Enameling Insurance

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Enameling Insurance Policy Information

Enameling Insurance

Enameling Insurance. Enameling is an ages-old art that involves fusing powdered glass to metal at very high temperatures to create various decorative items, such as vases and jewelry. The process is complex and requires a great deal of patience and expertise.

Enameling is the coating of metal products with vitrified or porcelain enamel. The enamel protects the metal against rust or corrosion, scratches or abrasions and produces an attractive or more desirable finish. The metals to be treated are first degreased or otherwise cleaned.

The enamel coating can be applied by spraying, dipping, or electrical charge. The coated metal is then heated in an oven or furnace to harden and dry. Additional coatings are applied as needed.

If you are an enameller, there's no doubt that you have put a lot of hard work into your business. Setting up a studio, honing your craft, marketing, and making sure that you provide high-quality products that meet the needs of your clients, and so much more; you've put a lot into your business.

In order to protect yourself, your clients, and all other aspects of your venture, you need to take all of the necessary precautions. Of all of the investments that you can make in your business, there's one that tops the list: enameling insurance.

Why is insurance so important for your enamellers? What type of coverage do you need? Read on to find the answers to these questions and to discover how to set yourself up for success.

Enameling insurance protects enamellers from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked tobacco farming insurance questions:


How Much Does Enameling Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small enamellers ranges from $37 to $59 per month based on location, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do Enameling Businesses Need Insurance?

Enameled Tile

Just like any other business owner, enameling professionals face several different types of risks; some of those risks are similar to the risks that businesses in any industry face, and some are unique to your specific profession.

For instance, your workshop could be damaged by an act of nature, a client could file a lawsuit against you, an employee could sustain an injury, or your operation could be shut down for a prolonged period of time. In the event that anything does go wrong, as the owner and operator of your enameling business, you are liable for the related expenses.

As you can imagine, the costs that are linked to accidents, errors, and any other unforeseen circumstances can be exorbitant. That's why it's so important to have enameling insurance coverage; in the event that something does go wrong, instead of having to pay for the expenses out of your own pocket, your insurer will cover them for you. In other words, insurance coverage protects you from potential financial ruin.

In addition to the monetary protections that enameling insurance provides, having coverage ensures that you are business is compliant with the laws. In most areas, business owners of most types are required to carry certain types of coverage - including enameling professionals.


What Type Of Insurance Do Enamellers Need?

There are many different types of insurance coverage that enamellers will need; however, it should be noted that the specific policies do vary and depend on several factors that relate to the unique needs of your venture.

The physical location of your business, the size of your operation, and the specific services you provide are just a few examples of the factors that will determine what type of enameling insurance you'll need. For that reason, it's important to consult with a reputable agent who specializes in commercial insurance.

With that said, here's a look at some basic types of coverage that you should in carry.

  • Commercial Property: In the event that your enameling business is impacted by an act of nature, theft, or vandalism, you'll need to have commercial property insurance. This type of coverage is designed to protect the physical structure of your business, as well as the contents within it. For instance, if a fire breaks out in your studio, this policy will cover the cost of any damages and will help to replace anything that can't be repaired.
  • Commercial General Liability: This type of coverage covers the cost of third-party property damage and personal injury liability claims. For instance, if a vendor were to slip and fall while dropping off a delivery on your commercial property and they filed a lawsuit against you, this type of coverage would cover the related expenses.
  • Workers Compensation: This coverage will help to pay for the medical care that an employee may require if they were to suffer a work-related injury. It would also compensate them for lost wages if they were unable to work as a result of their injury.

These policies are just a few examples of the kinds of enameling insurance you'll need to carry as an enameller.


Enamellers' Risks & Exposures

Enameled Pot

Premises liability exposure may be limited if there is no outside yard for storage of raw materials or finished items. Larger items stored in the yard could present attractive nuisance hazards.

Fencing must be in place with appropriate warning signs to prevent trespassing, with security guards provided as necessary. Kilns may catch fire and spread fumes and debris to neighboring buildings.

Products liability exposure can be significant depending on the final use of the product being enameled. Since enameling provides protection from rust and corrosion, product failure due to rust could have serious consequences.

Quality control procedures should be documented. If products are enameled only for the sake of appearance, the product liability is very limited.

Environmental impairment exposure is high because of the fuel used to heat the kilns and the use of solvents and toxic chemicals to clean metal. Storage and waste disposal must comply with all Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements.

Silica is used and may cause air pollution if released. Chemical leaks and wastewater may contaminate air, ground water or land. Any underground storage will require the purchase of a UST policy.

Workers compensation exposure is high. Employees are routinely exposed to chemicals during processing and to machinery hazards which can cause respiratory problems and irritate skin, lungs, and eyes. Silica may be used, which can result in occupational disease.

Back injuries from lifting and slips and falls are common. The heat generated is very high and can cause exhaustion and burns. Personal protective equipment is required.

Property exposure includes an office, processing area, and storage of raw materials and finished goods. Ignition sources include furnaces kept at temperatures well over 1,000 degrees. Flammables include fuel for the furnaces, degreasers, solvents, pigments, or additives to the coatings. Each of these has different degrees of flammability and should be well separated from the furnace area.

