Dairy Farm Insurance Utah

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Dairy Farm Insurance Utah Policy Information

UT Dairy Farm Insurance

Dairy Farm Insurance Utah. Whether you operate mid-sized dairy farm that produces milk and other dairy-related products for your local UT town, or you own a massive amount of cattle that produces milk-based products that are shipped throughout the country, you're going to need to make sure that you have the right type of protection. Being a dairy farmer is extremely rewarding; however, several liabilities are associated with this line of work.

Of course, making sure that you and your staff stay abreast of the latest safety standards and protocols and making sure that you upkeep your equipment are vital ways to ensure safety. But what happens if the unexpected occurs? A piece of equipment malfunctions, a third-party is injured, or someone alleges that your herd is being treated cruelly? With the right type of insurance coverage, you can protect yourself, your staff, your heard, third-parties, and your entire business from serious repercussions.

UT dairy farmers produce milk and milk products such as butter, buttermilk, cheese, and yogurt, from cows or goats. Milking is done two to three times each day, with some modern dairies performing milking on a 24-hour basis. After sanitizing the animal, a device is attached to the udder to pump milk into a holding tank. There, the milk is refrigerated until processed by the dairy or transported to an aggregator for combining with other milk before being processed.

Since milk naturally contains bacteria that will cause it to spoil quickly even if refrigerated, it is put through a heating process called pasteurization to destroy the bacteria. If the dairy sells the milk directly to retailers, homogenization also occurs to keep the cream from rising to the top. Additional processes are used to manufacture other milk products.

Many operations raise their own grain to turn into feed for their livestock. To keep milk production high, dairy animals must be bred regularly, which also maintains a steady supply of replacements for milking. Dairies are subject to regulation by the USDA, FDA, and EPA.

Why is insurance so important for dairy farmers? What type of dairy farm insurance Utah coverage should you invest in? Below, we'll answer these questions any more so that you can make the best decisions for your specific needs.

Dairy farm insurance Utah protects your cows producing raw milk for bulk sale, hay, pollution liability and more - with rates as low as $77/mo. Get a fast quote and protect your income now.

Why Do Dairy Farmers Need Insurance?

Imagine, if you will, any of the following scenarios:

  • A fire breaks out on your farm and your herd and barns are damaged.
  • A massive storm rolls through and several trees topple over, seriously damaging your farm.
  • A member of your heard breaks through the fencing on your farm and ends up roaming the roadway and causes an accident.
  • A vendor is dropping off supplies on your farm and slips on a puddle.
  • Someone files a lawsuit against you, alleging that the products you produce caused a serious case of food poisoning.
  • Someone vandalizes your property and steals a few pieces of expensive equipment.

All of these situations can result in serious financial losses that may be responsible for. If you don't have the right type of dairy farm insurance Utah coverage, you could end up having to cover the costs that are associated with any of these travesties out of your own pocket. Unless you have hundreds of thousands of dollars socked away - and even if you do have a substantial amount of money saved - trying to cover these types of expenses on your own could put you in financial ruin. There's a serious chance that you could go bankrupt; and even worse, it's possible that you could lose your entire business.

In order to off-set the financial devastation that can arise in any of the aforementioned situations - or any other incident that could impact your business - having the right type of insurance coverage is an absolute must. Instead of having to pay for lost, stolen, or damaged equipment and property, or having to cover the cost of lawsuits and medical bills (and the myriad of other costs that you could be responsible for), your insurance coverage would assist you with the financial burden. In other words, insurance can help to protect you from serious financial trouble. Ultimately, it could save your business.

What Type Of Insurance Coverage Should Diary Farmers Carry?

