Poultry Farm Insurance

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Poultry Farm Insurance Policy Information

Poultry Farm Insurance

Poultry Farm Insurance. Poultry farm insurance is just one of the many essential facets of owning and managing your farm. You are overseeing livestock, equipment, housing, staff, and so much more. Poultry is a crucial aspect of the average American diet, with each person in the United States consuming about 220 pounds of red meat and poultry per year.

Chicken is hands down the number one protein in the country. As an essential business in the food supply chain, insurance of the many aspects of your livelihood should be one of your highest priorities.

Poultry farmers raise chickens and turkeys for eggs and meat. Some raise more exotic fowl such as ducks, geese, guinea, ostrich, peacocks, quail or squab. Birds can be raised in confinement or free-range, although free-range fowl are kept indoors during inclement weather and at night due to predators.

Beaks may be trimmed to prevent the birds from aggression or feathering pecking and eating. Feed is provided along with vaccinations to keep the stock healthy until they reach market weight. The farmer either drives the birds or eggs to the processing plant or hires a carrier to transport them.

Many operations raise their own grain to turn into feed. Poultry farms are subject to regulation by the USDA, FDA, and EPA. While the use of antibiotics for poultry has been approved by the FDA since 1951, the practice has generated increased controversy due to concerns about human antibiotic resistance.

All businesses contain inherent risks, and you should protect your business and revenue with an investment into the correct type of insurance that you need. Insurance will be there to make sure your business thrives, regardless of extraordinary circumstances out of your control. Having control over your poultry farm insurance policy coverages is of the utmost importance.

Poultry farm insurance protects your growing facilities, laying houses, egg gathering facilities & service buildings from lawsuits with rates as low as $67/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked poultry farm insurance questions:


How Much Does Poultry Farm Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard Poultry Farm Insurance policy for small farms and agribusinesss ranges from $67 to $89 per month based on location, number of birds and poultry houses and more.

What's The Difference Between Farm Insurance & Homeowner's Policies?

Chicken Farm

It is essential to distinguish between personal property and farm property as homeowners' policies do not cover farm equipment. Your agent may be able to provide both, but insuring anything in the revenue pathway from your farm should be done with a separate poultry farm insurance policy.

Itemizing farm equipment such as ladders, hoses, and power washers will mitigate any risks associated with damage or loss.

Ensuring that your business assets are covered for the wide variety of incidents that can happen on any poultry farm is critical to your success. Knowing you have a backup plan in these events can ensure your peace of mind.

It is vital to go through each step of your policy with your agent to identify gaps in coverage that can impact your business and its revenues.

We recommend listing several things that you have been exposed to over the run of your farming experience and asking if those events will be covered under the policy you currently have. For example:

  1. What if a lightning strike causes a fire and renders a building useless?
  2. Will the loss of animals be covered?
  3. Will the structure be covered?
  4. What about the loss of revenue associated with the lightning strike?
  5. What if a roof collapses due to heavy ice or snow?
  6. What if the compressor on your cooling equipment breaks down during a heatwave?

Come up with pointed scenarios and make sure there are no gaps in the coverage you need to keep your family business running the way you foresee, even when unforeseeable events may occur.

What Type Of Poultry Farm Insurance Do I Need?

Although a poultry farm insurance policy is a good place to start when considering protecting your farm, there are other optional farm and ranch insurance coverage types to consider. Your commercial farm insurance agent might recommend some or all of the following:

Workman's Compensation and Employee Liability Insurance

If you employ staff to help with your poultry farm, you must carry workman's comp in virtually every state. If any of your team is injured while on the job, workers comp kicks an and pays for medical care, loss of income and even death.

General Liability Insurance

This will protect you from third party incidents of bodily injury or property damage which can happen on or off your farm./p>

Equipment Breakdown

Protecting the equipment that allows you to stream revenue is critical. What happens your equipment stops working the way you need it to? Will you be covered if a fire destroys your barn or even your precious livestock?

Equipment breakdown coverage can help protect your ventilation and other poultry house equipment. Asking your broker when your policy begins coverage and how you can protect these aspects of your livelihood will be crucial in any of these events.

Theft Coverage

Yes, people steal chickens! Your policy should take into account what would happen in the theft of any of your property, including your animals.

Loss Of Income

Part of a commercial farm property insurance, this coverage can protect you from the type of event where you incur a proportionate loss of revenue to your business. Everything from weather events, fire, or machinery breakdowns can inhibit the revenue stream you rely on.

These are just a few if the poultry farm insurance coverages you should consider. You might need more or less based on your farming operations.

Poultry Farmer's Risks & Exposures

Integrated Poultry Farm

Premises liability exposure is moderate. FDA inspectors and veterinarians regularly visit the premises. Poultry farms may be visited by school-age children and other tour groups who can trip and fall on uneven walking surfaces or housekeeping hazards.

