LLC Insurance (Quotes, Cost & Coverage)

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Frequently Asked Questions About
Commercial General Liability Insurance

How much does commercial insurance cost?

Costs can vary widely based on industry and are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. Request a free quote to get an exact number.

What kind of business insurance do I need?

Most business owners need General Liability Insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you will need workers compensation insurance too.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance is proof of coverage. It lists the type and amount of liability coverage you have and other policy information when a third party requests it.

Is business insurance tax deductible?

Yes. you can deduct the cost of commercial insurance premiums. The IRS considers insurance a cost of doing business as long it benefits the business & serves a business purpose.

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LLC Insurance

LLC Insurance

LLC Insurance. Separating your personal liability from that of your business is a key reason for choosing the Limited Liability Company or LLC structure for your business. Business owners choosing LLC structures do so in order to protect their businesses in the event they face liability insurance claims or lawsuits in the future.

Finding an appropriate level of LLC insurance to protect the business from any gaps in coverage is an essential for smart business owners. We can help businesses with LLC structures to find the right LLC insurance coverage for their particular requirements and risks. A local agent is adept and knowledgeable with the regulations for, and the agent can work with individual business owners to customize an LLC policy for the needs of their businesses.

LLC insurance protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

For instance, an LLC structure does not protect a business owner who:

  • Personally insures another person.
  • Guarantees a business debt or loan personally.
  • Fails to manage the businesses tax responsibility appropriately.
  • Commits a crime that damages the company.
  • Engages in reckless or fraudulent behavior that causes harm to the company.
  • Mixes personal and business expenses or accounts, failing to treat the business as a separate entity.

Is the LLC Structure the Same as Insurance?

Although the LLC structure protects assets of business owners in many circumstances, business owners may find themselves held responsible for work performed by them on behalf of their companies.

Simply having a business structured as an LLC does not protect the business from all potential risks. The business is still responsible for its own actions and the actions of employees. This is where LLC insurance can help in certain circumstances.

To better understand the limitations of an LLC, it is important to understand what is known as "piercing the corporate veil." It is generally accepted that an Limited Liability Company structure forms a sort of veil between the business owners' personal finances and the business' operations. Nonetheless, even with an LLC in place, there are some types of errors and activities that give the legal system the capability to pierce this corporate veil, such as when an LLC takes on too much debt. In this case, it may be possible for the business owner to be held responsible for the debt, especially if it is deemed excessive.

A consultation with an insurance agent who understand LLCs- insurance and advice from a knowledgeable business attorney skilled in corporate law can help business owners to evaluate their specific risks, the need for LLC insurance and in what amounts, so that the business and the business owner is fully covered in the event an incident occurs.

Requirements for LLC Insurance

Each state government sets the LLC requirements for the particular state. It is important that business owners comply with these laws prior to the commencement of operations. Some types of requirements for business often include:

State Unemployment insurance (SUI) tax. requires that SUI tax is paid by businesses. This type of tax covers the cost of SUI insurance for employees who are laid off or lose their jobs due to other covered reasons.

Worker's compensation coverage. requires worker's compensation coverage provided by businesses, including LLCs. Each state has specific requirements that must be met in order to be in compliance. For example in you must provide this coverage if you have or more employees - but you can exclude the owners.

LLCs and Property Insurance Coverage

Of all the LLC insurance types available for businesses, property insurance is among the most crucial. All businesses should purchase property insurance to protect them from loss due to covered perils, such as wind or fire. Basic property policies cover a variety of potential hazards, including the building in which the business is housed and any inventory or equipment inside the building. business owners should closely examine their property insurance coverage to ensure that nothing that is important to them is excluded.

There are three basic types of property insurance for commercial businesses. These include:

  • Basic coverage. This type of coverage is structured much like a homeowner's policy and covers perils such as vandalism, natural disasters, and fire. It may cover theft, but this is not always the case.
  • Broad coverage. A broad coverage policy covers more perils than a basic policy.
  • Special form. This type of coverage does not list for the policy owner what it covers, but instead offers a list of uncovered perils.

Regardless of policy type, damage and loss caused by flooding not covered on basic policy. Flood insurance is usually a separate type of insurance for business owners, and it is a must in flood-prone and flood zone areas.

LLCs and Liability Insurance

When a business' activities pierce the corporate veil, business owners can be held liable. liability insurance for LLCs protects the business and business owner should the business find itself on the receiving end of a lawsuit or claim. Preparing for any potential risks involves evaluation of a business' specific needs by a qualified and seasoned agent. There are several options to consider, including:

  • General liability insurance. This type of policy covers injuries to customers while they are on the business' property or slander accusations resulting in claims. The policy usually provides for medical costs, legal defense costs, and the costs of settling with claimants or paying judgments.
  • Product liability insurance. For businesses that manufacture, distribute, or sell products, product liability coverage protects the business from claims resulting from claims of personal injury or property claims resulting from using a faulty product.
  • Professional liability insurance. Also known as E&O or errors and omissions coverage, this type of insurance is essential for LLCs who provide professional services to their clients, such as financial advisors, lawyers and doctors. For instance, a doctor need malpractice insurance specially written for members of the medical community. By contrast, E&O insurance for an investment broker protects him against losses resulting from advice he gives to clients.
  • Directors and officers liability coverage. When an officer or director of a company is named in a legal suit, D&O, or directors and officers coverages, protects the company from liability.

