Ohio Theater Insurance

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Ohio Theater Insurance Policy Information

OH Theater Insurance

Ohio Theater Insurance. Theater, in which live performers depict a play on a stage while members of the audience watch in specifically-designed seating, is among the world's oldest performing arts. Theaters themselves have undergone many changes over the years, of course.

Theaters are facilities built for large public gatherings: concerts, meetings, movies, plays, political events, or other types of programs. They can be open-air or covered. They generally have a stage in front and rows of seats for spectators. They may sell items at gift shops, snack bars, or restaurants. Liquor may be sold at some events.

Today's indoor theaters may be majestic buildings that feature specialized lighting and sound systems as well as valuable props, while outdoor theaters often make use of their natural surroundings to amplify the experience.

If you own and run a theater or are contemplating taking this step, your vision is one in which you provide an invaluable cultural venue for your community. Theater owners also, however, have to consider the many risks their business could be confronted with - all of which are associated with significant financial consequences.

To offer your business the best possible chance of surviving and even thriving despite a major mishap, it is essential to pay close attention to your insurance needs. What kinds of Ohio theater insurance coverage might be needed? Discover more in this short guide.

Ohio theater insurance protects your venue from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do OH Theaters Need Insurance?

As the owner of a theater, you will always strive to improve your business - but as risk and uncertainty are unavoidable, it is equally important to have a backup plan in place if something goes wrong. The right insurance coverage will help theaters to surmount the financial challenges associated with the many perils that could impact their facility.

Should your OH theater be struck by an act of nature like a wildfire, earthquake, flood, or big storm, the building and valuable equipment your business depends on could both be damaged severely.

A natural disaster will leave you unable to continue business, at least for a time, while also saddling you with massive repair bills. Theft and vandalism could deal a serious blow to any business, too.

Then, there are liability risks to think about. Should a member of the public be injured on your premises, or should an employee accidentally damage someone's vehicle while transporting lighting systems, for instance, it is not unlikely that you will face a costly lawsuit.

These scenarios do not begin to cover every challenge a theater could face, but it is apparent that many businesses would not be able to survive them if they had to cover all related costs on their own. With the right Ohio theater insurance, many of these expenses will be covered - so that your facility can recover, even when the worst happens.

What Type Of Insurance Do Ohio Theaters Need?

The modern insurance market offers businesses of any size a wide variety of different options, all of which defend you against a specific type of risk. The location of your theater, your number of employees, and the size of your operation are just some of the factors that influence the kinds of coverage you will require.

That is why it is crucial to talk through your options with a reputable commercial insurance agent who understands your field of commerce; together, you will be able to craft the insurance plan that best meets your needs. The kinds of Ohio theater insurance every venue needs, however, include:

  • Commercial Property - If a major peril - like an act of nature, theft, or vandalism - destroys or damages your business property, this type of insurance helps you cover the repair and replacement costs that follow. While commercial property insurance does cover both buildings and assets within, theaters will want to know that specialized theatrical property insurance policies, which cover assets such as sound systems and valuable props, are also available.
  • General Liability - This form of Ohio theater insurance serves to protect you from the financial fallout you would be confronted with if a third party - such as a vendor or customer - were to file a claim in which they allege that your company's activities led to bodily injury or property damage. It covers such expenses as attorney fees, medical bills, and repair costs.
  • Workers Compensation - Employees can experience a wide variety of work-related injuries, ranging from chronic back pain caused by heavy lifting to those associated with robberies. If one of your employees is injured in the workplace, this form of insurance covers their medical expenses as well as any wages lost to work interruptions.

These types of insurance will all be essential to OH theaters, but you should be aware that theaters may also be additional Ohio theater insurance needs. Talking to a commercial insurance agent is an indispensable step that will allow you to explore all the possibilities

OH Theater's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is high due to the large number of visitors on premises. Public and life safety code compliance is very important. Good housekeeping is critical to preventing trips, slips, and falls. Events are often held in darkened areas. Escalators and elevators must be inspected regularly.

Floor coverings must be in good condition. Adequate lighting, marking of exits and egress are mandatory. Steps must have handrails, be well lit, marked, and in good repair. Balconies should be regularly inspected and maintained. Parking areas should be maintained free of snow and ice.

Security at events, in the building, corridors, and owned parking areas, needs to be carefully reviewed. There should be an evacuation plan for emergencies. The theater may present an attractive nuisance hazard when not in use.

There must be adequate security to prevent unauthorized entry to vandals or would-be terrorists. Personal injury losses may occur due to alleged wrongful removal, invasion of privacy, or discrimination. Contracts with suppliers, vendors, event planners, and performers must be clear as to all responsibilities.

