Office Buildings Insurance

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Office Buildings Insurance Policy Information

Office Buildings Insurance

Office Buildings Insurance. Are you the owner of an office building? If so, whether you use the building yourself or you lease it to tenants, it's important that you properly protect yourself with the right type of insurance. There are several issues that could affect and office building, and these issues could come with a hefty price tag. Insurance is the best way to protect yourself from financial turmoil should a problem arise that needs to be addressed.

Office buildings lease commercial space to various tenants, including professional service providers, medical providers, and sales offices. The leases can be offered on a short-term basis or extend through a number of years.

What is office buildings insurance? Why do you need it? How much will this type of coverage cost? Below, you'll find the answers to these questions so that you can make sure your office properties are properly protected.

Office buildings insurance protects your commercial properties from lawsuits with rates as low as $99/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

How Much Does Office Buildings Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small office buildings ranges from $99 to $159 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

Why Do Office Buildings Need Insurance?

If you own an office building, it's exceptionally important that you invest in insurance to protect it. The cost to repair the structure or to replace any damaged equipment, machinery, and inventory within the building if a fire, explosion, or any other act of damaging situation arises can be exorbitant. Trying to cover those expenses on your own could end up being financially crippling. It may be so expensive, in fact, that there's a very real possibility that you may have go bankrupt or have to sell the building.

If your office space is covered with commercial property insurance, the financial burden that may be associated with any of the above-mentioned claims will be taken off of your shoulders. Instead having to pay for those expenses yourself, the company that issues your policy will cover the cost for you. In other words, office building insurance can help you avoid financial devastation.

In addition to protecting you financially, office buildings insurance can also protect you legally. Owners of any commercial space are required, by law, to carry property insurance. If you fail to have the right coverage, you could end up facing stiff penalties, and possibly even jail time.

What Is Office Buildings Insurance?

Also known as commercial property insurance, office building insurance is a policy that's designed to protect the physical structure of a building, as well as the contents inside. This type of insurance covers the following elements of an office building:

  • The walls, flooring, roof, windows, doors, and other physical elements of the building
  • Exterior signage and lighting
  • Landscaping, fencing, walkways
  • Furnishings inside the building, such as desks, chairs, and filing cabinets
  • Documents that may be located inside the building
  • Inventory and supplies
  • Equipment and machinery, such as dollies, loaders, printers, and computers
  • Anyone else's property that is housed within the building; employee briefcases, handbags, and clothing, for example

Depending on the specifics of a policy, office building insurance may also cover business interruption. If your office building is damaged in a fire, for example, and operations have to cease during the recovery effort, the policy may replace any wages that are lost while the office space is out of commission. This type of insurance provides protection against a variety of risks, including:

  • Fire
  • Pipe leaks or bursts
  • Storm damage
  • Explosions
  • Vandalism
  • Theft

While office buildings insurance does provide coverage for a variety of risks, there are certain elements that it may not cover. Generally, commercial property insurance doesn't cover damages caused by floods, earthquakes, or volcanoes.

How Much Does Office Buildings Insurance Cost?

There are a variety of factors that will influence the cost of a office building insurance policy. The expense is largely dependent on the value of assets, including the structure itself and the items that it contains. There are other factors that will affect the price of this type of coverage. These factors include:

  • The location of the office building.
  • The type of materials that building is constructed out of.
  • The size of the building; how many people it can hold.
  • Whether or not you have theft and fire prevention elements installed; a fire alarm, sprinkler, and security system, for example.

Office Building's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure can be high due to the number of tenants and visitors to the property. All buildings should meet life safety codes and be in compliance with codes on smoke and fire detection and fire extinguishers.

To prevent slips, trips, and falls, all premises must be well maintained with aisle ways free of debris, flooring in good condition, no frayed or worn spots on carpet, and no cracks or holes in flooring. The number of exits must be sufficient and well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure. Steps should have handrails, be well lighted, marked, and in good repair. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair, with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slip and fall.

Security of tenants and visitors, both inside the building and in parking areas, is rapidly becoming the responsibility of the owner or operator of the premises. There should be a maintenance activity log to document the owner's response to tenants' needs. Personal injury losses may occur due to alleged wrongful eviction, invasion of privacy, or discrimination. Clear guidelines for tenant acceptability are important.

Workers compensation exposure hazards are normally service, janitorial, or maintenance-related. Back pain, hernias, sprains, and strains from lifting and working from awkward positions are common. Skin and lung irritation can result from working with cleaning chemicals and paint. Interaction with tenants or guests can be difficult. Employees should be trained in dealing with difficult situations.

Property exposure is low. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating, and air conditioning systems. Some tenants may have small kitchenettes for use by their employees. The owner should be aware of the electrical demands of tenants to ensure that there is adequate wiring in place to handle it. All wiring should be up to code. Each unit may have a separate heating system, or there may be a boiler to provide heat to all units.

All systems must be properly maintained on an ongoing basis. There should be hard-wired smoke/fire alarms in all units and common areas. If alarms are battery-powered, there must be documented records of periodic maintenance. Upgrades should be handled with appropriate permits. If the building has any unique architecture or design, valuation may be a concern. Business interruption could be a concern should a loss occur and tenants are unable to access the building.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. Rents are generally due on the first of each month. Receipts must be provided for all payments, and reconciliation between receipts and money received. Deposits should be made promptly with appropriate security provided. All orders and disbursements must be handled by separate individuals. Access to units must be limited to those authorized to do so, and access to master keys must be strictly controlled. Units should be rekeyed when there is a change in tenant.

