Property Manager Insurance

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Property Manager Insurance Policy Information

Property Manager Insurance

Property Manager Insurance. Whether you manage a commercial or residential property, you are becoming increasingly apt to be sued. Property managers are often at the center of claims for various occurrences, including people becoming injured on the property.

Property managers screen tenant applications, implement leases, collect rents and security deposits, pay bills, and handle the overall property management functions, including arrangements for security, for residential and commercial building owners. Some contract out the performance of maintenance services and lawn care, while others do the actual service operations. In some cases, the manager will live on premises.

Even though you are only there to care for the building or complex on behalf of whoever owns it, if something goes awry, you can - and oftentimes, will - be looked at as the responsible party. Get the property manager insurance coverage that will keep you and your business protected.

Property manager insurance protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked property management insurance questions:

How Much Does Property Manager Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small property managers ranges from $27 to $39 per month based on location, size, payroll, sales and experience.

Why Do Property Managers Need Insurance?

Property managers are tasked with finding tenants and keeping them. They have the power to negotiate leases, sign legal documents, and enforce the provisions of leases on behalf of their employers. They can also collect rent, order repairs for the premises, conduct maintenance, ensure that guests and tenants are safe, and more.

With each of the activities listed above, there is potential liability for the property manager. property manager insurance is what protects your business against thirdy-party lawsuits and claims.

What Type Of Insurance Do Property Managers Need?

The upkeep of the managed property and any liability arising from contract performance or negligence are often the sources of liability claims against property managers. Oftentimes the question becomes which party should be held liable: the property owner or the property manager.

In general, the property manager is required to maintain commercial insurance on the properties being managed as well as liability insurance for the business - sometimes in several forms:

Commercial Property Insurance works to protect the assets of the property manager from losses caused by fire, smoke, hail, wind, and vandals. The property manager is usually responsible for maintaining this insurance on the buildings for which they are responsible, although this varies based on the individual contract the manager has with the owner of the property.

Business Interruption Insurance - sometimes called business income insurance, may be included with a commercial property insurance policy. This type of coverage provides protection for your income if you are unable to collect rental fees for a specific period of time due to a covered loss.

For example, if the rental property is damaged due to fire or a storm. This insurance also allows you to bring in income while any repairs are undertaken that allow tenants to come back to the property.

Commercial General Liability gives you coverage if you, your employees or other company representatives cause injury to a person or property. For instance, if a tenant or a guest falls on the property and becomes injured, then the policy provides you coverage for claims that may arise.

It will also cover any medical costs associated with the injury or accident and even pays for legal defense in some instances.

Errors And Omissions insurance (E&O), also known as professional liability insurance, protects you from lawsuits that occur when you are negligent in rendering professional services in your role as property manager.

Businessowners Policy (BOP) - in addition, property managers may want to opt for a business owners' policy, also known as BOP, to bundle several coverage types together. Usually, a BOP policy provides property insurance coverage, liability insurance, and insurance to protect from business income loss. Several factors are used to determine if the business needs or qualifies for a BOP policy. These include the business' size, among other factors.

Importance of Property Management Liability Coverage

Another important type of coverage to think about as a property manager is professional liability coverage. This coverage can help if you:

  • Fail to purchase the right amount of insurance, and as a result, the property owner experiences a loss
  • Negligent or wrongful evictions of tenants
  • Claims of discrimination by tenants or employees
  • Other types of claims resulting from your failure to carry out your professional duties

Professional liability coverage pays for legal defense costs and judgements as well as attorney fees, court costs and more. Errors and omissions come with some exclusions, however, which may include exclusions for malicious, criminal, or fraudulent acts; bodily injury; property damage; punitive damage; worker's comp claims; other types of claims. In addition, you must think about non-owned auto insurance. This is coverage for personal and non-personal vehicles driven in the course of doing business. It can be added to the business' auto policy and general liability coverage.

Most businesses should purchase worker's comp policies for their workers. In most states, it's required by the government. If an employee becomes injured or ill due to work-related perils, this coverage pays monetary and ongoing income lost as well as medical costs.