There are several types of insurance policies dairy farmers should consider carrying. In some cases, these coverages are required by law; however, it's also a wise idea to invest in policies that aren't compulsory. What type of insurance should you purchase? Here's a look at some policies that are absolutely essential for UT dairy farmers:

  • Commercial liability coverage
  • Commercial property insurance
  • Commercial vehicle liability coverage
  • Livestock insurance coverage
  • Pollution liability coverage
  • Product liability insurance
  • Workers' compensation insurance

These are just some of the types of dairy farm insurance Utah policies that can benefit dairy farmers. The amount of insurance coverage that you need for each policy will depend on a variety of factors, such as the size of your heard and farm, the type of equipment you own, and how many people you employ, just to name a few. The cost of coverage for each type of policy will also vary depending on the unique needs of your farm.

UT Dairy Farmer's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures is moderate. FDA inspectors and veterinarians regularly visit the premises. Dairy farms are often visited by school-age children and other tour groups who can trip and fall on uneven walking surfaces or housekeeping hazards. Visitors should be accompanied by an employee. Restricted areas should be secured to keep visitors from straying into operational areas. Fences should be well maintained to prevent animals from straying, especially onto roads.

Retail operations should have excellent housekeeping to prevent slips and falls. All exits should be adequately marked. The dairy may present an attractive nuisance to trespassers. There must be adequate security to prevent unauthorized entry.

Products liability exposures are moderate due to the potential for contamination, spoilage, and foreign objects in the milk. Raw milk should be tested before delivery to milk processors. Effective procedures are required to ensure sanitary working and processing conditions. The workplace must meet all FDA specifications and be arranged so that foreign substances do not enter processing areas. A testing laboratory should be on-site to perform quality control.

Tanker cleaning must be done on a continuous basis and fully documented. Controls must be in place to prevent contamination from exposure to chemicals such as insecticides and pesticides. Stock dating and rotation are crucial factors. An effective working recall program that can be activated immediately must be established.

Environmental impairment liability exposures are moderate due to the potential for air, land, or water pollution from the application of chemicals and pesticides, disposal of animal waste and the existence of motor vehicle fuel storage tanks. Larger operations or those raising animals in confined settings may have on-site manure lagoons that produce toxins including ammonia, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and methane that are hazardous to humans and animals.

Drugs, needles, and syringes used to administer medications or to artificially inseminate animals are considered biohazardous waste and must be disposed of properly. Shipments of manure may result in off-premises pollution in the event of an accident or spill. If there are underground storage tanks, a UST policy will be required.

Workers compensation exposures are high due to the use of equipment and interaction with unpredictable dairy animals that can bite, kick, suffocate, or trample an employee. Training, supervision, and communication is important in maintaining a safe work environment. Slips, trips, falls, burns from heating equipment, back injuries from lifting, foreign objects in the eye, hearing impairment from noise, and muscle strains are common.

Exposure to farm chemicals, noxious odors from animal waste, and organic dust can lead to respiratory issues. Workers can suffocate in confined spaces such as grain bins, tanks, silos, and pits. Adequate safety equipment should be required for employees in grain bins and animal handling areas. Anhydrous ammonia refrigerants are poisonous when leaked into confined spaces such as coolers. Controls must be in place to maintain, check, and prevent such injury. Injuries can result from loading and unloading animals from vehicles. Employees can pick up diseases from working with animals.

Property exposures are high because of numerous ignition sources, such as heaters, cooling equipment, electrical fixtures and milking equipment combined with combustible materials such as hay, straw, animal feed and bedding, oils, and motor vehicle fuels. All machinery and equipment must be inspected and maintained regularly to avoid wear and tear or overheating losses. Wiring must be up to date and of sufficient capacity. All machinery should be grounded to prevent static buildup and discharge.

Electrical fixtures should be dust and moisture proof. Due to its combustibility, an ammonia detection system should be in place if ammonia is used as a refrigerant. Dairy products must meet extremely high sterility requirements, with most processes taking place in closed containers to prevent contamination. This sterile environment helps control most fire exposures. However, if a small fire does begin, a total loss could occur as state, local, or federal regulations may require the disposal of major portions of stock and raw materials that have been exposed to fire, smoke, heat, or water.

