Alaska Orchard And Grove Insurance

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Alaska Orchard And Grove Insurance Policy Information

AK Orchard And Grove Insurance

Alaska Orchard And Grove Insurance. Apples, peaches, pears, plums, cherries, oranges; there are so many delightfully delicious and wonderfully nutritious goodies that grow naturally from trees.

Orchards grow fruit and nuts on trees or shrubs, including apples, berries, cherries, pears, peaches, peanuts, pecans, and walnuts. Orchards for citrus fruits such as grapefruit, lemons, limes, and oranges are often called groves.

Some orchards have retail operations where customers visit the premises, including "You Pick It" operations. Some process their goods into cider, jellies, or jams to sell to customers. Others take their products to local farmers' markets.

At harvest time, the farmer either drives the produce to processing plants or hires a carrier to transport them.

Orchards and groves depend on natural substances such as compost and manure to be successful, plus several chemical applications such as fertilizers, fungicides, herbicides, and pesticides. Mowers, pickers, tillers, tractors, and other types of farming machinery are required to support production.

If you're lucky enough to own an orchard or grove - whether it only features a single type of tree or it's expansive and features a variety of species - you want to share the yummy and nutritious bounty that your trees produce.

That's why you've decided to open up your farm to the public and invite them in to pick their own fresh fruits. You also employ a team to help you manage your trees and your land and pick crops to be distributed.

While you always go the extra mile to make sure that your orchard or grove functions properly and that everyone who uses it or receives products from it is satisfied, you just never know when something unexpected could go wrong.

To protect yourself from the risks that are associated with owning and operating an orchard or grove, making sure that you are properly protected with the right type of insurance coverage is an absolute must.

Why is Alaska orchard and grove insurance so important? What kind of policies should you carry? Read on to find out the answers to these questions and more.

Alaska orchard and grove insurance protects your operations from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do AK Orchards And Groves Need Insurance?

There's so much that goes into owning, operating, and maintaining an orchard or grove. The land and your trees have to be properly maintained and cared for, which means that a lot of tools and equipment need to be used.

You may employ a crew to assist you with the operational functions. If you offer “U-Pick” services, you are also responsible for anything that happens to the public while they are on your property.

In other words, as the owner and operator of an AK orchard or grove, you have a lot of responsibilities on your shoulders, and should something go wrong, you will be held legally liable.

Someone could trip and fall while picking fruit from your grove. A staff member could fall off a ladder and sustain an injury while picking crops. Your property could be damaged as a result of a severe weather event. These are just a few of the unexpected things that could happen, and if they do, you could be looking at serious financial losses.

If you have the right Alaska orchard and grove insurance , however, instead of having to pay for the related expenses out of your own pocket, your insurance company will cover the costs for you. In short: insurance can help you avoid monetary devastation.

What Type Of Insurance Do Alaska Orchards And Groves Need?

There are several types of insurance policies that the owners and operators of AK orchards and groves should carry. Some of policies are mandatory, while others are voluntary.

In order to find out exactly what kind of Alaska orchard and grove insurance coverage you should carry to properly protect yourself, your customers, and your staff, speaking with an experienced commercial insurance agent is highly recommended.

With that said, however, here's a look at a few of the policies that you'll want to invest in:

  • Commercial Property - This coverage protects your orchard or grove, including the fields and the buildings on the property, from acts of nature, theft, or vandalism. If someone were to steal a piece of equipment that you use to harvest your crops, commercial property insurance would help to pay for the replacement costs.
  • General Liability - This Alaska orchard and grove insurance policy will protect you from third-party liability claims. For example, if a vendor were to trip and fall while picking up crops from your property that need to be shipped out and they filed a lawsuit against you for physical injuries, this policy would cover the legal defense fees and any compensation that you may be required to pay.
  • Workers' Compensation - If one of your employees were to suffer a work-related injury - they fell off a ladder or were injured by a piece of equipment, for example - workers comp would pay for their medical care and reimburse them for wages that they might lose if they are unable to work while recovering from the injuries that they developed while working.

These are just a few examples of the type of Alaska orchard and grove insurance coverage that are needed. To find out what other policies you may need based on your unique operations - speak with an experienced commercial insurance broker who understands Agribusiness.