Property Manager's Risks & Exposures

Property Management

Premises liability exposures at the office include visits from building owners and prospective tenants. To prevent slips, trips, or falls, all areas accessible to visitors must be well maintained with floor covering in good condition. The number of exits must be sufficient, and be well marked, with backup lighting in case of power failure.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. Off-premises exposures depend on the contract between the property manager and the building owner. While building owners are usually responsible for maintaining sidewalks, parking lots, and other exterior areas, these responsibilities may be transferred to the property manager by contract. If employees of the property manager handle maintenance and cleaning of rental property, spills, marring, scratched surfaces, or the upset or dropping of breakables, may occur.

Many of these fall under the care, custody, and control exclusion, and should be covered under inland marine. Wet, slippery floors from mopping can pose a slip and fall hazard to the tenants or employees and passersby. The absence of basic controls to minimize exposure to the public such as caution signs and the use of non-slip finishes may indicate a morale hazard.

If there is lawn care, hazards include injury or damage from stones or other debris thrown by power mowers, trimmers, and other equipment. Tree trimming may result in falling branches or debris that causes bodily injury or damages power lines or other property. Property managers often employ casual labor for outside work, with minimal time or budget for training. Failure to secure the premises during cleaning and completion of the work can result in arson, burglary, and robbery by unauthorized persons.

The property manager should have specific procedures addressing lockup and key control that include a final checklist by the supervisor of a particular client. Personal injury exposures include wrongful eviction, invasion of privacy, assault to the tenants or their employees, and discrimination. There should be clear, objective guidelines regarding tenant acceptability. Failure of the property manager to run background checks and review references on employees increases the hazard and reduces available defenses.

Environmental impairment exposures are moderate if lawn care is provided. The property manager may be required to obtain a license in order to apply herbicides or pesticides. Hazards include injury to tenants from dangerous fumes, injuries to eyes from overspray, and damage to property or pets from overspray. Improper application can damage the lawn and leach into the soil or water supply.

Workers compensation exposure may be limited to that of an office if maintenance and repair work is contracted to others. Because office work is done on computers, potential injuries include eyestrain, neck strain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and similar cumulative trauma injuries that can be addressed through ergonomically designed workstations.

The exposure is higher if the firm provides the maintenance and janitorial work. Casual labor, high turnover, and minimal training are all factors affecting losses. Workers can experience lung, eye, or skin irritations and reactions to the cleaning or lawn care chemicals. Slips, falls, and back injuries and hernias from lifting are common. If power-cutting equipment is used, cuts or amputations may occur. Employees can be assaulted while working at "off hours" in empty buildings. There should be close supervision to keep employees safe.

Property exposure usually consists of an office with equipment and supply storage. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, wear, overheating of equipment, maintenance work, and cleaning chemicals and supplies. Should any of the chemicals and cleaners be flammable, proper labeling, separation, and storage is needed in approved containers and cabinets.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the firm offers credit, computers, contractors' equipment for maintenance and lawn care, and valuable papers and records for building owners' and lessors' information. Supplies and equipment kept on the customer's premises may be difficult for the property manager to safeguard and protect. If these are transported between jobs, potential causes of loss include theft, collision, and overturn.

Property managers often have a bailees exposure for customers' property in their care, custody, and control. For large-valued items like carpeting and draperies, a small spill or other damage could reduce the value of the entire item. Valuable papers and records include leases, which should be stored in fireproof cabinets. Duplicates of all data should be kept off premises for easy replication in the event of a loss.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty and money and securities. Hazards increase without proper background checks, along with monitoring procedures and securing of all records to prevent unauthorized access. All job duties, such as ordering, billing, and disbursing, should be performed by separate individuals and reconciled on a regular basis. Receipts should be issued for any cash payments received.

Bank deposits should be made on a timely basis to limit the buildup of cash on premises. Audits should be performed at least annually. Access to units must be limited to those authorized to do so, and access to master keys must be strictly controlled. Units should be rekeyed when there is a change in tenant.

Business auto exposures may be limited to hired and non-owned. Any employees who run errands for the property manager using their own vehicle must carry adequate underlying limits. If vehicles are provided to employees, there should be written procedures regarding personal use by employees and their family members. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and records kept in a central location.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 7349 Building Cleaning and Maintenance Services, Not Elsewhere Classified, 6531 Real Estate Agents & Managers, 0782 Lawn & Garden Services
  • NAICS CODE: 561730 Landscaping Services, 561720 Janitorial Services, 531311 Residential Property Managers, 531312 Nonresidential Property Managers
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 47052, 96816, 97050
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 0917, 9014, 9012, 9015

7349: Building Cleaning and Maintenance Services, Not Elsewhere Classified

Division I: Services | Major Group 73: Business Services | Industry Group 734: Services To Dwellings And Other Buildings

7349 Building Cleaning and Maintenance Services, Not Elsewhere Classified: Establishments primarily engaged in furnishing building cleaning and maintenance services, not elsewhere classified, such as window cleaning, janitorial service, floor waxing, and office cleaning. General contractors and special trade contractors primarily engaged in building repair work are classified in Division C, Construction.