Spoilage losses can be severe if the refrigeration and cooling equipment malfunctions or loses power. Controls, such as alarms, must be in place to warn if power is out or if temperature rises in coolers and freezers. Emergency backup systems, such as emergency generators, should provide power if an outage or shutdown occurs. Lightning may strike buildings unprotected by rods and Ground Fault Interrupter (GFIs), and severe winds and tornados may destroy property in certain geographical areas. Dairy farms are in rural areas where fire response time may be slow and a water supply to douse a fire may be undependable.

Auxiliary fire-fighting procedures should be in place, including evacuation of the animals. Fire extinguishers should be well distributed. Automatic fire detection and suppression systems should be considered, especially in larger operations. Smoking should be prohibited. Business income and extra expense may be high after a loss due to the unavailability of backup facilities.

Equipment breakdown exposure is high due to the automated milking and processing equipment which can malfunction or break down.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and theft but are relatively minor if there are no retail or delivery operations. Pre-employment checks should be conducted for employees. Inventory controls should be in place. Money-handling responsibilities should be separated, with no employee handling both receivables and disbursements. A money and securities exposure exists if there are retail operations on premises or if products are delivered to customers. While milking equipment is not attractive to thieves, some prescription medications for animals may be targeted.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the dairy bills customers, computers (which may include controls for automated milking equipment), livestock, mobile equipment, and valuable papers and records. Mobile equipment is common for cleaning barns and moving the animals. A wide range of farm machinery may be needed if the operation grows its own feed grain. Valuable papers and records include pedigree information, records needed to substantiate FDA Grade A requirements, product information that may be needed in case of a recall, and veterinary records.

High-value animals may be candidates for animal mortality insurance. Goods in transit coverage will be needed if bulk milk or finished products are transported. Bulk milk must be transported in tankers used only for milk. Each must be sanitized after each use. Bulk milk tankers are bulky, and overturns usually result in a total loss. Refrigerated trucks used to transport dairy products can malfunction, resulting in spoilage.

Business automobile exposures may be limited to hired and non-owned if milk processors transport the milk. If the dairy delivers its own product or transports animals, the exposure increases. Drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Liquids may sway while being transported which will affect handling of the vehicle. Drivers must be trained in handling the sway of cattle trailers. All vehicles must be well maintained with records kept.

Dairy Farm Insurance Utah Coverage

To find out what type of insurance coverage you should invest in, how much coverage you should carry, and how much your coverage will cost, speak to a reputable insurance broker. You might also be able to find umbrella policies that will lump several types of coverage together.

For the safety of yourself, your employees, and your livelihood, having the right UT Dairy Farmer insurance coverage is absolutely essential.

Utah Economic Data, Regulations & Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Utah

If you are an entrepreneur who has your sights setting on opening up a business in the state of Utah or you are thinking about expanding your operation to the Beehive State, making sure that it offers a climate and demographic that will support your industry is vital to your overall success. If the state does not offer a positive business climate or demographics that will benefit from the products and/or services that you offer, there's a good chance your business could fail.

By assessing the employment rate as well as the key industries that are thriving in UT you will be able to determine if it is an ideal location for your enterprise. Additionally, knowing what type of commercial insurance coverage you'll need is important so you can make sure you are properly protected and set yourself up for success.

Economic Trends For Utah Business Owners

As of January, 2019, Utah has one of the strongest labor markets in the country. At this time, the unemployment rate was registered at 3.1 percent, which is lower than the national average of 3.6 percent. The unemployment rate to continue holding steady or drop even further, as more job opportunities are projected to become available.

Both large urban and small urban areas offer good opportunities for business owners. In a report that was issued at the end of 2018, six Utah cities were included on the list of top cities to start a business in the United States. These cities include:

  • Bountiful
  • Clearfield
  • Midvale
  • Ogden
  • St George

Salt Lake City, the state's capital, and the surrounding areas also offer opportunities for business owners who are interested in starting a business in Utah.

The top industries that are poised to see the most growth in Utah over the course of the next few years include:

  • Aerospace and defense
  • Agriculture
  • Finance
  • Information technology
  • Leisure and hospitality
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining
  • Petroleum production

If you are considering going into business in UT, having an operation in any of these industries will likely afford you success.