Inland marine exposures are from accounts receivables for rents due, computers, and valuable papers and records for leases, mortgages, and tenants' information. Duplicates of all data must be kept off premises for easy replication in the event of a loss. Contractors' equipment may be needed if maintenance of yard and buildings is handled internally. Some building owners may display fine arts in the common areas.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired & non-onwed for employees running errands. If there are owned vehicles, such as those used for servicing, any driver must have a valid driver's license and acceptable MVR. Routine maintenance on owned vehicles should be documented.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 6512 Nonresidential Building Operators
  • NAICS CODE: 531120 Lessors of Nonresidential Buildings (except Miniwarehouses)
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 61212, 61216, 61217, 61218
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 9012, 9015

Office Buildings Insurance - The Bottom Line

To find out more about office buildings insurance, how much coverage you should carry, and how much this type of policy will cost, consult with a broker that specializes in commercial property insurance.

Small Business Economic Data & Insurance Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. Maybe you want to contribute to the economic growth of your community. Whatever the reason is, if you're thinking about starting a small business, it's important to understand pertinent information relating to small businesses in the United States; namely economic information and insurance regulations. After all, if you want your small business to succeed, you have to understand the economic trends organizations of a similar size in your area.

Likewise, you want to ensure that your small business is well protected with the right business insurance and that you are in compliance with the rules and regulations that pertain to commercial insurance in your region.

Small Business Information

Read up on economic statistics and insurance information that relates to small business owners in the United States.

Small Business Economic Data In The United States

Here's a look at some information that was compiled by the Small Business Association (SBA) regarding the economic data that pertains to small businesses in the United States:

  • In 2015, small businesses in the United States employed an estimated 58.9 million American workers, or 47.5 percent of the nation's private workforce.
  • Largest shares = fewer than 100 employees. The small businesses that employed 100 people or less had the largest share of employment amount small businesses.
  • Employment increased by nearly 2 percent. In 2018, employment amongst small businesses increased by 1.8 percent, which is an increase of 1 percent from the prior year.
  • Increase in proprietors. In 2016, the number of small business proprietors increased by 2.3 percent.
  • In 2015, small businesses were responsible for creating 1.9 million net jobs. Organizations that employed 20 people or less had the largest gains, as they added an estimated 1.1 million net jobs.
  • There were 5.7 million loans that were value less than $100,000 issued by lenders in the United States in 2016. These loans were issued under the Community Reinvestment Act.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the incorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $50,347 in 2016.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the unincorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $23,060 in 2016.
Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage. The SBA recommends the following insurance plans for small business owners:

  • Commercial Property Insurance: In the case of an unplanned disaster - fire, flood, vandalism, theft, etc. - this type of coverage will help you avoid paying for the damage out of your own pocket. Even if you rent the property, you should still carry commercial property insurance.
  • Commercial Liability Insurance: In the event that a legal situation arises - a negligence lawsuit, for example - commercial liability coverage will provide financial protection. It will cover the cost of legal defense fees, court fees, and even moneys that may be awarded.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: If you operate a vehicle for any activities that are related to your business - transporting and/or delivering goods, or meeting with clients - commercial auto insurance is legally required for businesses of all sizes, including small businesses.

Additional Resources For Commercial Property Insurance

Read up on small business commercial property insurance, including how business property insurance protects your company's building's and/or their contents from damage, destruction, theft and vandalism.


Commercial Real Estate Insurance

Rental property owners, real estate developers and property managers should keep an accurate survey of each property they own or that is in their care. This survey should include inventories of furnishings and equipment at those properties. These documents establish the extent of their insurable interest, facilitate the arrangement and placement of insurance and minimize controversy and confusion if a loss occurs.

Insurance coverage on property, general liability and professional or errors and omissions liability should be arranged and placed for every real estate and rental property risk.

The main goal of any commercial property insurance program is to protect the insured's real and business personal property. Buildings and their contents property usually represents a significant portion of its total assets, regardless of the size of the business. A commercial property program can provide the coverage you need if a loss should occur.

The ISO Commercial Property Building and Personal Property Coverage Form is an insurance industry standard that provides this needed coverage. As a result, it should always be reviewed and used as a benchmark for comparison when evaluating any commercial property coverage form.

This policy treats business personal property as more than just the contents of a building. When there is a limit of insurance on the declarations, property can be covered if inside the building or structure or within 100 feet of the building or premises and either in the open, or even in or on a vehicle.

There are many endorsements available to tailor the ISO Commercial Property Coverage Forms. Some are mandatory for all policies while others are mandatory for specific classifications and types of business. Others are optional and permit a standard form to be customized to meet a specific risk's coverage needs. Endorsements broaden, restrict, delete, modify, or add coverage.

These policies can provide the following additional coverages for small specific limits of insurance: debris removal, preservation of property, fire department service charge, pollutant clean up and removal, increased cost of construction and electronic data.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Signs, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Contractors' Equipment, Fine Arts, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, and Stop Gap Liability.


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