Film Production Insurance Washington (Quotes, Cost & Coverage)

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Commercial General Liability Insurance

How much does commercial insurance cost?

Costs can vary widely based on industry and are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. Request a free quote to get an exact number.

What kind of business insurance do I need?

Most business owners need General Liability Insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you will need workers compensation insurance too.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance is proof of coverage. It lists the type and amount of liability coverage you have and other policy information when a third party requests it.

Is business insurance tax deductible?

Yes. you can deduct the cost of commercial insurance premiums. The IRS considers insurance a cost of doing business as long it benefits the business & serves a business purpose.

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Film Production Insurance Washington

WA Film Production Insurance

Film Production Insurance Washington. In a very competitive film art world, film producers have unique circumstances that often put them at risk of personal liability. Lots of things can go awry when you are involved in producing a film, whether it's a short film or a full-length feature. In film production, there are a variety of different perils to consider, including damage to property used while filming on location or damage to a movie studio while working there.

Motion picture production studios develop audio/visual films from an initial project proposal through final distribution. The project proposal may be initiated by customers, by purchasing screen rights to existing stories, books or plays, or conceived entirely by the studio. The filmmaker may specialize in movie production for major commercial studios, independent film production, television production, advertising and commercials, or video recording services. The five production phases are development, pre-production, production, post-production and distribution. A studio may perform all processes or use independent contractors for one or more.

The development phase turns a project idea into a viable script or screenplay. Financial backing may be solicited at this stage if the project is for a major motion picture studio. Pre-production includes planning how the film will be produced scene by scene, budgeting, and hiring staff. During production, the movie is actually created, either with traditional film or digitally. Post-production processes include editing images, building a sound track, and presenting to customers or target audiences for feedback. Once the final version is approved, a master copy is used to produce copies for distribution and release to customers.

There are liability risks for film production crews to both people and property. Savvy film production staff protect their investments with film production insurance Washington.

Film production insurance Washington protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $97/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Lawsuits in the Film Industry

Perhaps more so than many other industries, the film industry tends to be a litigious one. For instance, in 2012, author William Faulkner's family sued Sony for using a quote from one of his novels in a production. Faulkner had been credited for the quote in the film's dialogue, but this did not protect Sony from being sued.

Sylvester Stallone was sued back in 2011 for purportedly stealing "The Expendables" script from a writer.

Warner Brothers faced a lawsuit in 1996 by two people claiming that a film released by Warner Brothers made them go on a crime binge that resulted in one of them become shot and paralyzed. Later on, city officials for Batman, Turkey, sued the company after it produced "The Dark Knight", claiming an infringement on the city's naming rights.

Over the years, many film industry investors have sued producers for various alleged shortcomings when they fail to deliver box office hits as promised.

These are just some of the different scenarios that create the need for film production insurance. Without it, production professionals face significant loss potential. The exposure of films, the sheer number of people it takes to produce a film, and the physical nature of filming is a breeding ground for litigious actions. People targeted by litigants usually have no way to predict the outcome or even see the suit coming.

Unique Film Industry Insurance Needs

All films are unique, and the risks that come along with them are also unique. WA Filmmakers have different techniques and filming formats, and the locations of films differ widely. Many use expensive technical equipment, while others use just simple video cameras. All of these differences can affect the rates in WA that you will pay for film production insurance Washington.

Likewise, a full-time producer requires different coverage than those filmmakers who are working on one-time projects and who require short-term coverage. Either way, finding the right level of coverage is paramount to the long-term success of your work and your WA business. You may need several different types of film production insurance Washington coverage, including:

  • General liability coverage. This type of insurance protects you from claims arising from ideuries to people on the set and direct employees. It also covers damage to the property of others during production.
  • Protection for equipment. This type of policy protects digital recording devices and photographic equipment.
  • Professional liability coverage. This policy, known as an E&O or errors and omissions policy, provides coverage for liability and protects you from claims of character defamation, copyright infringement, privacy invasion, and libel.
  • Worker's compensation. This coverage provides income and monetary payments for workers who are injured or become ill due to job-related hazards. The level of coverage you need depends on what is required in your state. In some states, the coverage may be included in your tax bill.

If you work from home or from a WA home office, you may be able to turn to your homeowner's policy for some types of coverage, but that depends on your policy and its specific limitations. Moreover, if your business is running at a profit, then your homeowner's coverage may exclude the business from being covered under its terms.