Commercial Insurance Regulations In Utah

The Utah Insurance Department regulates commercial insurance in the Beehive State. Business owners are required to invest in commercial insurance coverage, as it safeguards their interests, as well as the interest of all that are involved in the company, including employees, clients, and vendors.

Just like any other state in the country, there are specific types of commercial insurance coverage that business owners need to carry in UT. These coverages include:

  • Workers Compensation Insurance: Pays for medical expenses and lost wages should an employee sustain a work-related injury or illness.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: For vehicles over a certain weight, covers any damages if a vehicle that is used for work-related purposes is involved in an accident.

Additional Resources For Agribusiness Insurance

Learn about small business agribusiness insurance - a type of commercial insurance protects farmers against loss of, or damage to crops or livestock.


Agribusiness Insurance

Farming is, and has always been a tough business. There are many uncontrollable factors for farmers to deal with - like the weather, vermin, or other natural catastrophes. Any of these can destroy cash crops, such as corn, cotton, soybeans, and wheat, and put the farmer in a very bad financial situation.

Insurance for agribusiness falls into three general categories:

The first is property insurance on the buildings and the usually substantial amount of business personal property made up of machinery, livestock, equipment and other stock.

The second is liability for both premises and products.

The last is protection for worker injuries. Commercial auto insurance should be written if the operation owns vehicles and especially if it transports its own products.

There are a wide variety of agribusiness insurance options that are available to farmers. These policies allow them to to receive compensation in the event of a poor growing season, dropping prices, cattle disease or catastrophic natural event.

Loss of crops or livestock can financially ruin an agribusiness operation. The crop insurance agrees to indemnify the farmer, rancher or grower against losses which occur during the crop year. Losses have to be caused by things which are unavoidable or beyond the farmer's control - like a drought, freeze and/or disease.

Some policies offer coverage due to adverse weather events such as the inability to plant due to excess moisture or losses due to the quality of the crop.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Buildings, Business Personal Property, Crop Insurance, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Goods in Transit, Mobile Equipment, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Environmental Impairment, Umbrella, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Business Income and Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Farm Owners, Flood, Computer Fraud, Employee Dishonesty, Forgery, Money and Securities, Cyber Liability, Employee Benefits, Employment-related Practices Liability, Product Recall, Underground Storage Tank, Stop Gap Liability and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) (Drones).


Request a free dairy farm insurance Utah quote in Alpine, American Fork, Bluffdale, Bountiful, Brigham City, Cedar City, Cedar Hills, Centerville, Clearfield, Clinton, Cottonwood Heights, Draper, Eagle Mountain, Enoch, Ephraim, Farmington, Farr West, Fruit Heights, Grantsville, Harrisville, Heber, Herriman, Highland, Holladay, Hooper, Hurricane, Hyde Park, Hyrum, Ivins, Kanab, Kaysville, Kearns, La Verkin, Layton, Lehi, Lindon, Logan, Maeser, Magna, Mapleton, Midvale, Midway, Millcreek, Moab, Morgan, Murray, Nephi, Nibley, North Logan, North Ogden, North Salt Lake, Ogden, Orem, Park City, Payson, Perry, Plain City, Pleasant Grove, Pleasant View, Price, Providence, Provo, Richfield, Riverdale, Riverton, Roosevelt, Roy, Salem, Salt Lake City, Sandy, Santa Clara, Santaquin, Saratoga Springs, Smithfield, Snyderville, South Jordan, South Ogden, South Salt Lake, South Weber, Spanish Fork, Springville, St. George, Stansbury Park, Summit Park, Sunset, Syracuse, Taylorsville, Tooele, Tremonton, Vernal, Vineyard, Washington, Washington Terrace, West Bountiful, West Haven, West Jordan, West Point, West Valley City, White City, Woods Cross and all other cities in AZ - The Beehive State.

Also learn about Utah small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including UT business insurance costs. Call us (801) 704-1677.

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