Machine Shop Insurance

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Machine Shop Insurance Policy Information

Machine Shop Insurance

Machine Shop Insurance. As a machine shop owner or operator, you offer a variety of products and services to the clients that you serve. For example, you might create unique items for your customers, or you may offer repair services for companies that utilize certain types of machinery. Machine shops in receive unfinished parts from customers, generally manufacturers, and then grind, bore, or perform other processes based on the customers' specifications.

The traditional job shop does a low volume but offers high-quality work, such as grinding teeth into gear blanks or boring precision holes into forged or cast parts. Other job shops handle high-volume work, commonly using computerized (CNC) lathes to thread screws, bolts, and similar items.

Larger shops may provide expanded services to include such finish work as deburring, heat treating, or electroplating. The shop's specialty is often based on the equipment that they have available. Like contractors, they may bid on jobs and receive contracts with set terms and conditions.

No matter what the specifics of your business may be, as the proprietor of your machine shop, you have a lot of responsibilities and are liable for any mishaps and mistakes that can happen. In order to ensure that your employees and customers are safe and satisfied - and in order to ensure that your business is safe and you are protected - it's important to make sure that you carry the right type of insurance coverage.

If you've just opened your own shop, trying to navigate the world of insurance can be confusing. To help you make the best possible choices and to ensure that you are well protected, keep on reading to find out why insurance is so important and what type of machine shop insurance coverage you should invest in.

Machine shop insurance protects custom machining, electroplaters, foundries, machine parts manufacturers, or metal finisher operations from lawsuits with rates as low as $77/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

How Much Does Machine Shop Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small machine shops ranges from $77 to $89 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

Why do Machining Shops Need Insurance?

Running a machine shop can be extremely rewarding; however, it also comes with a lot of responsibilities. Third-parties or employees could become injured, your equipment could malfunction or become damaged, the property your shop is located in might be vandalized, or a client could file a lawsuit against you alleging that a member of your crew damaged their property.

The above-mentioned scenarios are just some of the incidents that could arise. If something serious should happen, as the proprietor of the business, you will be held liable. That means that you could end up having to pay a significant amount of money in order to repair or replace damaged property, cover the cost of medical expenses, and pay for legal fees. Having to pay such costs could put you in financial ruin. Ultimately, you could end up filing for bankruptcy or even having to shut down your business.

Having the right type of machine shop insurance coverage will protect you from financial burden. Should a client become injured while visiting your shop and file a lawsuit, for example, commercial insurance will cover the cost of any necessary medical bills, as well as legal fees.

What Type Of Insurance Do Machine Shop Owners Need?

Do to the nature of owning and operating a machine shop, there are several different types of insurance policies that are recommended for individuals in this industry. Some coverages are compulsory, meaning that you are legally required to carry them, and some are optional; however, it is strongly recommended that you consider investing in the policies that you aren't obligated to carry in order to avoid serious losses and financial hardship. Some of the types of policies that machine shop owners should carry include:

  • General Liability. You probably have a lot of heavy machinery at your shop. Should a customer, vendor, or any other third-party become injured by any piece of machinery, bodily injury insurance will help to pay for the necessary medical care. It will also help to cover the cost of legal fees should a lawsuit be filed against you.
  • Commercial Property. This type of coverage protects your business - both the physical structure and the contents inside of it - should an act of nature or vandalism occur.
  • Products and Completed Operations. If any of the products that you offer or the services that you provide malfunction and harm a customer after the service or purchase was completed, this type of insurance coverage will protect you.
  • Workers' Compensation. When a member of your staff is injured on the job or suffers a work-related illness, workers' comp insurance will pay for the employee's medical care, lost wages, and even any job training that he or she might require. It can also cover legal fees, should the injured employee file a lawsuit against you.

These are just some of the different types of policies that machine shop owners should carry. You can purchase individual policies; or, you might be able to invest in a policy that lumps several different coverages together.

Machining Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is higher than for other metal working operations as customers need to be on premises to review the process and to evaluate the ability of the firm to deliver the product desired. If customers put their own employees on site for quality control purposes, these employees are subject to the same hazards as the machine shop's employees. Other visitors may be injured by slips, trips, or falls. Fumes, dust, and noise from metal work could affect neighboring properties.

Products liability exposure may be very high if the final product is a critical operating part or system (such as parts for autos, aircraft, watercraft, military uses, or industrial machinery). The machine shop may be more concerned about their ability to handle the customer's specifications rather than evaluating the end use of the product and what could happen should the part fail.

It may be impossible to defend against questionable claims unless there is an aggressive quality control program including high standards for materials, testing and monitoring of components, and documentation of sources (often down to the individual item in a run). If the machine shop is following specifications provided by the customer, the contract may limit the exposure. Hazards increase without contracts that clearly describe the responsibilities of the machine shop and the quality standards that must be met for customer satisfaction. Older parts made before improved safety features were introduced may still be in use.

Environmental impairment liability exposure may be significant due to possible contamination of ground, air, and water from the chemicals, paint, and solvents used. Disposal of wastes must adhere to all federal and state guidelines.

