Pennsylvania Artist Insurance

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Types Of Small Business Insurance

  • Includes medical payments, legal representation, and defense against libel and slander accusations.
  • Bundles general liability insurance and commercial property into one affordable policy.
  • Provides financial protection if an employee has a job-related accident or illness.
  • Pays to repair or replace your business property if it's stolen, damaged, or destroyed in a fire or natural disaster.
  • Covers mistakes or alleged mistakes on your part (errors) & failures or alleged failures to perform a service (omissions).
  • Is liability and physical damage protection for vehicles, such as cars, trucks and vans, that are used for business.
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Frequently Asked Questions About Small Business Insurance


How much does general liability insurance cost?

In 2019, commercial general liability costs can vary widely based on industry. Businesses in higher risk industries pay more. Premiums are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. You can request a free quote to get an exact premium for your business. Read more...

What types of business insurance do I need?

Almost every business needs general liability and commercial property insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you'll most likely need workers compensation insurance too as most state require it. It all depends on the risks your business faces. Read more...

How does general liability insurance work?

Having general liability is the basis of any business insurance program. If you can afford only one commercial insurance policy for your small business - then you should get a commercial general liability policy, because it offers protection against a wide range of common but unexpected risks. Read more...

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance (COI) is proof of coverage. It verifies that you have insurance coverage for your small business, & contains information on types and limits of coverage, insurance company, policy number, named insured, and the effective date of the policy. Read more...
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Pennsylvania Artist Insurance Policy Information

PA Artist Insurance

Pennsylvania Artist Insurance. As an artist or craft artist, you love your job. The ability to express your creativity and bring joy to your clients - and the world - is so incredibly rewarding. But, there are a lot of aspects that are related to your business that aren't as enjoyable as the art you create; insurance, for example.

Artists use their imaginations, talents and skills to produce drawings, paintings, statues, sculptures, or other types of artwork on contract or consignment. They often work independently. Completed artwork may be displayed in homes, museums, galleries, offices, restaurants, or other establishments. In addition to their PA studios, artists may have facilities for art classes.

Many artists don't realize that there are a lot of risks that are associated with their work. By carrying the right type of business insurance coverage, you can protect your supplies, projects, staff, clients - and your personal assets - from various liabilities and the financial devastation that could come along with them.

Why is insurance so important for artists and craft artists? What type of insurance do you need? Find out more about Pennsylvania artist insurance for your art-related business below.

Pennsylvania artist insurance protects your art and/or craft business from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Is Insurance So Important For Artists and Craft Artists?

No matter what type of industry you work in, owning a business is risky. In the middle of painting a client's portrait, a light bulb could explode and rain down on her head. You and your team were hired to build and install a custom piece of furniture, and in the process, the client's property was damaged. A fire could break out in your studio, sending all of your projects and supplies up in flames. Someone could sue you, claiming that the images you took were defamatory. While visiting your gallery, someone could slip and fall on a wet floor.

These are just some of the incidents that could arise, and you would be financially liable for each one. You could be responsible for covering the cost of property damage, medical bills, legal fees, and settlements. Without the right type of Pennsylvania artist insurance coverage, the financial impact could be devastating to your business; your personal assets could be affected, too. Insurance will help to pay for the costs of covered risks, thereby helping you avoid financial devastation.

What Type Of Insurance Coverage Should Artists Carry?

The work that each PA artist does is unique, so are the commercial insurance needs. When it comes to determining what type of Pennsylvania artist insurance coverage you need, there are a variety of factors that need to be taken into consideration; the specific type of art you create, the materials and supplies you work with, whether or not you employ a staff, where your studio is located, etc...

However, there are some key forms of coverage that all PA artists should carry, including:

  • Commercial Property - This form of coverage protects the physical property that you use for your art business from certain perils, such as fire, flood, storm damage, vandalism, and theft, for example. It covers both the physical structure of your property, as well as the contents within it. For instance, if a pipe bursts and your studio, canvases, paints, brushes, wood floors, ceiling tiles, and anything else were damaged, instead of having to pay for the damages yourself, your insurance would foot the bill.
  • Commercial General Liability - This type of insurance protects you against any third-party injuries or property damage that may arise on your property or as a result of the services that you offer. If you and your crew ever damaged a client's property while installing a work of art or someone slipped on a puddle in your gallery, commercial general liability insurance would cover the cost of the associated damages and medical care. It would also assist with any legal expenses, should a third-party file a lawsuit.
  • Workers' Compensation - If you employ a staff or you rely on volunteers, you'll also need to carry workers comp insurance. Should a volunteer or employee sustain an injury or become ill as a result of conditions within the workplace, your workers' comp policy would cover the cost of any necessary medical care. If the individual is unable to work while recovering, it would also partially reimburse missed wages. Should he or she file a lawsuit, workers' comp could also help to pay legal expenses.