A more reliable type of protection is WA business insurance that includes the necessary inclusions needed to protect your business completely from liability and financial loss. Discussing your needs with a trusted and seasoned agent can help you find the right solution for insuring your production, your employees, your equipment, and more with film production insurance Washington.

Comparing Film Production Insurance Costs

Working with an agent can help you find the right level of commercial coverage for your needs. Movie making is a risky business whether you produce movies as part of your profession or you are working on a one-off type of film and require minimal coverage for a limited period of time. Discussing your film production insurance Washington needs with an agent can help you find the right amount of coverage to insure that you're fully covered in the event of an unforeseen accident or illness or accidental damage to other people's property or your own.

After researching your needs, be sure to compare different film production insurance Washington policies to find the right policy for your budget, based on the coverage you need and your level of risk acceptance.

WA Film Production Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures is limited as public access is generally confined to designated waiting areas and offices. If the studio conducts production on their premises or offers tours to schools and other organizations, good housekeeping and maintenance are required to prevent injuries such as slips and falls. The floor covering must be in good condition, with steps and uneven floor surfaces prominently marked. Emergency lighting and well-marked exits are important.

Parking areas and sidewalks should be in good repair and free of ice and snow. Cast parties and launch parties may include entertainment and serving of liquor. Employees acting as bartenders should be trained to recognize the effects of alcohol.

Off-premises shooting exposures include both bodily injury and property damage. Permits must be obtained as required by law. Signed permission must be obtained when filming on private property. Contracts must be in place that outline the responsibilities of each party, including responsibility for liability exposures while shooting film. Employees may go off site to solicit and market products. There should be procedures as to how they carry out their duties, particularly policies regarding entertainment of financial backers and customers.

Professional liability exposures include copyright infringement, libel or slander, defamation of character, invasion of privacy, unauthorized use of names, ideas, music and other materials, actual or implied breach of contract related to ideas or writings, and personal injury. Written contracts and adequate documentation are keys to controlling these exposures.

Cast insurance exposures may be extensive or very limited, depending on the cast and the length of the shoot. Cast insurance provides coverage for the benefit of the production studio when a cast member cannot meet contractual obligations due to injury, disease, or death. The cost of reshooting with replacement casting can be considerable if a project is dependent on a single cast member and the shooting has taken place over a long period of time. Ensemble productions and single day shoots present the least exposure.

Workers compensation exposures are extensive and can include slips and falls on or off premises, cuts and punctures from making costumes or constructing production sets, electric shock from ungrounded equipment, falling items, work at heights, and injury from lifting of props or other equipment. Repetitive motion injuries due to computer work can be prevented with ergonomically-designed workstations.

Contracted talent used during the production phase may be considered employees and subject to workers compensation laws. Contracts must be clear regarding the applicable regulations in the state where production takes place. Additional exposures arise from doing stunts, filming projects overseas, or visiting dangerous or exotic locations.

Property exposures are primarily of an office nature unless shooting is done on premises. Construction of production sets increases the risk of fire due to the use of flammable paints and solvents. Costumes are susceptible to damage by fire, smoke and water. Smoking should be prohibited due to flammable sawdust or fabric dust in the air from cutting and assembly operations.

Expensive equipment on premises includes specialized editing equipment, sound stages, high intensity lighting, cameras, computers and sound equipment. Electrical wiring should meet current codes, be well maintained, and adequate for the occupancy. Motion picture studios may be targets for vandalism and malicious mischief. There should be after-hours security to prevent unauthorized access to the premises. Theft of equipment is a major concern. The security provided should reflect the value of the equipment and be appropriate for the area.

Business interruption exposures can be high if equipment breaks down or there is a loss. Disaster planning should be done to identify alternative facilities.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and theft, including theft of customers' property and conversion of rental equipment. Background checks, including criminal history, should be performed on all employees handling money. All billing, ordering and disbursements should be handled as separate duties. Regular reconciliation and audits are vital. Motion picture studios will have expensive equipment on premises. Physical inventories should be routinely conducted.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable, audio/visual equipment, computers, film, theatrical property, and valuable papers and records. Audio/visual equipment includes expensive cameras and microphones needed for production. Coverage for theatrical property consisting of props, sets, costumes and equipment may be needed. There may be a bailees exposure for items borrowed or rented from others. If the studio takes goods to off-site locations for filmmaking, goods in transit coverage will be needed.

Business auto exposures are usually limited to hired and non-owned for employees running errands. If the company provides vehicles for officers or salespersons, there should be a written policy on personal and permissive use of the vehicles. Service vehicles may be used to transport equipment. All drivers must have valid licenses for the vehicles being driven. All vehicles should be maintained and records kept at a central location.

