Non-Residential Building Operators Insurance Alaska

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Non-Residential Building Operators Insurance Alaska Policy Information

AK Non-Residential Building Operators Insurance

Non-Residential Building Operators Insurance Alaska. As the operator of a non-resident building, you face unique challenges that require you to purchase a specific level of insurance to protect your business and its assets. Perhaps you manage high-value real estate properties, and you're responsible for those properties, their contents, and the tenants and employees operating inside them. These specialized risk are already in addition to the other issues you face each day as a business owner, including the loss of important information, property damage, and more. All business owners, including those that operate non-residential buildings, should maintain a business owner's policy at minimum and other coverages as warranted by their particular needs.

A non-residential building operators insurance Alaska business owner's policy can provide you with protection if you find yourself on the receiving end of a lawsuit.

Non-Residential building operators insurance Alaska protects your properties from lawsuits with rates as low as $67/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

What Is An Non-Residential Building Operators Insurance Business Owner's Policy?

This non-residential building operators insurance Alaska is a type of policy that rolls three insurance types into one. For non-residential building operators, this type of policy protects not only the building that you own or manage, but also the contents of the building, much like your homeowner's insurance protects your home and things inside it. The three coverage types that are combined in a BOP policy safeguard the business that you've worked steadily to make successful. These coverage types include:

  • Business liability coverage. When damage occurs to the building or things inside the building, this coverage is a godsend to the business owner. The same holds true for lawsuits that arise due to injuries on the property. For example, if a potential tenant becomes injured at your office, or if an employee damages property belonging to a tenant, then this policy kicks in to handle the financial fallout. Keep in mind that this policy does not cover any liability that you face in the rendering of any services.
  • Business liability coverage. Your business location and the tools and equipment used in your trade are covered under a business property coverage rider in a BOP policy. This includes the physical location and the equipment inside, file cabinets, computers, furnishings, and so on. This includes both owned and leased items.
  • Business income coverage. If your business experiences a covered peril, then this policy can keep you afloat while your business location receives repairs. For instance, if you have a fire that destroys the inside of your building, this policy pays for the income you lose while your business is non-operational and repairs are being done.

Other Non-Residential Building Operators Insurance Alaska Coverages

Although standard business owner's policies offer the above coverages, you can always add additional coverages to your non-residential building operators insurance Alaska policy to customize it to your business' needs. Some of the most common add-ons include:

  • Valuable papers coverage. Coverage for valuable records and papers is a type of rider policy that protects your documents from damage or loss. In your role as a non-residential building operator, you likely have change orders, service agreements, leases, and other types of important documents that are safeguarded in your care. If these documents become damaged due to a covered event, then this coverage protects you from the costs of duplicating the info, including research costs.
  • Utility outage coverage. Off-premises utility services coverage, also known as OPUS, insurance covers your business from the loss of income that may result from interruptions to your utilities when the situation is beyond your own control. For instance, if a storm passes over and downed powerlines cause outages, then any loss of service you experience as a result is covered.
  • Computer coverage. Cover media and computers with this type of rider. You likely depend on your computer system to email contractors and tenants, manage and create documents for lease and service, do accounting, and more. With computer and media insurance coverage, you can protect your expensive computer equipment fully, insuring that your business is not out a lot of money if your computer is damaged or destroyed due to a computer virus.
  • Commercial auto insurance. Protect the vehicles you use in your line of work with commercial auto insurance. This coverage is different from your personal auto policy, which does not cover personal vehicles used for business purposes.
  • Insurance for non-owned autos. If you rent, lease, or borrow a vehicle for use in the business, then you need this type of coverage. It is slightly different from a commercial auto policy, but comes with many of the same benefits.
  • Worker's compensation. Cover your employees with worker's compensation insurance. This coverage provides payments for missed work due to injury or illness related to the job as well as medical coverage.

Your business is as unique as you are, and your needs are likewise unique. Work with an independent insurance agent to determine which insurance coverage options you need and which BOP policy fits your specific business model.