Visitors may be allowed to handle chicks, resulting in pecks or scratches. Visitors should be accompanied by an employee. Restricted areas should be secured to keep visitors from straying into operational areas.

All exits should be adequately marked. The poultry farm may present an attractive nuisance to trespassers. There must be adequate security to prevent unauthorized entry.

Products liability exposures are moderate due to the potential for contamination of meat products and eggs such as bird flu, E. coli, and salmonella and passage of that disease to consumers. Effective procedures are required to ensure that vaccinations are up to date on each bird, that birds with communicable diseases are not sent to a processor, and that the rodent population is controlled.

Controls must be in place to prevent contamination from exposure to chemicals such as insecticides and pesticides. There should be an effective working recall program that can be activated immediately.

Environmental impairment liability exposures are high due to the potential for air, land, or water pollution from the use of agricultural chemicals and pesticides application, storage and disposal of fowl waste, and motor vehicle fuel storage tanks. Larger operations or those raising poultry in confined settings may have on-site waste collection pits that produce toxins hazardous to humans and other animals.

Drugs, needles, and syringes used to administer medications are considered biohazardous waste and must be disposed of properly. Shipments of waste may result in off-premises pollution in the event of an accident or spill. If there are underground storage tanks, a UST policy will be required.

Workers compensation exposures are high due to the use of equipment and interaction with poultry that can peck or scratch an employee. Roosters and toms can be territorial. Workers can cut themselves or sever fingers during the debeaking process. Training, supervision, and communication are important in maintaining a safe work environment.

Slips, trips, falls, back injuries from lifting, foreign objects in the eye, and muscle strains are common. Exposure to farm chemicals and organic dust can lead to respiratory issues. Workers can suffocate in confined spaces such as grain bins, tanks, waste containment areas or silos.

Respiratory equipment and safety lines should be used. Injuries can result from loading and unloading poultry from vehicles. Employees can pick up communicable diseases from working with poultry.

Property exposures are high due to numerous ignition sources, such as heaters, cooling equipment, and electrical fixtures combined with combustible materials such as animal feed and bedding, oils, and motor vehicle fuels. The egg producing farms will have higher exposures because of the egg assembly lines.

All machinery and equipment must be inspected and maintained regularly to avoid wear and tear or overheating losses. Wiring must be up to date and of sufficient capacity. All machinery should be grounded to prevent static buildup and discharge. Electrical fixtures should be dust and moisture proof.

All farms will keep their hatcheries, young chicken and mature chicken barns separate to control disease. If poultry are caged at all times, significant waste occurs that must be removed. This waste can spontaneously combust if not properly stored and ventilated. Lightning may strike buildings unprotected by rods and GFIs, and severe winds and tornados may destroy property in certain geographical areas.

Poultry farms are in rural areas where fire response time may be slow and a water supply to douse a fire may be undependable. Auxiliary fire-fighting procedures should be in place, including evacuation of the birds. Fire extinguishers should be well distributed. Automatic fire detection and suppression systems should be considered, especially in larger operations. Smoking should be prohibited.

Poultry farms may be a target for vandalism or demonstrations. Adequate security should be provided. Business income and extra expense may be high after a loss due to the unavailability of backup facilities.

Equipment breakdown exposure can be high due to the lighting and heating equipment used for maintaining an optimal environment for hatching eggs. All machinery and equipment must be regularly inspected and maintained.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and theft but are relatively minor if there are no retail or delivery operations. Pre-employment checks should be conducted for employees. Inventory controls should be in place. Money-handling responsibilities should be separated, with no employee handling both receivables and disbursements.

A money and securities exposure exists if there are retail operations on premises or if products are delivered to customers. Some prescription medications for poultry may be targeted by thieves.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the farm bills customers, computers, goods in transit, livestock, mobile equipment, and valuable papers and records for pedigree information, records needed to substantiate FDA requirements, product information that may be needed in case of a recall, and veterinary information.

Goods in transit coverage will be needed if birds are transported. Poultry carriers are bulky and may overturn. Mobile equipment is common for cleaning poultry houses and moving the birds. A wide range of farm machinery may be needed if the operation grows its own feed grain.