The raw materials do not add to the fire load, because neither the metal nor the enamel is flammable. The final products are not highly susceptibly to damage due to the coating. Machinery should be well maintained to prevent problems due to overheating or power surges.

Lost business income in the event of a direct damage loss could be lengthy as replacement facilities may not be readily available.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty. Background checks should be conducted prior to hiring any employee. Ordering and inventory control should be under separate supervisors to discourage theft.

All ordering, billing and disbursements must be handled as separate job duties and regularly audited. Physical inventories should be conducted on a regular basis to prevent employee theft of equipment and stock.

Inland marine exposure comes from accounts receivable, bailees' for customers' items being processed, computers, and valuable papers and records. Normally the enameller is handling property of others which must be recorded, tracked and returned in at least as good a condition as they came.

There may be a transportation exposure, with the enameller responsible for any damage that may occur to customers' goods being transported.

Business auto exposure is moderate to high if the processor performs pickup or delivery of products. Since enameling consists of so many different products of varying sizes and shapes, the evaluation of the exposure must be dependent on the final product handled

Larger items may be awkward and difficult to load and tie-down. Very heavy items may shift during transport, resulting in overturn or collision. Proper tie down procedure are critical.

Drivers should have commercial driver's licenses (CDL's) and their MVRs should be checked regularly. Vehicles and any tie-down equipment must be well maintained and documented.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 3479 Coating, Engraving, and Allied Services, Not Elsewhere Classified
  • NAICS CODE: 332812 Metal Coating, Engraving (except Jewelry and Silverware), and Allied Services to Manufacturers, 332813 Electroplating, Plating, Polishing, Anodizing and Coloring
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 56913
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 3224

Description for 3479: Coating, Engraving, and Allied Services, Not Elsewhere Classified

Division D: Manufacturing | Major Group 34: Fabricated Metal Products, Except Machinery And Transportation Equipment | Industry Group 347: Coating, Engraving, And Allied Services

3479 Coating, Engraving, and Allied Services, Not Elsewhere Classified: Establishments primarily engaged in performing the following types of services on metals, for the trade: (1) enameling, lacquering, and varnishing metal products; (2) hot dip galvanizing of mill sheets, plates and bars, castings, and formed products fabricated of iron and steel; hot dip coating such items with aluminum, lead, or zinc; retinning cans and utensils; (3) engraving, chasing and etching jewelry, silverware, notarial and other seals, and other metal products for purposes other than printing; and (4) other metal services, not elsewhere classified. Also included in this industry are establishments which perform these types of activities on their own account on purchased metals or formed products. Establishments that both manufacture and finish products are classified according to the products.

  • Bonderizing of metal and metal products, for the trade
  • Chasing on metals for the trade, for purposes other than printing
  • Coating (hot dipping) of metals and formed products, for the trade
  • Coating and wrapping steel pipe
  • Coating of metals with plastics and resins, for the trade
  • Coating of metals with silicon, for the trade
  • Coating, rust preventive
  • Dipping metal in plastics solution aa a preservative, for the trade
  • Enameling (including porcelain) of metal products, for the trade
  • Engraving jewelry, silverware, and metal for the trade: except
  • Etching on metals for purposes other than printing
  • Etching: photochemical, for the trade
  • Galvanizing of iron and steel and end formed products, for the trade
  • Japanning of metal
  • Jewelry enameling, for the trade
  • Lacquering of metal products, for the trade
  • Name plates: engraved and etched
  • Painting (enameling and varnishing) of metal products, for the trade
  • Pan glazing, for the trade
  • Parkerizing, for the trade
  • Phosphate coating of metal and metal products, for the trade
  • Retinning of cans and utensils, not done in rolling mills
  • Rust proofing (hot dipping) of metals and formed products, for the
  • Sherardizing of metals and metal products, for the trade
  • Varnishing of metals products, for the trade

Enameling Insurance - The Bottom Line

As mentioned, in order to determine exactly what kind of enameling insurance coverage you'll need to fully protect your dealership, speak with a reputable broker who specializes in commercial insurance.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Miscellaneous Insurance

Find informative articles on miscellaneous businesses including the types of commercial insurance they need, costs and other considerations.


Miscellaneous Business Insurance

An insurance contract is an agreement where one party obligates itself to make good the financial loss or damage sustained by a second party when a designated event occurs. The event must be fortuitous and happen by accident. The named insured must have insurable interest at the time of loss. One final point is that in order for any contract to be considered insurance, there must be a risk of loss.

Fortuitous Event - An occurrence largely beyond the control of any involved party; happening by chance; accidental; for example: fire, lightning, windstorm, explosion or flood.

Insurable Interest - In order to recover from a loss to property, the holder must have an insurable interest in the property at the time of the event or occurrence. An insurable interest is any right, title or interest in property where the holder of that right, title or interest sustains financial loss if the property is damaged or destroyed. Any lawful and substantial economic interest in the safety or preservation of the property from loss, destruction or damage also constitutes an insurable interest.

An entity does not have to be the property owner to have an insurable interest in it. Examples include, but are not limited to, mortgagees, trustees, vendors, lessees and bailees. Insurable interest for any entity must exist at the time the loss occurs.

Risk Of Loss - If property could never be destroyed, there is no risk of loss. If property must necessarily disintegrate or be destroyed, there is no risk of loss. Between these two extremes is the exposure of risk that can be insured.


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