialty Trade Contractors
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 98705
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 5213

Sandblasting Contractor Insurance

The sandblasting contracting industry can be quite lucrative; however, there are certain risks that are associated with operating a business in this industry. To protect yourself from these perils, it is absolutely essential for you to invest in the right type of sandblasting contractors insurance coverage; furthermore, you need to make sure that you are carrying enough coverage.

You can find out exactly what type of coverage - and how much - you need by speaking to an experienced insurance broker. One of the best things you can do for your business is protect it with the right insurance.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Commercial insurance steps in to help you manage these risks, avoiding a situation which requires you to pay exorbitant costs out-of-pocket.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Additional Resources For Contractors & Home Improvement Insurance

Learn about small business contractor's insurance, including what it covers, how much it costs - and how commercial insurance can help protect your contracting business from lawsuits.


Contractors And Home Improvement Insurance

A contractor that wants to begin or stay in business, liability coverage must be obtained for the premises or operations, off-site locations and products/completed operations exposures. These coverages may be included as a part of a businessowners policy (BOP) or purchased in a commercial general liability (CGL) policy. Owners and contractors protective liability and railroad protective liability coverages may also be required in certain cases in order for a contractor to obtain a particular job.

Physical damage coverage for tools, supplies and equipment, both on and off the contractor's premises, is a concern. Liability exposures at the premises of the contractor, and at the premises of the contractor's customer, must be properly addressed along with completed operations. Business insurance is very important as is workers compensation insurance protection for employees.

Contractors may work under a general contractor as a subcontractor in larger construction projects - like a new commercial site or residential subdivision. They can work on smaller projects directly with a home owner, usually specializing in renovations or remodels.

In business insurance speak, often called 'artisan contractors' or 'casual contractors', they are involved in many aspects of construction and contracting work – and include various trades and skills. Carpenters, painters, plumbers, electricians, roofers, tree trimmers, landscaping are just a few examples. They may do roofing, fencing, drywall, tile work and many other trades that involve skilled work with tools at the customer's premises.

An artisan contractor performs a single trade or job, and each has its own specialized liability needs with its own exposures to risk and accidents. Contractors liability insurance can offer coverage for bodily injury, property damage, advertising injury and medical payments.

Most artisan contractors should have commercial general liability at the very least, but many need broader coverages - like an umbrella to increase their limits of liability, inland marine policy to protect their tools, workers compensation if they have employees, and even commercial auto if they use vehicles for business purposes.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Contractors' Equipment and Tools, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivable, Builders Risk, Computers, Goods in Transit, Installation Floater, Valuable Papers and Records, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practicesand Stop Gap Liability.


Sandblasting Contractors Insurance
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