Alaska Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Alaska

If you're an entrepreneur who is thinking about starting a business in Alaska, it's important to have a basic understanding of the state's overall economy before you set up shop. Regardless of how high-quality the products and services you are planning on offering may be, if the location where you open your organization doesn't offer a target market that your products and services will appeal to, chances of success are slim. Furthermore, if a workforce isn't available to support your business, you'll have a hard time staying afloat.

With that said, it's important for business-minded individuals who are thinking about starting a company in Alaska to familiarize themselves with the state's economy; it's also a good idea to have an understanding of the commercial insurance requirements.

Following is an overview of economic trends and commercial insurance policies that business owners are required to carry in The Last Frontier.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Alaska

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in Alaska was 6.1% in December of 2019. While that's significantly higher than the national unemployment rate, which was 3.4% in December, 2019, it's lower than it was one year prior, when the rate of unemployment was 6.5% in December of 2018. Though the workforce is growing slower than it is in other states, economists do predict that the rate will continue to decline in the coming years.

Despite Alaska's remoteness and cold climate, it's actually a great start to start a business. According to the Tax Foundation, Alaska is the second most tax-friendly state for business owners in the United States, as there's no individual income tax or state sales tax. Additionally, Alaska has the second highest rate of new business owners, as well as the second highest percentage of available employees (as per 2016).

As in most states, the best spots to start a business in Alaska are the state's biggest cities and the surrounding areas. This includes Anchorage, Juneau, and Fairbanks. Other key areas that are seeing a boost in business development in recent years include Homer, Sitka, Prudhoe Bay, and Ketchikan.

While there are several industries that are experiencing growth in The Last Frontier, specific sectors thrive more than others. Businesses that are related to the following industries are booming in AK:

  • Fishing, which is also one of the largest contributors to the state's economy.
  • Mining, which provides more than 4,500 jobs in Alaska.
  • Petroleum, which is responsible for 34% of jobs in the state. In fact, Prudhoe Bay is North America's largest oil field.
  • Tourism is the second largest private sector employer in the state. Each year, millions of people from around the globe travel to Alaska to marvel at the numerous natural wonders that can be found here.
Commercial Insurance Requirements In Alaska

The Alaska Division of Insurance regulates insurance in AK. Alaska mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Alaska requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

Alaska also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Commercial Property Insurance

Read up on small business commercial property insurance, including how business property insurance protects your company's building's and/or their contents from damage, destruction, theft and vandalism.


Commercial Real Estate Insurance

Rental property owners, real estate developers and property managers should keep an accurate survey of each property they own or that is in their care. This survey should include inventories of furnishings and equipment at those properties. These documents establish the extent of their insurable interest, facilitate the arrangement and placement of insurance and minimize controversy and confusion if a loss occurs.

Insurance coverage on property, general liability and professional or errors and omissions liability should be arranged and placed for every real estate and rental property risk.

The main goal of any commercial property insurance program is to protect the insured's real and business personal property. Buildings and their contents property usually represents a significant portion of its total assets, regardless of the size of the business. A commercial property program can provide the coverage you need if a loss should occur.

The ISO Commercial Property Building and Personal Property Coverage Form is an insurance industry standard that provides this needed coverage. As a result, it should always be reviewed and used as a benchmark for comparison when evaluating any commercial property coverage form.

This policy treats business personal property as more than just the contents of a building. When there is a limit of insurance on the declarations, property can be covered if inside the building or structure or within 100 feet of the building or premises and either in the open, or even in or on a vehicle.

There are many endorsements available to tailor the ISO Commercial Property Coverage Forms. Some are mandatory for all policies while others are mandatory for specific classifications and types of business. Others are optional and permit a standard form to be customized to meet a specific risk's coverage needs. Endorsements broaden, restrict, delete, modify, or add coverage.

These policies can provide the following additional coverages for small specific limits of insurance: debris removal, preservation of property, fire department service charge, pollutant clean up and removal, increased cost of construction and electronic data.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Signs, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Contractors' Equipment, Fine Arts, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, and Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Alaska insurance agents & brokers and learn about Alaska small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including AK business insurance costs. Call us (907) 531-9001.

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