Manufacturing Insurance

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Manufacturing Insurance Policy Information

Manufacturing Insurance

Manufacturing Insurance. Manufacturing is an extremely broad category that includes countless potential hazards and exposures in virtually all coverage areas. Because of this, every individual manufacturer is unique and a specific risk survey of every operation is advisable.

The basic insurance needs for every class of business or operation includes property coverage for buildings, machinery and equipment, as well as for raw stock and finished products. Liability insurance for premises exposures is important but products liability insurance presents greater concerns so these exposures and coverage needs must be evaluated carefully. In addition, protection for injuries to workers, environmental coverages and automobile insurance are priority items.

Choosing the right type and level of manufacturing insurance is important to your business' sustainability, profitability, and health. A combination of coverage keeps your business protected from all possible perils.

Manufacturing insurance protects your business from product liability lawsuits with rates as low as $57/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked manufacturing insurance questions:

How Much Does Manufacturing Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small manufacturing businesses ranges from $57 to $89 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

What Type of Insurance Do Manufacturing Businesses Need?

You likely have significant capital invested in your manufacturing business, and you must protect it with the right level and type of insurance. You must also protect your workers and the production capabilities of your business. There are generally three primary components that make up suitable manufacturing insurance policies for manufacturers. These include:

  • Product liability. Pays for the legal costs when a product you make injures someone or makes them ill.
  • Product recall. Fills the gap caused by the CGL product recall exclusion. This insurance covers the expenses incurred by the insured when it conducts mandated and/or voluntary product recalls.
  • Product contamination. Provides coverage when a product becomes contaminated or may become contaminated. The contamination can be due to an error or due to a criminal act. Coverage also applies when threats are received that contamination will occur unless ransom is paid. Costs that are covered include necessary inventory destruction, lost profits, business interruption, product recall and product rehabilitation. Crisis management, reputational advertising and more damage control measures are often covered too. However, there is no coverage for third-party products liability.
  • Worker's compensation. This essential coverage protects your employees from financial costs of medical claims due to work injuries, accidents, and illnesses. It may or may not be required by the state in which you do business, since requirements vary by state.
  • Commercial auto. Vehicles used for business needs should be protected by commercial auto insurance, including company cars, vans, SUV, and other types of vehicles.

Working with an commercial insurance broker who understands the unique nuances of the manufacturers is important when choosing manufacturing business coverage types. A pro agent can access quotes and information from a variety of insurance companies, help you compare the policies available, and be instrumental in helping you choose the right type of coverage for your unique needs.

What Other Types Of Business Insurance Should Manufacturers Consider?

Covering the assets that your business owns with a manufacturing insurance policy is important to your business' ongoing growth and overall financial health. If someone touring your facility becomes injured and files a claim against you, or if a fire guts your facility and leaves you without a place to manufacture your items, you need to be assured that your business can continue to operate.

In a similar vein, if a key piece of equipment becomes non-operational, you need to be ensured that the piece can be replaced without the need to shut down. Business insurance for manufacturers can be a godsend. Some essential manufacturing insurance policy types include:

  • General liability. General liability coverage provides protection for accidents such as slips-and-falls or when a person in your facility is otherwise injured. It also covers property damage to third parties on your premises. It covers your legal costs and any judgement granted against you.
  • Commercial property. Replace your property that's damaged on the premises with this coverage. It can also be written with endorsements to cover equipment breakdown or supply loss.
  • Business income. In the event of a work stoppage due to a covered peril, income loss coverage can help. It protects the business' building and its equipment if the loss prevents you from continuing your normal operating procedures. It can also combat lost income and operating expenses, generally for a fixed period of one year.
  • Business owner's policy. This coverage combines general liability and commercial property along with business income and other coverages all in one package.

Worker's Comp for Manufacturing Employees

Most states require businesses to maintain coverage for employees in the form of worker's compensation. This valuable manufacturing insurance coverage provides income loss protection and medical bill coverage for workers who are injured or become ill due to a work-related peril. In for any employees that are not owners - this coverage is mandatory. Check with your agent to make sure your manufacturer business is in compliance.

Commercial Vehicle Insurance

A commercial auto policy covers cars, vans, trucks, trailers, and tow trucks, among other vehicles, that might be used in your business. It provides liability overage if you or someone working for you causes or is involved in an accident. The limits you need for your policy should be based on your state's requirements and the level of assets that you need to protect in a worst-case scenario.