AK Orchard's And Grove's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures are generally low. The operation of farming equipment and ATVs not subject to motor vehicle registration falls under premises liability, not automobile liability, even when being used on public roads. Poor rural road conditions combined with heavy or awkward equipment and occasional operation by underage drivers can result in accidents.

Group tours, retail stores, and frequent visits by agriculture agents, chemical applicators, mechanics, and inspectors increase the exposure. Visitors may be injured due to uneven walking surfaces, inadequate housekeeping, farm machinery, and confined or closed spaces.

Some orchards include a "You Pick It" operation which requires additional protections for those picking and any young children who accompany them. Clear guidance must be provided as to where picking can take place and the areas where the pickers can venture. Barriers must be in place to prevent young children from entering dangerous areas.

Products/completed operations liability exposures are moderate due to the possibility of contaminated produce from the use of chemical applications. Any processing of fruit into ciders or other food items must be handled in a sanitary manner to prevent foreign objects from getting into containers. Only FDA approved pest control chemicals should be used.

Environmental impairment liability exposures can be high due to the potential for air, land, or water pollution from the use of agricultural chemicals and pollutants such as insecticides, fungicides, pesticides, and herbicides, fuels for machinery and motor vehicles, refrigerants, and solvents. Use and disposal of all chemicals must be documented and meet all FDA and EPA standards. If there are underground storage tanks, a UST policy will be required.

Workers compensation exposures are very high as orchards are very labor-intensive. Work may be required for long hours and in all kinds of weather conditions. Harvesting and tree pruning are done at heights, increasing the risk of falls.

Training, supervision, and communication are important in maintaining a safe work environment, especially during harvest time when significant numbers of seasonal and/or day laborers may be hired. Working around farm machinery, tools and equipment can result in a variety of injuries ranging from minor to severe.

Slips, trips, falls, back injuries from lifting, broken bones, foreign objects in the eye, hearing impairment from noise, and muscle strains are common. Use of cider presses or cooking equipment for preserves can result in crushing injuries, cuts, and burns. Exposure to farm chemicals and organic dust can lead to respiratory issues.

Workers can suffocate in confined spaces such as bins, tanks, and silos. Injuries can result from falls or from loading and unloading vehicles.

Property exposures depend on the size of the operation, type of fruits and nuts stored, and the number and types of buildings. Ignition sources include faulty electrical wiring, fuel, heaters, refrigeration units and smoking. Wiring must be up to date and well maintained.

Explosions can occur if ammonia is used as a refrigerant. Lightning may strike buildings unprotected by rods and Ground Fault Interrupters (GFIs), dryers and presses can overheat or become jammed, decaying organic material may spontaneously combust, burning operations may spread, and severe winds and tornados may destroy property in certain geographical areas.

Buildings may collapse under the weight of stored produce. Orchards are in rural areas where fire response time may be slow and a water supply to douse a fire may be undependable.

Refrigeration equipment may break down resulting in spoilage. Smoking should be prohibited. The business income exposure can be high as operations are seasonal and some equipment may be difficult to repair or replace quickly.

Crop exposures are high because unprotected plants grown in the open are susceptible to damage by animals, bacteria, drought, flooding, frost, fungi, hail, insects, lightning, snow, viruses, weeds, wildfire, wind, and winterkill.

While some of these can be mitigated by proper farming practices or chemical applications, others are considered fortuitous acts that can be covered by either crop/hail or multi-peril insurance.

Crime exposures are minimal. Most equipment and inventory are large, heavy, or difficult to remove undetected. Cash exposures are usually small unless there are retail operations. Employee dishonesty exposures are minor in family-owned and run operations. Pre-employment background checks should be done on all outside employees having access to cash, checks, safes, and equipment.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if customers are billed, computers, goods in transit, mobile equipment, and valuable papers and records for seed source information, records needed to substantiate FDA requirements, and product information that may be needed in case of a recall.

Farm equipment stored in buildings can be damaged by fire, explosion, or collapse.

Items stored in the open can be damaged by hail or winds. Goods in transit to offsite storage facilities or to customers can be damaged by overturn or collision, which may result in a total loss due to the possibility of food contamination.

Business auto exposures are moderate. Produce transport vehicles are heavy and awkward, especially on narrow rural roads. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be well maintained with documentation kept.