LLC coverage comes in many other forms, personalized for the business' specific needs. For instance, fleet insurance or commercial vehicle insurance is available for businesses who drive company vehicles. The insurance covers any losses sustained by the business as a result if the company's driver causes an accident. Business interruption coverage is another type of LLC Insurance to consider for all businesses. This coverage keeps the business running by covering expenses during a displacement from the business' location due to natural disasters, fires, and other covered perils.

LLC Insurance Costs

The type of business and its specific needs determine the ultimate cost of LLC insurance coverage. Other factors that may influence the cost of insurance are the type of industry; industries that are prone to litigation may pay more for insurance. The number of employees in the business may also affect costs.

Small businesses with minimal risks may pay just a few hundred dollars annually to obtain adequate insurance for an LLC, while larger businesses may pay substantially more. Working with an experienced agent is the best way to find a policy tailored to your business' specific needs and risks.

Small Business Economic Data & Insurance Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. Maybe you want to contribute to the economic growth of your community. Whatever the reason is, if you're thinking about starting a small business, it's important to understand pertinent information relating to small businesses in the United States; namely economic information and insurance regulations. After all, if you want your small business to succeed, you have to understand the economic trends organizations of a similar size in your area.

Likewise, you want to ensure that your small business is well protected with the right business insurance and that you are in compliance with the rules and regulations that pertain to commercial insurance in your region.

Small Business Information

Read up on economic statistics and insurance information that relates to small business owners in the United States.

Small Business Economic Data In The United States

Here's a look at some information that was compiled by the Small Business Association (SBA) regarding the economic data that pertains to small businesses in the United States:

  • In 2015, small businesses in the United States employed an estimated 58.9 million American workers, or 47.5 percent of the nation's private workforce.
  • Largest shares = fewer than 100 employees. The small businesses that employed 100 people or less had the largest share of employment amount small businesses.
  • Employment increased by nearly 2 percent. In 2018, employment amongst small businesses increased by 1.8 percent, which is an increase of 1 percent from the prior year.
  • Increase in proprietors. In 2016, the number of small business proprietors increased by 2.3 percent.
  • In 2015, small businesses were responsible for creating 1.9 million net jobs. Organizations that employed 20 people or less had the largest gains, as they added an estimated 1.1 million net jobs.
  • There were 5.7 million loans that were value less than $100,000 issued by lenders in the United States in 2016. These loans were issued under the Community Reinvestment Act.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the incorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $50,347 in 2016.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the unincorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $23,060 in 2016.
Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage. The SBA recommends the following insurance plans for small business owners:

  • Commercial Property Insurance: In the case of an unplanned disaster - fire, flood, vandalism, theft, etc. - this type of coverage will help you avoid paying for the damage out of your own pocket. Even if you rent the property, you should still carry commercial property insurance.
  • Commercial Liability Insurance: In the event that a legal situation arises - a negligence lawsuit, for example - commercial liability coverage will provide financial protection. It will cover the cost of legal defense fees, court fees, and even moneys that may be awarded.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: If you operate a vehicle for any activities that are related to your business - transporting and/or delivering goods, or meeting with clients - commercial auto insurance is legally required for businesses of all sizes, including small businesses.

Additional Resources For Small Business Insurance

Protect your company and employees with the right commercial insurance policies. Read informative articles on small business insurance coverages - and how they can help shield your company from legal liabilities.


Small Business Commercial Insurance

Your small business faces many potential disasters including: fire, floods, theft, equipment breakdown, lawsuits from clients or customers and current & former employees. Any many other risks you haven't even thought about.

A small business commercial insurance program should provide protection for both larger and smaller disasters. The obvious things like fire, flood and theft most business owners thnk about... but what if a hacker infects your computers with a virus - and files containing private customer information like credit card and Social Security numbers are stolen?

Who is going to pay to fix your customers credit rating etc.? Will your insurance pay for the cost? You need to know that.

Your commercial insurance program should cover events that can close down your company, or cause it to lose revenue. Anything less than that is not enough coverage. Commmercial insurance doesn't cover everything, and all policies have exclusions and limits.

You need a written plan that allows you to get your operations back up and running as quick as possible.



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LLC Insurance
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Quotes from leading small business insurance carriers including: ACE, AmTrust, Chubb, Cincinnati, CNA, Colony, Employers, Evanston, Fireman's, Foremost, Guard, Hanover, Hiscox, Liberty Mutual, LLoyd's of London, Markel, MSA, Nationwide, Penn America, Philadelphia, Prime, Progressive, Scottsdale, The Hartford, Travelers, USLI, Utica First, Western World, Zurich & others.

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