Manufacturer's Risks & Exposures

There are many different types of manufacturers - all having some similar and sometimes very different manufacturing processes. Since there are far to many to list here, we have selected some of the more common manufacturing types to show examples of some of the risks they face:

Air-Conditioning and Warm Air Heating Equipment and Commercial and Industrial Refrigeration Equipment Manufacturing Risks & Exposures

Air-Conditioning Manufacturing

Property exposures consist of offices, plant, and warehouse for storage of components and finished goods. Ignition sources include heating and cooling equipment, production machinery, electrical panels, welding, electrical work, spray-painting, and the build-up of dust from the cutting and sanding that can cause fire and explosion. The risk increases in the absence of proper dust collection systems, ventilation, and adequate disposal procedures. Paints, lubricants, degreasers, and solvents can be flammable and must be adequately separated and stored away from other operations. Plastic work may include molding or extrusion. Welding and soldering must be done away from combustibles and flammable liquids.

Metal housing may require soldering, electroplating, or annealing. The metal may be painted by spray or in dip tanks. Spray-painting operations can cause a fire unless carried out in spray booths with explosion-proof electrical components. Testing may produce arcing. Chemicals used in the process may cause noxious fumes and corrosion. Without a sterile environment, circuitry may be contaminated by dust or damaged by static. While refrigerants are generally not flammable, the electrical circuitry and computer component parts may be highly sensitive to smoke, water, and heat damage. A very small fire can cause total damage if there is not adequate separation of the storage from the possible ignition sources.

Air conditioning and heating systems and their components may be targets for theft. Appropriate security controls should be taken including physical barriers to prevent entrance to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Equipment breakdown exposures include breakdown losses to the building services systems, malfunctioning production equipment, dust collection and ventilation systems, electrical control panels and other apparatus. Breakdown and loss of use to the conveyor and other production machinery could result in a significant loss, both direct and under time element.

Crime exposure comes from employee dishonesty and theft of circuitry or precious metal plating. Employees may act alone or in collusion with outsiders in stealing money, raw materials, or finished stock. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements. The manufacturer should have security methods in place to prevent theft.

Inland marine exposures arise from accounts receivable if the manufacturer offers credit, computers (which may include computer-run production equipment), contractors' equipment (forklifts), exhibitions, goods in transit, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. If the manufacturer installs the units they produce, an installation floater is needed. Units being installed may be subject to drop and fall from heights. Other causes of loss include breakage, fire, theft, collision, overturn, and water damage.

Premises liability exposure is normally low due to limited access by visitors. If the facilities are used for tours (such as school field trips), age-appropriate supervision and safety equipment may be required. Fumes and noise may affect neighbors. If the manufacturer installs equipment on customers’ premises, there may be a frequency of property damage claims. There may be significant off-premises exposures at promotional events.

Products liability exposure varies depending on the type of unit and the customer. Gas-fueled products have the highest exposure due to the potential for explosion and carbon monoxide poisoning which can result in bodily injury, death, or property damage. Units may overheat or tip, resulting in fire, or produce dangerous emissions that can sicken or kill customers. Units that operate at 220 voltage present a higher potential for life-threatening shocks. Internal fuses are important to prevent overloads. Boilers can burst under pressure, causing significant property damage or bodily injuries.

Warning labels regarding dangers of personal injury are important, but provide only limited defense, especially in the case of inherently dangerous household products. Testing and quality control are vital. Product recall procedures should be in place. Governmental regulations, guidelines, and standards must be observed. Older appliances made before improved safety features were introduced may still be in use.

Environmental impairment liability exposure may be very high due to possible contamination of ground, air, and water from chemicals and toxic lubricants, solvents and paints. For plastics, the raw materials may be toxic and are flammable, the catalysts may be caustic, and the final product is usually not biodegradable. For wood and metal, contaminants may come from the chemicals, paints, and solvents used. Storage and disposal procedures must adhere to all EPA and other regulatory standards.

Commercial auto exposure may be high if the manufacturer picks up raw materials or delivers finished goods to customers. Manufacturers generally have private passenger fleets used by sales representatives. There should be written procedures regarding the private use of these vehicles by others. Drivers should have an appropriate license and an acceptable MVR. All vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept in a central location.

Workers compensation exposures can be very high. Injuries from production machinery are common, as are minor cuts, puncture wounds, burns, foreign objects in the eye, hearing impairment from noise, slips, trips, falls, back injuries from lifting, and repetitive motion injuries. Drivers of forklifts and vehicles may be injured in accidents or rollovers. Working with electronics can result in electrocution. Workstations should be ergonomically designed. Chemical exposures could result in skin and eye irritations, as well as respiratory problems.

Employees must be fully informed as to the potential effects of the chemicals, including long-term occupational disease hazards so that they can be aware of warning symptoms and obtain treatment as early as possible. The high volume required for production schedules may lead workers to remove guards on the machinery, or to postpone maintenance and repair to increase production.

Clothing Manufacturing Risks & Exposures

Clothing Manufacturing

Property exposures consist of an office, production plant, and warehouse for raw materials and finished goods. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating systems, and production machinery. Chemicals used in fabric dyeing or coating are often flammable and should be properly labeled, separated, and stored in approved containers. Dust from textile processing operations can explode if ignited. This hazard increases in the absence of well-maintained dust collection systems attached to the knitting and cutting stations.