Foreign exposures can be high if production moves outside the United States. Extra-territorial property and liability coverages may be needed.

Washington State Economic Outlook & Business Insurance Requirements

For anyone who is thinking about starting up a business, it is important that they choose a location that suites the industry that they wish to work in. With that said, in order to determine whether or not a location is the right choice for your business, you should have an idea about the state's economic status. You should also have an understanding of the WA state regulations related to the types of commercial insurance that you are required to carry.

Made In Washington

If you are thinking about starting up a business in the State of Washington, below, we offer some insight into the state's economic status. We also offer a glimpse at the WA insurance requirements that business owners must abide by.

State Of The Economy In Washington

Washington state may be famous for its gloomy weather, but when it comes to the economy, things here look bright. The economic outlook for Washington is healthy. It is expected that there will be more jobs added in the 2018 calendar year. There will be an increase in the productivity of labor. There will also be an increase in the state's unemployment rate during the year 2018, with a forecasted rate of 4.7 percent.

Washington is regarded as one of the top for businesses in the nation. In fact, it is listed at the 11th best state for business by Forbes. The industry that is expected to see the most growth are related to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math). Among the top industries in this state include information technology. Education, healthcare, finance, and travel and tourism also contribute largely to the awesome economy of this state.

Commercial Insurance Requirements In WA

The Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner regulates the insurance industry in WA. Businesses are legally required to carry workers' compensation insurance. This type of coverage is required for any business that employs either hourly or salaried employees, and either part-time or full-time employees. You are also required to carry commercial auto insurance if you use a vehicle to conduct any type of business in this state. That means that if you are using a car to transport goods, make deliveries, or meet with clients, you must carry business auto insurance.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in Washington, it is highly recommended. This type of insurance offers protection from lawsuits and other legal fees that may arise.

Additional Resources For Arts & Recreation Insurance

Read up on small business arts and recreation commercial insurance.


Arts And Recreation Insurance

Commercial insurance policies for arts, entertainment and recreation are specialized policies that protect against the unique risks that arts and recreation businesses face.

Performing artists and companies, entertainers including musical groups, theatre groups, comedians and more, writers, performers, photographers, videographers, DJ's and so many other types.

Professional liability coverage (errors and omissions) is needed in these cases to protect their financial interests due to mistakes, errors or omissions by these professionals in doing their jobs. Fr example - a bride and groom did not like the way their wedding photos turned out.

Or a wedding planner might plan a lavish wedding, but the bride's parents who are paying for it did not like the way it went. There is a lot of gray areas with arts, and you need to be protected if your clients don't agree with you that your work was what the agreed to.

If your business is involved with children, you need to review your coverages very carefully so certain important protections are not excluded. Abuse and molestation insurance might be needed to fully protect yourself in this instance.


Request a free Film Production Insurance Washington quote in Aberdeen, Anacortes, Arlington, Auburn, Bainbridge Island, Battle Ground, Bellevue, Bellingham, Bonney Lake, Bothell, Bremerton, Burien, Burlington, Camas, Centralia, Chehalis, Cheney, Clarkston, College Place, Covington, Des Moines, DuPont, East Wenatchee, Edgewood, Edmonds, Ellensburg, Enumclaw, Ephrata, Everett, Federal Way, Ferndale, Fife, Gig Harbor, Grandview, Hoquiam, Issaquah, Kelso, Kenmore, Kennewick, Kent, Kirkland, Lacey, Lake Forest Park, Lake Stevens, Lakewood, Liberty Lake, Longview, Lynden, Lynnwood, Maple Valley, Marysville, Mercer Island, Mill Creek, Monroe, Moses Lake, Mount Vernon, Mountlake Terrace, Mukilteo, Newcastle, Oak Harbor, Olympia, Othello, Pasco, Port Angeles, Port Orchard, Port Townsend, Poulsbo, Pullman, Puyallup, Redmond, Renton, Richland, Sammamish, SeaTac, Seattle, Sedro-Woolley, Selah, Shelton, Shoreline, Snohomish, Snoqualmie, Spokane Valley, Spokane, Sumner, Sunnyside, Tacoma, Toppenish, Tukwila, Tumwater, University Place, Vancouver, Walla Walla, Washougal, Wenatchee, West Richland, Woodinville, Yakima and all other cities in WA - The Evergreen State.


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Film Production Insurance
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