Commercial auto exposures may be limited to hired and non-owned if carriers or processors transport the poultry to processing centers. If the farm transports its own birds, the exposure increases. Drivers must be trained in handling the sway of poultry trailers. Drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. All vehicles must be well maintained with records kept.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 0251 Broiler, Fryer and Roaster Chickens, 0252 Chicken Eggs, 0253 Turkeys and Turkey Eggs, 0254 Poultry Hatcheries, 0259 Poultry and Eggs, Not Elsewhere Classified
  • NAICS CODE: 112310 Chicken Egg Production, 112320 Broilers and Other Meat Type Chicken Production, 112330 Turkey Production, 112340 Poultry Hatcheries, 112390 Other Poultry Production
  • Suggested ISO Farm and Commercial General Liability Code(s): 02518, 02519, 02618, 02619, 02718, 02719, 02818, 02819
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 0034

0251: Broiler, Fryer and Roaster Chickens

Division A: Agriculture, Forestry, And Fishing | Major Group 02: Agriculture Production Livestock And Animal Specialties | Industry Group 025: Poultry And Eggs

0251 Broiler, Fryer and Roaster Chickens: Establishments primarily engaged in the production of chickens for slaughter, including those grown under contract.

  • Broiler chickens, raising of
  • Chicken farms or ranches, raising for slaughter
  • Cornish hen farms
  • Frying chickens, raising of
  • Roasting chickens, raising of

0252: Chicken Eggs

Division A: Agriculture, Forestry, And Fishing | Major Group 02: Agriculture Production Livestock And Animal Specialties | Industry Group 025: Poultry And Eggs

0252 Chicken Eggs: Establishments primarily engaged in the production of chicken eggs, including table eggs and hatching eggs, and in the sale of cull hens.

  • Chicken egg farms
  • Started pullet farms

0253: Turkeys and Turkey Eggs

Division A: Agriculture, Forestry, And Fishing | Major Group 02: Agriculture Production Livestock And Animal Specialties | Industry Group 025: Poultry And Eggs

0253 Turkeys and Turkey Eggs: Establishments primarily engaged in the production of turkeys and turkey eggs.

  • Turkey egg farms and ranches
  • Turkey farms and ranches

0254: Poultry Hatcheries

Division A: Agriculture, Forestry, And Fishing | Major Group 02: Agriculture Production Livestock And Animal Specialties | Industry Group 025: Poultry And Eggs

0254 Poultry Hatcheries: Establishments primarily engaged in operating poultry hatcheries on their own account or on a contract or fee basis.

  • Chicken hatcheries
  • Egg hatcheries, poultry
  • Poultry hatcheries

0259: Poultry and Eggs, Not Elsewhere Classified

Division A: Agriculture, Forestry, And Fishing | Major Group 02: Agriculture Production Livestock And Animal Specialties | Industry Group 025: Poultry And Eggs

0259 Poultry and Eggs, Not Elsewhere Classified: Establishments primarily engaged in the production of poultry and eggs, not elsewhere classified. This industry also includes establishments deriving 50 percent or more of their total value of sales of agricultural products from poultry and eggs (Industry Group 025), but less than 50 percent from products of any single industry.

  • Duck farms
  • Egg farms, poultry: except chicken and turkey
  • Geese farms
  • Pheasant farms
  • Pigeon farms
  • Quail farms
  • Squab farms

Poultry Farm Insurance - The Bottom Line

No matter if you manage a small bird farm or a large corporate entity, the operation should be insured to reduce the entire operation's risks.

Your poultry farm insurance policy should reflect the type of coverage necessary to maintain a successful business to keep revenue flowing in case of any emergency.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Agribusiness Insurance

Learn about small business agribusiness insurance - a type of commercial insurance protects farmers against loss of, or damage to crops or livestock.


Agribusiness Insurance

Farming is, and has always been a tough business. There are many uncontrollable factors for farmers to deal with - like the weather, vermin, or other natural catastrophes. Any of these can destroy cash crops, such as corn, cotton, soybeans, and wheat, and put the farmer in a very bad financial situation.

Insurance for agribusiness falls into three general categories:

The first is property insurance on the buildings and the usually substantial amount of business personal property made up of machinery, livestock, equipment and other stock.

The second is liability for both premises and products.

The last is protection for worker injuries. Commercial auto insurance should be written if the operation owns vehicles and especially if it transports its own products.

There are a wide variety of agribusiness insurance options that are available to farmers. These policies allow them to to receive compensation in the event of a poor growing season, dropping prices, cattle disease or catastrophic natural event.

Loss of crops or livestock can financially ruin an agribusiness operation. The crop insurance agrees to indemnify the farmer, rancher or grower against losses which occur during the crop year. Losses have to be caused by things which are unavoidable or beyond the farmer's control - like a drought, freeze and/or disease.

Some policies offer coverage due to adverse weather events such as the inability to plant due to excess moisture or losses due to the quality of the crop.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Buildings, Business Personal Property, Crop Insurance, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Goods in Transit, Mobile Equipment, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Environmental Impairment, Umbrella, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Business Income and Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Farm Owners, Flood, Computer Fraud, Employee Dishonesty, Forgery, Money and Securities, Cyber Liability, Employee Benefits, Employment-related Practices Liability, Product Recall, Underground Storage Tank, Stop Gap Liability and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) (Drones).


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