Fabrics (raw materials, supplies, scrap and finished goods) and foam fillers are often highly combustible, especially if poorly stored without adequate aisle space and shelving. Fabric is susceptible to damage by fire or smoke, water and moisture, or temperature. Minor fires may result in major inventory losses. Poor housekeeping, such as failure to collect and dispose of scraps on a regular basis, could contribute significantly to a loss. Unless disposed of properly, greasy, oily rags (such as those used to clean machinery) can cause a fire without a separate ignition source. Appropriate security controls must be taken including physical barriers to prevent entrance to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Equipment breakdown exposures include malfunctioning production equipment, dust collection and ventilation systems, electrical control panels and other apparatus. These should be properly maintained and records kept in a central location.

Crime exposure comes from employee dishonesty and theft. Employees may act alone or in collusion with outsiders in stealing money, raw materials or finished stock. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements. There should be security methods in place to prevent theft.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the manufacturer offers credit, computers (which may include computer-run production equipment), exhibitions, goods in transit, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. Backup copies of all records should be made and stored off premises. Goods in transit may be damaged by fire, collision, overturn, and theft or water damage.

Premises liability exposure is normally low due to limited access by visitors. If the manufacturer has a showroom or offers tours, visitors may be injured by slips, trips, or falls. Chemicals used in the coating and finishing may be corrosive and/or toxic. Fumes, spills or leaks may cause serious injury or property damage to neighboring premises.

Products liability exposure is normally light unless infants', children's wear or sleepwear is manufactured or if there are other special conditioning or fabric treatment processes. Infants' and children’s clothing must meet all federal flammability guidelines.

Environmental impairment exposure is light unless the manufacturer performs any fabric dyeing or chemical treating. Fumes and improper disposal of scrap can result in air, ground, or water contamination. Disposal procedures must adhere to all EPA and other regulatory standards.

Business auto exposure may be high if the manufacturer transports raw materials or finished products. Manufacturers generally have private passenger fleets used by sales representatives. There should be written procedures regarding the private use of these vehicles by others. Drivers should have an appropriate license and an acceptable MVR. All vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept in a central location.

Workers compensation exposures can be moderate to high. Injuries from production machinery are common, as are burns, cuts, slips, trips, falls, foreign objects in the eye, hearing loss from machinery noise, and back injuries from lifting. Employees should be provided with safety training and protective equipment. Areas that generate dust require respiratory protection devices, as well as eye protection and eye wash stations. Flammable liquids and chemicals used to treat fabrics can cause skin irritation, eye irritation and possible long-term occupational disease.

The high volume required for production schedules may lead workers to remove guards on the machinery, or to postpone maintenance and repair. Repetitive motion injuries can result from ongoing use of machinery. Workstations should be ergonomically designed.

Safety consciousness and commitment of management, especially in the form of ongoing enforcement and awareness programs, are important considerations. A large amount of the piece work may be done by individuals whose status (employee or independent contractor) must be clear. Production incentives can be a disincentive to safety if the only consideration is by piece production.

Jewelry Manufacturing Risks & Exposures

Jewelry Manufacturing

Property exposures consist of office, plant or shop and warehouse for raw materials and finished goods. Ignition sources can include electrical wiring, heating and cooling equipment, production machinery, and dust explosions. Metalworking hazards can include brazing, grinding, heat-treating, and welding. Plastic can catch on fire and explode, producing a heavy black smoke that impedes firefighting efforts. Flammable liquids may be used for finishing and polishing. These should be properly labeled and stored away from combustibles.

Due to the theft limitations on jewelry in standard property policies, most manufacturers should purchase jewelers block policies to obtain adequate limits. As fires are often used to cover up a theft, controlling the theft exposure also reduces the exposure to fire. Appropriate security controls should be taken including physical barriers to prevent entrance to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department.

Equipment breakdown exposures include malfunctioning production equipment, dust collection and ventilation systems, electrical control panels and other apparatus. Breakdown and loss of use of the production machinery could result in a significant loss, both direct and indirect, especially, time element.

Crime exposure from employee dishonesty and theft is very high if the manufacturer works with precious or semiprecious metals or gemstones due to their high street value. Employees may act alone or in collusion with outsiders in stealing money, raw materials, or finished stock. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable if the manufacturer offers credit, bailees customers, computers (which may include computer-run production equipment), exhibitions, goods in transit, jewelers block, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. While the primary hazard is theft, the items are also susceptible to other causes of loss, including breakage and transit exposures. There is a significant bailee exposure for sizing, cleaning, engraving, and repairing items for customers. Safes or vaults should be burglar- and fire-resistant.