Workers compensation exposure is moderate to high. Workers on a production line with punch presses and cutting machines can suffer severe loss from cuts or amputations as they push to meet quotas. Eye injuries from metal shavings and skin irritations from chemicals are additional causes of loss. Common injuries include slips, trips, falls, back injuries from lifting and material handling, hearing loss from noise, and repetitive motion injuries.

Workstations should be ergonomically designed. Employees should be provided with safety training and protective equipment. Jobs are bid and deadlines set with penalties if timeframes are not met. The high volume required for production schedules may lead workers to remove guards on the machinery, or to postpone maintenance and repair to increase production.

Property exposures consist of an office, production plant, and warehouse for storage of raw materials and finished goods. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating systems, production machinery, and sparks from grinding or lathe operations. Many stages of the work have low fire potential since most machines are cutting and punching devices, and the parts are all metal.

Grinding and lathe operations may generate dust and sparks that could cause a fire or explosion. The risk increases in the absence of proper dust collection systems, ventilation, and adequate disposal procedures. Degreasers and solvents may be flammable and must be adequately controlled. Poor housekeeping may be a serious fire hazard. Unless disposed of properly, greasy, oily rags (such as those used to clean the machinery) can cause a fire without a separate ignition source.

There is often a significant amount of property of others exposure that may be better insured on an inland marine bailees customers form. Business income can be a significant exposure if the machines are special-ordered for a specific job.

Equipment breakdown exposures include malfunctioning production equipment, electrical control panels, and other apparatus. A lengthy breakdown to production machinery could result in a severe loss, both direct and under time element.

Crime exposures are chiefly from employee dishonesty, especially for high-tech parts or exotic metals. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements. The manufacturer should have security methods in place to prevent theft.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the manufacturer offers credit, bailees customers for goods belonging to others, computers (which may include computer-run production equipment), goods in transit, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. Items being treated that belong to customers are subject to the same causes of loss as property owned by the machine shop, plus transit and the processing itself. For goods in transit, the primary causes of loss are fire, theft, collision, overturn, and water damage.

Business auto exposure can be high if the machine shop picks up raw materials or customers' property or delivers finished parts. Deadlines placed on drivers (such as just-in-time processing schedules) increase the hazard. Drivers should be trained in handling whatever product they are required to carry, including the tie-down of unwieldy pieces of metal.

Manufacturers generally have private passenger fleets used by sales representatives. There should be written procedures regarding the private use of these vehicles by others. Drivers should have an appropriate license and an acceptable MVR. All vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept in a central location.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 3599 Industrial and Commercial Machinery and Equipment, NEC
  • NAICS CODE: 332710 Machine Shops
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 97220
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 3632

Machine Shop Insurance Coverage

For the safety of yourself, your employees, and your livelihood, having the right machine shop insurance coverage is essential. To find out what types of options are available to you, how much coverage you should invest in, and how much your coverage will cost, speak to a reputable insurance broker.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Manufacturing & Wholesaler Insurance

Read informative articles on small business manufacturing and wholesale insurance. Manufacturing and wholesale companies face many risks due to the nature of their business operations.


Manufacturing And Wholesale Insurance

For manufacturers and wholesalers, having the proper coverage is very important. You will need Products/Completed Operations Liability Coverage to protect you against injuries or property damage cause my the products you make or sell.

Manufacturing is an extremely broad category that includes countless potential hazards and exposures in virtually all coverage areas. Because of this, every individual manufacturer is unique and a specific risk survey of every operation is advisable.

The basic insurance needs for every class of business or operation includes property coverage for buildings, machinery and equipment, as well as for raw stock and finished products. Liability insurance for premises exposures is important but products liability insurance presents greater concerns so these exposures and coverage needs must be evaluated carefully.

In addition, protection for injuries to workers, environmental coverages and automobile insurance are priority items.

Wholesale and distribution operations have many of the same physical damage and property coverage concerns as warehouse operations. In both, the value of both real property and stocks of merchandise is very high. Loss control and other techniques appropriate to the types of merchandise involved are needed. For these reasons, adequate and appropriate property insurance coverages are important.

The commercial auto exposure can also be significant, based on the extent of merchandise delivery. In addition, transportation or motor truck cargo insurance on the merchandise must also be arranged.

Employee theft is always an issue and can be a significant exposure, depending on the type of property involved. Finally, the types of merchandise and material handled makes workers compensation insurance another very important coverage.

What does the insured does that could result in a covered loss? The insuring agreement only requires that the insured be legally obligated to pay damages for injury to others or damage to their property included within the products-completed operations hazard covered by the insurance.

Because of this, every product manufactured and completed operation exposure for each named insured must be determined, described and evaluated to be certain that each represents acceptable exposures, or are acceptable classes of business to the insurance company providing coverage.

Once the extent of all business activities and operations is determined, the process of identifying hazards begins. The first step in the process is completely listing and describing all current products being manufactured and projects being worked on.

The next step is obtaining the same information for discontinued products and completed projects for the past five to 10 years, depending on the products or projects involved. This should include an explanation of why the products were discontinued. If some completed projects were of a different type than those currently being worked on, an explanation is in order, including whether the insured may resume them in the future.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income with Extra Expense, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Bailees Customers, Computers, Goods in Transit, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Environmental Impairment Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Flood, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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