Prosthetists Insurance Georgia

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Prosthetists Insurance Georgia Policy Information

GA Prosthetists Insurance

Prosthetists Insurance Georgia. Prosthetists are medical professionals who have the rewarding and exciting job of helping patients who have lost (portions of) their upper and lower extremities make their new prostheses, fitted onto their residual limbs, serve them well.

Prosthetists make replacements for amputated, deformed, or missing body parts. Prosthetists receive a prescription from the client's physician and then work with a client to assemble and fit a prosthetic based on the prescription and the client's comfort.

Component parts for prostheses, such as breast, foot, hip, knee, or wrist, are ordered from manufacturers. Sockets or other connectors that attach the part to the body are customized through the use of casting materials to fit the client's body.

These may be plastic, metal, or a combination of materials. The prosthetist works with the client to make adjustments and corrections as needed throughout the life of the device. Prosthetics can be very basic or contain very sophisticated computer-aided electronics.

Over the course of their activities, prosthetists craft sockets that form a bridge between the prosthesis and residual limb, adjusting prostheses to make them fit better, and helping patients get used to performing daily activities with their new prostheses.

Prosthetists may work in hospitals or specialized clinics, but they can also run their own practices.

Regardless of the setting in which a prosthetist performs their job, these medical professionals can be exposed to a number of perils - all of which can have costly consequences as well as potentially damaging their professional reputation.

By carrying comprehensive insurance, a prosthetist can protect themselves at least from significant economic harm. What types of prosthetists insurance Georgia coverage are needed, though? This brief guide offers some answers.

Prosthetists insurance Georgia protects healthcare professionals that make and fit artificial limbs - from lawsuits with rates as low as $67/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Georgia Prosthetists Need Insurance?

Prosthetists, whether they work as employees of a hospital or other medical facility or run their own clinics, will require professional insurance to protect them from the perils they could face over the course of their work.

The kinds of coverage a GA prosthetist needs will depend greatly on whether they run their own business or work for another institution, however.

Prosthetists employed by hospitals or clinics primarily need to consider a scenario in which a patient alleges that the prosthetist caused them harm. This may be due to negligent care or because the working environment caused them to become injured, for example.

Prosthetists running their own clinics further have to consider risks such as acts of nature (including earthquakes, wildfires, and hurricanes), vandalism, and theft.

Because the risks faced vary greatly, it is crucial for them to consider their prosthetists insurance Georgia needs in-depth.

What Type Of Insurance Do GA Prosthetists Need?

Prosthetists will have broad professional experience with the fact that one size never fits all - and insurance coverage is no different than prostheses in this regard.

An GA insurance broker who is deeply familiar with the risks medical professionals face is best suited to design a plan tailored to your individual needs, taking into account all the risks you are exposed to.

With that in mind, some of the more common types of prosthetists insurance Georgia to consider are:

  • Orthotist Prosthetist Medical Malpractice: This is the main type of coverage that every prosthetist will need to carry, regardless of their workplace. It serves to protect your financial interest in the case of malpractice lawsuits alleging, among other scenarios, negligent care and HIPAA violations. Should you be sued, malpractice insurance covers your legal defense costs as well as settlement costs, with upper limits varying with each individual policy.
  • General Liability: Prosthetists running solo practices will also need general liability coverage for commonplace scenarios in which third parties sustain bodily injury or property damage - like tripping on poorly maintained driveways or a fire that started in your practice spreading to a neighboring property. General liability insurance also covers scenarios in which unfortunate marketing led to false impressions.
  • Commercial Property:This kind of prosthetists insurance Georgia coverage is, again, for prosthetists who run their own practices. It would cover damage and loss to physical assets, including the building from which you operate, after perils such as theft, vandalism, or acts of nature.
  • Hands/Disability Insurance: Prosthetists depend on their hands to carry out their profession. Policies specifically designed to insure the hands of professionals who cannot carry out their work in the event they lose use of their hands exists. A more general disability insurance may fulfill a similar role, however.

Bear in mind that these examples of types of prosthetists insurance Georgia the may be needed do not universally apply. The sole type of insurance all GA prosthetists will require is medical malpractice insurance.