These are just some of the types of insurance coverage that artists and craft artists should carry. Other coverage options might include commercial auto, inland marine, and commercial umbrella insurance.

PA Artist's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure may be limited if there is no public access. If clients visit the premises, aisles must have adequate space and be free of debris. Flooring should be in good condition with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring.

Artist supplies and works in process may present an attractive nuisance to children. Sufficient exits must exist and be well marked, with backup systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls.

Products liability exposure is generally low unless the artist offers restoration services for high-valued pieces. If reproductions are made, they should be clearly marked to avoid disputes such as duplication, copyright, or trademark infringement.

Workers compensation exposures can be heavy due to lifting, falls from awkward positions, being hit by falling artwork, cuts, hernias, sprains, back strains, and foreign objects in the eye. There may be a wide variety of operations and hazards. If work is primarily done on computers, potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome and similar cumulative trauma injuries that can be addressed through ergonomically designed workstations.

Welding operations can result in burns, damage to eyes, and inhalation of toxic fumes unless protective equipment is provided and there is adequate ventilation. Installing work in museums or other establishments may require the use of ladders or scaffolds. Inhalation of toxic fumes or allergens from paints and other materials can present occupational disease exposure.

Property exposures come primarily from fire as art studios are often full of combustible materials used in the creative process. Flammable paints, etching and finishing compounds, and chemicals used for cleaning must be properly stored, separated, and controlled.

Sculptures may be carved in a traditional manner from wood, stone, or other solid material, or by welding materials together. Welding should be conducted in a separate area away from combustibles. Ceramic artists may have kilns on premises that operate at high temperatures. The kilns may burn continuously and must be monitored to prevent overheating. Operating kilns without adequate ventilation systems can build up flammable vapors and heat that can result in fire or explosion.

Some artwork is extremely fragile and may be damaged by breakage, fire, water, or smoke damage. Poor housekeeping, such as failure to collect and dispose of trash on a regular basis, could contribute significantly to a loss. Studios may be targeted by thieves. Appropriate security controls should be taken including physical barriers to prevent access to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station of the police department.

Equipment breakdown exposures are from the breakdown of heating and air-conditioning equipment. Breakdown of climate control systems may cause serious loss, especially to the artwork.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and theft, particularly if the art items have high value. Hazards increase without proper background checks. All billing and disbursements must be handled by separate individuals, inventoried and reconciled on a regular basis. Artwork may be valuable. There should be theft controls, alarms, lighting and physical barriers to prevent access to premises, both at the studio and while off premises.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the artist offers credit, computer, are for fine arts, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. Some artists exhibit their work only at their studio while others provide artwork for exhibitions or sell through a consignor. Special packaging and handling are required for highly breakable or damageable works while being transported to and from exhibitions or consignment shops. If the artist develops their work entirely on computers, the work could be lost due to mechanical breakdown or hacker activities.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired and non-owned liability. If vehicles are supplied to employees, there should be written procedures regarding personal use by employees and their families. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and records kept in a central location.

Artist & Craft Artist Insurance

To learn more and ensure that your business is properly protected with the right Pennsylvania artist insurance, speak to a reliable insurance broker about your specific needs.

Pennsylvania Economic Business Outlook & Commercial Insurance Requirements

While you might have a fantastic idea for a business, if you aren't setting up shop in the right PA location, there's a good chance that you won't see the success that you hope to achieve. With that said, it's important that you have an understanding of the economic status of the state that you are thinking about doing business in. It's also important for you to know what type of rules and regulations regarding insurance are in place in that state.

Made In Pennsylvania

If you are thinking about doing business in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, keep on reading to find out some valuable information that you can use to make the best choices for your operation.

Pennsylvania's Economy Now And Into The Future

In terms of the economy, Pennsylvania's future looks pretty bright. It boasts the sixth largest economy in the United States. It is also home to some of the largest private and public organizations in the nation, as per sales.