Alaska Orchard And Grove Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the specific types of Alaska orchard and grove insurance policies you'll need, how much coverage you should carry, and the premiums - consult with a reputable broker that is experienced in commercial insurance.

Alaska Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Alaska

If you're an entrepreneur who is thinking about starting a business in Alaska, it's important to have a basic understanding of the state's overall economy before you set up shop. Regardless of how high-quality the products and services you are planning on offering may be, if the location where you open your organization doesn't offer a target market that your products and services will appeal to, chances of success are slim. Furthermore, if a workforce isn't available to support your business, you'll have a hard time staying afloat.

With that said, it's important for business-minded individuals who are thinking about starting a company in Alaska to familiarize themselves with the state's economy; it's also a good idea to have an understanding of the commercial insurance requirements.

Following is an overview of economic trends and commercial insurance policies that business owners are required to carry in The Last Frontier.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Alaska

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in Alaska was 6.1% in December of 2019. While that's significantly higher than the national unemployment rate, which was 3.4% in December, 2019, it's lower than it was one year prior, when the rate of unemployment was 6.5% in December of 2018. Though the workforce is growing slower than it is in other states, economists do predict that the rate will continue to decline in the coming years.

Despite Alaska's remoteness and cold climate, it's actually a great start to start a business. According to the Tax Foundation, Alaska is the second most tax-friendly state for business owners in the United States, as there's no individual income tax or state sales tax. Additionally, Alaska has the second highest rate of new business owners, as well as the second highest percentage of available employees (as per 2016).

As in most states, the best spots to start a business in Alaska are the state's biggest cities and the surrounding areas. This includes Anchorage, Juneau, and Fairbanks. Other key areas that are seeing a boost in business development in recent years include Homer, Sitka, Prudhoe Bay, and Ketchikan.

While there are several industries that are experiencing growth in The Last Frontier, specific sectors thrive more than others. Businesses that are related to the following industries are booming in AK:

  • Fishing, which is also one of the largest contributors to the state's economy.
  • Mining, which provides more than 4,500 jobs in Alaska.
  • Petroleum, which is responsible for 34% of jobs in the state. In fact, Prudhoe Bay is North America's largest oil field.
  • Tourism is the second largest private sector employer in the state. Each year, millions of people from around the globe travel to Alaska to marvel at the numerous natural wonders that can be found here.
Commercial Insurance Requirements In Alaska

The Alaska Division of Insurance regulates insurance in AK. Alaska mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Alaska requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

Alaska also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Agribusiness Insurance

Learn about small business agribusiness insurance - a type of commercial insurance protects farmers against loss of, or damage to crops or livestock.


Agribusiness Insurance

Farming is, and has always been a tough business. There are many uncontrollable factors for farmers to deal with - like the weather, vermin, or other natural catastrophes. Any of these can destroy cash crops, such as corn, cotton, soybeans, and wheat, and put the farmer in a very bad financial situation.

Insurance for agribusiness falls into three general categories:

The first is property insurance on the buildings and the usually substantial amount of business personal property made up of machinery, livestock, equipment and other stock.

The second is liability for both premises and products.

The last is protection for worker injuries. Commercial auto insurance should be written if the operation owns vehicles and especially if it transports its own products.

There are a wide variety of agribusiness insurance options that are available to farmers. These policies allow them to to receive compensation in the event of a poor growing season, dropping prices, cattle disease or catastrophic natural event.

Loss of crops or livestock can financially ruin an agribusiness operation. The crop insurance agrees to indemnify the farmer, rancher or grower against losses which occur during the crop year. Losses have to be caused by things which are unavoidable or beyond the farmer's control - like a drought, freeze and/or disease.

Some policies offer coverage due to adverse weather events such as the inability to plant due to excess moisture or losses due to the quality of the crop.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Buildings, Business Personal Property, Crop Insurance, Employee Dishonesty, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Goods in Transit, Mobile Equipment, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Environmental Impairment, Umbrella, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Business Income and Extra Expense, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Farm Owners, Flood, Computer Fraud, Employee Dishonesty, Forgery, Money and Securities, Cyber Liability, Employee Benefits, Employment-related Practices Liability, Product Recall, Underground Storage Tank, Stop Gap Liability and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) (Drones).


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Also find Alaska insurance agents & brokers and learn about Alaska small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including AK business insurance costs. Call us (907) 531-9001.

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