For further information, you are advised to consult a business insurance broker who will be able to offer advice specific to your circumstances.

GA Prosthetists' Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures are moderate as clients may visit the premises for casts and fittings. The client may have mobility limitations which will require the technician to protect the client from injuries that may occur due to falling during fittings and initial use of the device.

All areas accessible to clients must be well maintained with floor covering in good condition. The number of exits must be sufficient and well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure.

Steps should have handrails. Parking lots should be maintained free of ice and show. Improper touching and other privacy issues are concerns due to casting and fitting procedures. Off-premises liability exposures arise if technicians travel to hospitals, other institutions, or clients' homes.

Products liability exposures are significant as prostheses are used to replace clients' body parts. The exposure increases if the organization fails to conduct thorough background checks to verify employees' credentials, education, and licensing when required by the state.

When a prosthetic device fails, clients can fall and injure themselves or drop what they were lifting, causing injury to another person or property. As patients may have allergic reactions to some of the materials used in the prosthesis, the referring physician should be advised of all materials used.

Improper fitting or adverse reactions to materials can lead to sores, infections and subsequent physical problems. Quality control with regular follow-up and documentation should be in place. Children's prosthetics present special concerns because the devices must be altered and adjusted frequently as the child grows.

Environmental impairment exposure is significant due to the potential for contaminating air, ground, or water by improperly disposing of medical waste or waste from materials used in making prostheses. Disposal must be documented and meet all FDA and EPA standards.

Workers compensation exposures are high. Back injuries can occur as the mobility limitations of many clients require assistance during fittings and while learning to use the prosthetic devices. The technician may be injured while lifting clients, being accidentally struck by a patient, or by overexertion of the arms and back muscles. Slipping and tripping hazards can be prevented with excellent housekeeping.

Common injuries include contact dermatitis, cuts, foreign objects in the eye, and hearing impairment from noise. Ergonomically designed workstations can prevent repetitive motion injury.

Assembly of devices presents some hazard due to working with tools and component parts. If workers come into contact with bodily fluids, diseases may be transferred from the client to the worker.

Property exposures are from the specialized equipment used to make prostheses. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating, and cooling equipment, and overheating of production machinery. Electrical wiring must be grounded and meet all current codes. The materials are usually low hazard from a fire standpoint and supplies on hand are minimal since orders are customized.

The casting material and repair devices usually do not contribute to the fire load. All equipment is external so sterile components are not major issues. If the prosthetist is involved with robotics or electronic controlled devices, the susceptibility to damage by fire, smoke or water increases dramatically along with the value of the inventory. Coverage for the property of others is important since the devices may be left with the prosthetist for repair or further customizing.

Business income and extra expense depend on the types of prosthetics being provided and availability of the items.

Equipment breakdown exposure is due to the specialized equipment used in making prostheses. A breakdown could be costly due to the time to install replacement parts or the lack of appropriate backup facilities.

Crime exposures are primarily from employee dishonesty. Background checks should be conducted on all employees prior to hiring. Prosthetics can be very expensive. Because there are several individual clients and billings are normally sent to insurance companies or foundations, false billings and statements are possible. Ordering and billing must be handled by two different employees.

Inland marine exposures are from accounts receivable, bailees customers for work on existing prostheses, goods in transit to clients, and valuable papers and records for clients' specifications and suppliers' information.

All items belonging to clients must be properly labeled so they can be returned to their rightful owners. Records should be duplicated and stored in an off-site facility.

Commercial auto exposure may be limited to hired and non-owned for employees running errands. If the practice supplies vehicles for technicians to travel to off-premises locations, all drivers must have a valid driver's license with acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and records of the maintenance kept at a central location.

Prosthetists Insurance Georgia - The Bottom Line

To protect your business, employees and the people you make and fit libs for, having the right prosthetists insurance Georgia coverage is imperative. To see what exact types of business insurance you need, how much coverage you should invest in - and the cost - speak to a reputable commercial insurance broker.