The job market is expected to see steady growth in Pennsylvania during the 2019 calendar year. That rate is expected to be 1 percent, which is a marked increase from previous years. This is largely due to the high pool of educated laborers that reside in the state. Currently the unemployment rate is 4.9 percent, which is on-par with the rest of the nation. It is believed that the unemployment rate will continue to drop as more jobs are added.

For business owners, there are several industries that will afford success. The food products industry, particularly related to agriculture, contributes largely to the state's economy. This is expected to continue moving forward throughout the 2019 calendar year. Other industries that are forecasted to see growth include:

  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining
  • Printing & Publishing

If you are thinking about doing business in PA, working in one of these industries will likely afford you success.

Insurance Requirements For Businesses In Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Insurance Department regulates insurance in PA. Business owners are legally required to carry workers compensation insurance. This type of coverage is a must for any business that employs any W2 part-time or full-time employees, and for employees that are either hourly or salaried. You must also carry PA commercial auto insurance if you plan on using a vehicle to conduct anything related to your business.

While commercial liability insurance is not required in Pennsylvania, it is still a wise idea to invest in. This type of coverage will protect you from the cost of any lawsuits that could potentially arise.

Additional Resources For Arts & Recreation Insurance

Read up on small business arts and recreation commercial insurance.


Arts And Recreation Insurance

Commercial insurance policies for arts, entertainment and recreation are specialized policies that protect against the unique risks that arts and recreation businesses face.

Performing artists and companies, entertainers including musical groups, theatre groups, comedians and more, writers, performers, photographers, videographers, DJ's and so many other types.

Professional liability coverage (errors and omissions) is needed in these cases to protect their financial interests due to mistakes, errors or omissions by these professionals in doing their jobs. Fr example - a bride and groom did not like the way their wedding photos turned out.

Or a wedding planner might plan a lavish wedding, but the bride's parents who are paying for it did not like the way it went. There is a lot of gray areas with arts, and you need to be protected if your clients don't agree with you that your work was what the agreed to.

If your business is involved with children, you need to review your coverages very carefully so certain important protections are not excluded. Abuse and molestation insurance might be needed to fully protect yourself in this instance.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Income with Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Commercial Articles Floater, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Bailees Customers Floater, Money and Securities, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Pennsylvania Artist insurance quote in Aliquippa, Allentown, Altoona, Ambridge, Baldwin, Beaver Falls, Bellevue, Berwick, Bethel Park, Bethlehem, Bloomsburg town, Bradford, Brentwood, Bristol, Brookhaven, Butler, Camp Hill, Canonsburg, Carbondale, Carlisle, Carnegie, Castle Shannon, Chambersburg, Chester, Coatesville, Collingdale, Columbia, Connellsville, Conshohocken, Darby, Dormont, Downingtown, Doylestown, DuBois, Dunmore, East Stroudsburg, Easton, Economy, Elizabethtown, Ellwood, Emmaus, Ephrata, Erie, Franklin Park, Gettysburg, Glenolden, Greensburg, Grove, Hanover, Harrisburg, Hatboro, Hazleton, Hermitage, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jeannette, Jefferson Hills, Johnstown, Kingston, Lancaster, Lansdale, Lansdowne, Latrobe, Lebanon, Lewistown, Lititz, Lock Haven, Lower Burrell, McKeesport, Meadville, Mechanicsburg, Middletown, Millersville, Milton, Monessen, Monroeville, Morrisville, Mount Joy, Munhall, Murrysville, Nanticoke, New Castle, New Cumberland, New Kensington, Norristown, Northampton, Oil, Old Forge, Palmyra, Perkasie, Philadelphia, Phoenixville, Pittsburgh, Pittston, Pleasant Hills, Plum, Pottstown, Pottsville, Quakertown, Reading, Ridley Park, Scranton, Shamokin, Sharon, St. Marys, State College, Sunbury, Swissvale, Tamaqua, Uniontown, Warren, Washington, Waynesboro, West Chester, West Mifflin, White Oak, Whitehall, Wilkes-Barre, Wilkinsburg, Williamsport, Wilson, Wyomissing, Yeadon, York and all other cities in PA - The Keystone State.

Also learn about Pennsylvania small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including PA business insurance costs. Call us (267) 296-1099.

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