Premises liability exposure is normally low as access by visitors is limited. If the manufacturer has a showroom or offers tours, visitors may be injured by slips, trips, or falls. Fumes, dust, and noise from metalwork or gem polishing could pose a nuisance hazard to neighbors. Off-premises retail locations or showrooms may be used to meet with customers.

Products liability exposure is generally low. Some metals produce allergic reactions when worn. Labeling of components as nonallergenic or hypoallergenic should be supported by quality control. If children's jewelry is made, lead paint and cadmium are a particular concern, as well as choking hazards from small components such as beads.

Environmental impairment exposure can be moderate to high depending on the materials and processes used and the types of waste that are produced. Plastics and fiberglass may be toxic and are flammable, the catalysts may be caustic, and the final product is usually not biodegradable. Contaminants from chemicals, paints, and solvents used in metalworking processes can pollute the air, surface or ground water, or soil. Disposal procedures must adhere to all EPA and other regulatory standards.

Commercial auto exposure may be high if the manufacturer transports raw materials or finished products. Manufacturers generally have private passenger fleets used by sales representatives. There should be written procedures regarding the private use of these vehicles by others. Each driver should have an appropriate license and an acceptable MVR. All vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept in a central location. Because of the high market value of jewelry, vehicles should be locked, fitted with alarms, and not left unattended once loaded or during transport.

Workers compensation exposure can be very high. Injuries from production machinery are common, as are burns, cuts, slips, trips, falls, and foreign objects in the eye, hearing loss from machinery noise, repetitive motion injuries, and back injuries from lifting. There should be safety training, protective equipment, and guarding of machines. Workstations should be ergonomically designed. Dust generated by metalwork or grinding of stones and gems requires respiratory protection devices, as well as eye protection and eye wash stations. Work with plastics, flammable liquids and chemicals can cause skin irritation, eye irritation, and possible long-term occupational disease. Drivers of forklifts and vehicles may be injured in accidents. Sales representatives carrying precious gems or metals may be injured or killed in holdups.

Getting Quotes for Manufacturing Insurance

It makes sense to get multiple quotes for your vehicle from different companies in order to get the right manufacturing insurance coverage at the right price. Protecting your income, productivity, and assets is paramount to the success of your business. Work with your agent to get the best value for your money on coverage that fully protects you from all potential perils.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Additional Resources For Manufacturing & Wholesaler Insurance

Read informative articles on small business manufacturing and wholesale insurance. Manufacturing and wholesale companies face many risks due to the nature of their business operations.


Manufacturing And Wholesale Insurance

For manufacturers and wholesalers, having the proper coverage is very important. You will need Products/Completed Operations Liability Coverage to protect you against injuries or property damage cause my the products you make or sell.

Manufacturing is an extremely broad category that includes countless potential hazards and exposures in virtually all coverage areas. Because of this, every individual manufacturer is unique and a specific risk survey of every operation is advisable.

The basic insurance needs for every class of business or operation includes property coverage for buildings, machinery and equipment, as well as for raw stock and finished products. Liability insurance for premises exposures is important but products liability insurance presents greater concerns so these exposures and coverage needs must be evaluated carefully.

In addition, protection for injuries to workers, environmental coverages and automobile insurance are priority items.

Wholesale and distribution operations have many of the same physical damage and property coverage concerns as warehouse operations. In both, the value of both real property and stocks of merchandise is very high. Loss control and other techniques appropriate to the types of merchandise involved are needed. For these reasons, adequate and appropriate property insurance coverages are important.

The commercial auto exposure can also be significant, based on the extent of merchandise delivery. In addition, transportation or motor truck cargo insurance on the merchandise must also be arranged.

Employee theft is always an issue and can be a significant exposure, depending on the type of property involved. Finally, the types of merchandise and material handled makes workers compensation insurance another very important coverage.

What does the insured does that could result in a covered loss? The insuring agreement only requires that the insured be legally obligated to pay damages for injury to others or damage to their property included within the products-completed operations hazard covered by the insurance.

Because of this, every product manufactured and completed operation exposure for each named insured must be determined, described and evaluated to be certain that each represents acceptable exposures, or are acceptable classes of business to the insurance company providing coverage.

Once the extent of all business activities and operations is determined, the process of identifying hazards begins. The first step in the process is completely listing and describing all current products being manufactured and projects being worked on.

The next step is obtaining the same information for discontinued products and completed projects for the past five to 10 years, depending on the products or projects involved. This should include an explanation of why the products were discontinued. If some completed projects were of a different type than those currently being worked on, an explanation is in order, including whether the insured may resume them in the future.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income with Extra Expense, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Bailees Customers, Computers, Goods in Transit, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Environmental Impairment Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Flood, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


Manufacturing Insurance
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