Georgia Economic Data & Business Insurance Information

Made In Georgia

Have a great idea for a small business and want to setup shop in Georgia? If so, before you start pursuing a commercial property and hiring employees, you want to make sure that the Peach State will support your industry to ensure your success. It's also a wise idea to familiarize yourself with the rules and regulations that the state has in place for business owners, such as the regulations and limits that pertain to commercial insurance. Below, we offer invaluable information about business development in the state of Georgia so that you venture can be as successful as possible.

Business Economic Trends In The State Of Georgia

In the past few years, there has been a definite uptick in job growth in the state of Georgia; however, in recent months, it seems that growth has become stagnant. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of May 2021, the unemployment rate in Georgia was 3.8%; 0.2% higher than the national average during the same time, which was 3.6%.

Despite stagnation in job growth and the slightly higher unemployment rate compared to the national average, more people are employed in Georgia in 2021 than were just a few years ago; in fact, in recent years, job growth has been at an all-time high.

If you're thinking about starting a business in Georgia, you're in luck; according to recent research, the state is one of the most attractive among entrepreneurs in the nation. Atlanta was voted the seventh best city in the US to launch a venture. Low living costs, business-friendly laws, and a wealth of easy to access resources have all made the Peach State a prime location for those business-minded individuals.

There are several industries that offer the potential for great success in the state, including:

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Construction
  • Film
  • Finance
  • Solar Energy
  • Technology
Commercial Insurance Regulations and Limits in GA

The Georgia Department of Insurance regulates insurance in Georgia. Like most states, Workers' compensation is also mandated in the state of Georgia; for business that employ three or more employees, you will need to carry this type of coverage.

If you use motor vehicles for business-related purposes, you'll also need to invest in commercial auto insurance coverage to protect your drivers, as well as other drivers on the road.

Additional Resources For Medical Insurance

Discover small business insurance for medical and dental professionals. Medical malpractice insurance is a type of professional liability that protects health care professionals from liability causing in bodily injury, medical expenses and property damage.


Medical And Dental Insurance

Health care providers are the most trusted individuals in our society. Ironically, they are the same ones who can do the greatest harm. They actually have the right to invade our bodies with knives and to poison us with chemicals - all in the name of health care and with the goal of relieving our symptoms and hopefully bringing about a cure.

While the actions of these professionals normally benefit us, insurance coverage must be available for the times when mistakes happen and things go wrong. These professionals and their facilities have extensive property exposures that are becoming more and more intricate and whose values are increasing exponentially.

The 'one size fits all' approach that once could have applied to insurance for health care providers and their facilities no longer applies.

Professional liability offers protection against claims of malpractice for all sums that the medical professional becomes legally obligated to pay as damages because of rendering or failing to render professional services.

Professional and medical malpractice exposures are the most expensive and difficult of all exposures for health care providers. The commercial general liability policy excludes these exposures so separate coverage is needed. Most professional liability policies are written on a claims-made basis and, as a result, tail coverage and retroactive dates are important coverage issues to be aware of when evaluating the insured’s coverage needs and comparing coverages.

The coverage provided is often called medical malpractice. For decades, many involved in the health care field and insurance companies that provide insurance coverage to providers have stated that malpractice lawsuits have created an ongoing crisis of restricting insurance availability, due to loss of insurance companies that write the coverage and significant rate increases.

As a result, state legislatures have taken the following actions to address the situation:

Imposed a dollar limitation of liability for malpractice suits.

Modified statutes of limitation to limit the number of years that a suit may be brought against a physician following a negligent act.

Modified when the statute of limitations takes effect. An example is beginning from a negligent act's occurrence rather than from its discovery.

Passed laws to modify tort law procedures and doctrines that relate to malpractice.

Because of differences in law by state it is important to know the states in which the covered health care providers are licensed and regularly practice. Some health care providers may practice in multiple states because of their particular specialty, their reputation or the demand for their services. Some hospitals may have ownership in facilities or provide services to patients that are outside of their main location state.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Physicians and Surgeons Floater, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Professional, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Georgia insurance agents & brokers and learn about Georgia small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including GA business insurance costs. Call us (470) 440-6263.

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