Taxidermy Insurance

Get Your Quote

Or call for your free quote:

Get the best small business insurance quotes online & info on cost, coverage, minimum requirements, certificates & more.

Taxidermy Insurance Policy Information

Taxidermy Insurance

Taxidermy Insurance. Taxidermists preserve animals, birds, and fish for display in homes, offices, museums, restaurants, and other retail establishments. The carcasses of the animals, birds, fish, and reptiles are received from customers. Unwanted biological materials are removed and discarded. The hide may be frozen for later use. To prepare, the hide is measured, treated with chemicals to prevent decomposition, fitted onto forms, and mounted on a board or other display piece.

The taxidermist completes the job by adding glass eyes, painting, and retouching the hide to provide a natural appearance. Occasionally artificial beaks, teeth or tongue are added. Some taxidermists also offer tanning and hide preparation services.

Whether you do taxidermy at home as a hobby or you make your full-time living from it, there are definitely some rewards that come from the process. But there are also things to worry about - especially if you are doing taxidermy as a full-time business. One of those things is insurance. Every business needs commercial insurance, and usually you need several types of insurance to make sure that your business is fully protected. But what about specialized occupations like taxidermy? How do you make sure that you are covered in all of the standard areas as well as the specialized areas that require taxidermy insurance?

Taxidermy insurance protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

How Much Does Taxidermy Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small taxidermy businesses ranges from $47 to $59 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

What Types Of Taxidermy Insurance Are Available?

General Liability For Taxidermists

General liability insurance is a type of taxidermy insurance that is very common among businesses. Commercial general liability was created by insurance companies to sort of offer blanket coverage over many of the issues that business owners faced. Since they had so many of these things in common, it was determined that you could offer it under one package called business liability insurance in most of it would apply to just about any business owner out there.

General liability covers things like completed operations, product liabilities, things that happen on your premises and lots more. It can be customized for taxidermists as well. One example of liability insurance might be that someone visiting your taxidermy shop gets injured by one of your tools or even gets cut on one of your completed taxidermy projects.

Taxidermist's Professional Liability

You may want to consider some kind of extra insurance when you're working in taxidermy. The reason for that is that you will often be working with people's pets. This means that you only get one shot to get it right. If you mess up somehow and are not able to taxidermy their pet successfully, then there is no way that they can replace that.

Many taxidermists choose to get errors and omissions insurance if they're going to be working with people's pets so that they are covered in the event that they make a mistake and are not able to taxidermy someone's beloved pet properly or have made a mistake where something happens to it later on and it gets destroyed.

Commercial Property Insurance For Taxidermists

Property insurance is also pretty important for taxidermists. That's because your entire inventory is going to be located on your premises. Property insurance usually protects you from natural disasters and fires, floods in vandalism and other things that happen to your property. Each property insurance plan is a little bit different, but they all generally include protection from the major natural disasters out there and from fire, severe wind damage and vandalism.

This is important, especially if you have a retail location where you have set up shop and built a business that people know. If some kind of mishap wipes out your business, then you are either going to have to spend a great deal of out-of-pocket money to restore your business or have insurance that will pay for it.

Other Important Insurance Types

There might be other types of insurance that you need depending upon your operations:

Workers Compensation - For example, if it is just you that works at your taxidermy shop, then you don't have to worry about any of the concerns for insurance that businesses with employees have to worry about. But if you have even one employee that gets paid hourly or receives a salary, then you're going to have to offer workers compensation insurance. Workers comp pays for employees medical bills who are injured on the job and may even help them recover lost wages.

Business Auto - You might also have to get commercial automobile insurance. This will depend upon whether you have vehicles that you use specifically in your taxidermy business. Or whether you use your own vehicle enough in your business to have it qualify for any sort of tax write-offs. If that's the case, then you might have to get commercial automobile insurance. This is usually based on a policy of your insurance company, but it is nice to have because it covers your vehicles completely even if the other driver had no insurance on their vehicle.

Taxidermist's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is usually limited because there is little visitor access. If customers and visitors are allowed on the premises, floor coverings must be in good condition. Parking lots and sidewalks must be well maintained and kept free of ice and snow.

Products liability exposures come from damage done to the item being prepared, lack of accurate records verifying ownership, and disappointment when an item does not look the way the customer had hoped. The taxidermist should process the hides in a way that does not attract bugs or other vermin to the finished piece.

Environmental impairment exposure is high due to the potential for air, surface, or ground water, or soil contamination due to the disposal of waste chemicals, scrap, and hair. Disposal of wastes must adhere to all federal and state guidelines.

Workers compensation exposures can be high due to the handling of carcasses. Cuts while removing the skins and hides are common, as are puncture wounds, slips and falls on slick floors, back, and lifting injuries such as hernias, sprains, and strains. Bloodborne pathogens may pass disease from carcasses to workers. Inhalation of dander and feathers may induce allergic reactions. The use of chemicals can result in serious eye, skin, and lung injuries.

Some chemicals, particularly formaldehyde and arsenic, are toxic. Employees must be fully informed as to the potential effects of any chemicals, including long-term occupational disease hazards so that they can take action as quickly as possible. Grinding of fiberglass molds and forms can present an occupational disease exposure. Workers should be provided with personal safety protection such as gloves and masks.