Liquor liability exposure can be extensive if employees are not properly trained to recognize the effects of excessive alcohol consumption. There must be procedures in place for verifying the age of guests ordering alcoholic beverages and for refusing service to underage guests.

In addition, there should be a "cut-off" time well before the end of the event to prevent visitors from consuming excessive alcohol prior to driving home.

Products liability exposure comes from any item that is sold in a gift shop, snack bar, or restaurant. Employees should be trained in the proper handling of consumables to prevent foreign objects in food, food poisoning, or the spread of other transmissible diseases.

Workers compensation exposure is high. Employees who set up, build, or transport stage settings, equipment, lighting, and scenery have exposure to cuts, puncture wounds, electrical shocks and burns, slips and falls, or back injuries, hernias, strains, or sprains from lifting or working from awkward positions.

Stage and lighting setup may involve above-ground exposures that need additional protection and precautions to avoid falling from heights or being hit by falling objects. Ongoing exposure to noise levels can result in hearing impairment.

Food preparation operations can result in cuts, scrapes, and burns. Cleaning and maintenance operations can result in lung, eye or skin irritations, and reactions.

Employees responsible for collecting, counting, possessing and depositing money may be subject to hold-ups. Security personnel may suffer injury from hold ups or unruly patrons.

Property exposure is high due to the extensive wiring for lighting, electrical, sound systems, and other electronic equipment. Event sponsors and performers will often bring their own equipment that must be fitted into the electrical system provided by the theater. It must be in good repair, adequate for the equipment used, and meet all current building standards.

Circuit breakers and/or fuses must not be able to be overridden. Stage preparations such as building, painting, or gluing scenery and displays that use wood, plastic, or flammables will contribute to the fire load. These operations must be properly controlled with flammables stored in approved containers and cabinets. If there is a snack bar or restaurant, all cooking equipment must be properly controlled.

Smoking should be prohibited throughout the facility. Loss of power for any reason could result in spoilage of food items. Theaters may be a target for vandalism. Business income and extra expense loss potential is high because backup facilities are generally not available.

Equipment breakdown exposure may be high due to the heating and air conditioning systems, electrical control panels, lighting and sound equipment used for productions. Breakdown and loss of use could result in a significant loss, both direct and under time element, if replacements parts are unavailable or repair time is lengthy.

Crime exposures are due to employee dishonesty and money and securities. Background checks should be conducted on all employees and volunteers handling money. Ticket sales and receipts recording should be separate functions. There should be reconciliation required of all ticket agents.

All ordering, billing, and reimbursement must be separate functions. If tickets are sold at the theater, a significant amount of cash may accumulate. Cash areas should be stripped on a regular basis and receipts deposited at least nightly. There must be adequate security from guards.

Inland marine exposures are from audio-visual equipment, computers, fine arts, musical instruments, theatrical property, and valuable papers and records for contracts with performers, suppliers, and vendors. Values can be high due to the wide variety of equipment for sound, lighting, scenery, and displays.

Owned equipment taken off premises can be damaged in transit or stolen. Accounts receivable coverage may be needed if tickets are sold to season subscribers on an installment basis. If the theater assumes responsibility for the equipment of entertainers or other occupants while on the premises, bailees customers coverage should be considered.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired non-owned for employees running errands. If there is transportation of guests, performers, officials, or visitors, all drivers must be properly licensed and have acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained on a regular basis with all service documented.

Ohio Theater Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the specific types of Ohio theater insurance policies you'll need and how much coverage you should carry along with costs, consult with a reputable business insurance broker.

Ohio Economic Data, Regulations & Commercial Insurance Minimum Requirements

Made In Ohio

If you're an entrepreneur, you know how important it is to research the location where you plan on setting up shop. No matter how how-quality and valuable the products and/or services your business offers may be, if you're situated in an area that isn't suitable for your operation (the wrong target demographic, a poor market, etc.), you just aren't going to achieve the success that you're hoping for.

If you're considering Ohio for your headquarters or for a new branch of your business, you definitely want to take the time to research the area before you set up shop. Below, we'll take a look at the economic trends of the Buckeye State, including employment rates and key industries that are thriving in the area. We'll also highlight some of the key forms of commercial insurance business owners need to carry when operating in Ohio.

Economic Trends for Business Owners In Ohio

The Buckeye State has seen a marked increase in job growth, which is indicated by the record low unemployment rate. According to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, as of April, 2021, the rate of unemployment was 4.3 percent; the lowest it's been in more than 18 years. In April the previous year, the rate was 4.6 percent, a difference of .03 percent in 1 year; however, and more notably, the rate has dropped .01 percent in just one month, as it was 4.4 percent in March, 2021. July, 2001 was the last time Ohio saw such a low level of unemployment, when the rate was 4.2 percent.

In January, 2010, the rate was an astounding 11.1 percent, so it's safe to say that there has been a definite decrease in the number of jobless people in the Buckeye State, which is a strong indication of the overall economy of the state.

The greater Cincinnati area is one of the best places for businesses in Ohio, where smaller cities are seeing the largest growth. Examples include Blue Ash, Beachwood, Independence, Sharonville, and Springdale. Industries that are thriving in Ohio include:

  • Advanced Energy and Environmental Technologies
  • Aerospace and Aviation
  • Automotive
  • Bioscience
  • Information Technology
  • Logistics and Distribution
  • Manufacturing
  • Oil and Gas
Business Insurance Regulations In OH

The Ohio Department of Insurance regulates insurance in Ohio. Certain policies are mandated in Ohio, meaning business owners must carry specific types of coverage. Business owners can protect themselves, the customers they serve, the vendors they work with, and their workers from various risks by investing in the right type of insurance coverage. Coverages that are required include:

Workers Compensation - Most Ohio businesses with employees are required to pay for workers comp. If your OH business has just one employee, you're probably required to carry workers' compensation insurance. In Ohio, workers' compensation insurance is provided through the state - rather than through private insurance companies.

Other forms of insurance that business owners may be required by contract or municipality. The amount of coverage business owners need to carry for each policy vary and depend on a variety of factors, including the size of the operation, the number of employees, and the nature of operations.

Additional Resources For Arts & Recreation Insurance

Read up on small business arts and recreation commercial insurance.


Arts And Recreation Insurance

Commercial insurance policies for arts, entertainment and recreation are specialized policies that protect against the unique risks that arts and recreation businesses face.

Performing artists and companies, entertainers including musical groups, theatre groups, comedians and more, writers, performers, photographers, videographers, DJ's and so many other types.

Professional liability coverage (errors and omissions) is needed in these cases to protect their financial interests due to mistakes, errors or omissions by these professionals in doing their jobs. Fr example - a bride and groom did not like the way their wedding photos turned out.

Or a wedding planner might plan a lavish wedding, but the bride's parents who are paying for it did not like the way it went. There is a lot of gray areas with arts, and you need to be protected if your clients don't agree with you that your work was what the agreed to.

If your business is involved with children, you need to review your coverages very carefully so certain important protections are not excluded. Abuse and molestation insurance might be needed to fully protect yourself in this instance.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Income with Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Commercial Articles Floater, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Bailees Customers Floater, Money and Securities, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Ohio Theater insurance quote in Adel, Algona, Altoona, Ames, Anamosa, Ankeny, Asbury, Atlantic, Bettendorf, Akron, Alliance, Ashland, Ashtabula, Athens, Austintown, Avon, Avon Lake, Barberton, Beavercreek, Berea, Boardman, Bowling Green, Broadview Heights, Brook Park, Brunswick, Canton, Centerville city, Chillicothe, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Cleveland Heights, Columbus, Cuyahoga Falls, Dayton, Delaware, Dublin, East Cleveland, Eastlake, Elyria, Euclid, Fairborn, Fairfield, Findlay, Forest Park, Gahanna, Garfield Heights, Green, Grove City, Hamilton, Hilliard, Huber Heights, Hudson, Kent, Kettering, Lakewood, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lima, Lorain, Mansfield, Maple Heights, Marion, Marysville, Mason, Massillon, Mayfield Heights, Medina, Mentor, Miamisburg, Middletown, New Philadelphia, Newark, Niles, North Canton, North Olmsted, North Ridgeville, North Royalton, Norwood, Oregon, Oxford, Painesville, Parma, Parma Heights, Perrysburg, Pickerington, Piqua, Portsmouth, Reynoldsburg, Riverside, Rocky River, Sandusky, Shaker Heights, Sidney, Solon, South Euclid, Springboro, Springfield, Steubenville, Stow, Strongsville, Sylvania, Tallmadge, Tiffin, Toledo, Trotwood, Troy, Twinsburg, Upper Arlington, Wadsworth, Warren, Westerville, Westlake, White Oak, Whitehall, Willoughby, Wooster, Xenia, Youngstown, Zanesville and all other OH cities & Ohio counties near me in The Buckeye State.

Also find Ohio insurance agents & brokers and learn about Ohio small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including OH business insurance costs. Call us (614) 407-1774.

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