Property exposures consist of a small office and processing area. Ignition sources include electrical equipment, heating, and air conditioning. Chemicals and flammables used in the preservation and hide preparation operations must be properly labeled, separated, and stored. Fire loads can be high as feathers, skins, and stuffing materials are combustible. There should be adequate ventilation to prevent the buildup of dust and chemical vapors which can ignite.

Poor housekeeping can be a serious fire hazard. Vandalism is a concern because of animal rights activists. Hides and skins can present a high exposure to theft, particularly if the taxidermist specializes in rare or exotic animals. Controls should be in place to prevent access to the premises after hours. Hides are often kept in freezers until the taxidermist has time for processing. Power outages could result in a spoilage and loss of income loss.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty. Background checks should be conducted on all employees handling money. Billing, ordering, and disbursements must be kept as separate duties and audited annually.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable if the taxidermist offers credit, bailees customers, computers, and valuable papers and records for clients' and suppliers' information. The bailees customers exposure is high since the customers provide the carcasses to be preserved. These must be returned to the customer in good condition. All items must be clearly identified to be sure they are returned to their rightful owner. There must be a procedure in place for disposing of unclaimed items.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to the pickup of items to be processed and delivery of completed items. Drivers must be licensed with acceptable MVRs. All vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept in a central location.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 7299, 7389 Repair Shops and Related Services, not elsewhere classified
  • NAICS CODE: 711510 Independent Artists, Writers and Performers
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 49005
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 9600

Taxidermy - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the different types of taxidermy insurance policies you should consider, and how much coverage you should have, speak to a professional insurance broker.

Small Business Economic Data & Insurance Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. Maybe you want to contribute to the economic growth of your community. Whatever the reason is, if you're thinking about starting a small business, it's important to understand pertinent information relating to small businesses in the United States; namely economic information and insurance regulations. After all, if you want your small business to succeed, you have to understand the economic trends organizations of a similar size in your area.

Likewise, you want to ensure that your small business is well protected with the right business insurance and that you are in compliance with the rules and regulations that pertain to commercial insurance in your region.

Small Business Information

Read up on economic statistics and insurance information that relates to small business owners in the United States.

Small Business Economic Data In The United States

Here's a look at some information that was compiled by the Small Business Association (SBA) regarding the economic data that pertains to small businesses in the United States:

  • In 2015, small businesses in the United States employed an estimated 58.9 million American workers, or 47.5 percent of the nation's private workforce.
  • Largest shares = fewer than 100 employees. The small businesses that employed 100 people or less had the largest share of employment amount small businesses.
  • Employment increased by nearly 2 percent. In 2018, employment amongst small businesses increased by 1.8 percent, which is an increase of 1 percent from the prior year.
  • Increase in proprietors. In 2016, the number of small business proprietors increased by 2.3 percent.
  • In 2015, small businesses were responsible for creating 1.9 million net jobs. Organizations that employed 20 people or less had the largest gains, as they added an estimated 1.1 million net jobs.
  • There were 5.7 million loans that were value less than $100,000 issued by lenders in the United States in 2016. These loans were issued under the Community Reinvestment Act.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the incorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $50,347 in 2016.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the unincorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $23,060 in 2016.
Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage. The SBA recommends the following insurance plans for small business owners:

  • Commercial Property Insurance: In the case of an unplanned disaster - fire, flood, vandalism, theft, etc. - this type of coverage will help you avoid paying for the damage out of your own pocket. Even if you rent the property, you should still carry commercial property insurance.
  • Commercial Liability Insurance: In the event that a legal situation arises - a negligence lawsuit, for example - commercial liability coverage will provide financial protection. It will cover the cost of legal defense fees, court fees, and even moneys that may be awarded.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: If you operate a vehicle for any activities that are related to your business - transporting and/or delivering goods, or meeting with clients - commercial auto insurance is legally required for businesses of all sizes, including small businesses.

Additional Resources For Miscellaneous Insurance

Find informative articles on miscellaneous businesses including the types of commercial insurance they need, costs and other considerations.


Miscellaneous Business Insurance

An insurance contract is an agreement where one party obligates itself to make good the financial loss or damage sustained by a second party when a designated event occurs. The event must be fortuitous and happen by accident. The named insured must have insurable interest at the time of loss. One final point is that in order for any contract to be considered insurance, there must be a risk of loss.

Fortuitous Event - An occurrence largely beyond the control of any involved party; happening by chance; accidental; for example: fire, lightning, windstorm, explosion or flood.

Insurable Interest - In order to recover from a loss to property, the holder must have an insurable interest in the property at the time of the event or occurrence. An insurable interest is any right, title or interest in property where the holder of that right, title or interest sustains financial loss if the property is damaged or destroyed. Any lawful and substantial economic interest in the safety or preservation of the property from loss, destruction or damage also constitutes an insurable interest.

An entity does not have to be the property owner to have an insurable interest in it. Examples include, but are not limited to, mortgagees, trustees, vendors, lessees and bailees. Insurable interest for any entity must exist at the time the loss occurs.

Risk Of Loss - If property could never be destroyed, there is no risk of loss. If property must necessarily disintegrate or be destroyed, there is no risk of loss. Between these two extremes is the exposure of risk that can be insured.


Taxidermy Insurance
Rated 4.8/5 based on 115 reviews
Free Business Insurance Quote Click Here