  • Acoustical tile cleaning service
  • Building cleaning service, interior
  • Chimney cleaning service
  • Custodians of schools on a contract or fee basis
  • Floor waxing service
  • Housekeeping (cleaning service) on a contract or fee basis
  • Janitorial services on a contract or fee basis
  • Lighting maintenance service (bulb replacement and cleaning)
  • Maid service on a contract or fee basis
  • Maintenance, building: except repairs
  • Office cleaning service
  • Service station cleaning and degreasing service
  • Telephone booths, cleaning and maintenance of
  • Venetian blind cleaning, including work done on owners'premises
  • Window cleaning service

6531: Real Estate Agents & Managers

Division H: Finance, Insurance, And Real Estate | Major Group 65: Real Estate | Industry Group 653: Real Estate Agents And Managers

6531 Real Estate Agents & Managers: Establishments primarily engaged in renting, buying, selling, managing, and appraising real estate for others.

  • Agents, real estate
  • Appraisers, real estate
  • Brokers of manufactured homes, on site
  • Brokers, real estate
  • Buying agents, real estate
  • Cemetery management service
  • Condominium managers
  • Cooperative apartment manager
  • Escrow agents, real estate
  • Fiduciaries, real estate
  • Housing authorities, operating
  • Listing service, real estate
  • Managers, real estate
  • Multiple listing services, real estate
  • Real estate auctions
  • Rental agents for real estate
  • Selling agents for real estate
  • Time-sharing real estate: sales, leasing, and rentals

Description for 0782: Lawn and Garden Services

Division A: Agriculture, Forestry, And Fishing | Major Group 07: Agricultural Services | Industry Group 078: Landscape And Horticultural Services

0782 Lawn and Garden Services: Establishments primarily engaged in performing a variety of lawn and garden services. Establishments primarily engaged in the installation of artificial turf are classified in Construction, Industry 1799.

  • Bermuda sprigging services
  • Cemetery upkeep, independent
  • Garden maintenance
  • Garden planting
  • Lawn care
  • Lawn fertilizing services
  • Lawn mowing services
  • Lawn mulching services
  • Lawn seeding services
  • Lawn spraying services
  • Lawn sprigging services
  • Mowing highway center strips and edges
  • Seeding highway strips
  • Sod laying
  • Turf installation, except artificial

Property Manager Insurance - The Bottom Line

Work with your insurance agent to find the right level of coverage for your needs as a property manager. Property manager's insurance is a very special type of coverage. Your insurance agent can review your particular situation to help you determine which levels of protection and types of coverage are essential for your ongoing success in your field and to protect you from financial loss if the unexpected happens.

To find out exactly what type of auto service and repair shop insurance you need and how much coverage you should have, speak to a good insurance agent to go over your options.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Real Estate Insurance

Learn about small business real estate insurance coverages including liability and commercial property policies for realtors, mortgage companies and more.


Real Estate Insurance

For real estate professional liability policies, the insurance company agrees to pay amounts the insured is legally obligated to pay as damages because of a wrongful act. However, this insurance must cover the wrongful act.

The insurance company not only has the right to defend any suit brought against the insured, it also has a duty to do so. That duty, which can be very expensive, does not apply to suits brought for wrongful acts that this insurance does not cover.

What type of coverage is available for real estate agents who provide insurance advice? Any claim related to the sale or purchase of insurance is not covered. In addition, there is no coverage for any recommendations or advice regarding insurance or any failure to procure or maintain appropriate insurance.

Who is considered an insured under the Real Estate Agents and Brokers Professional Liability Policy? The named insured is an insured. The named insured is the entity or individual listed on the declarations. There can be multiple named insureds.

Any entity listed in the application as a predecessor organization is an insured. The named insured must be the entity's majority successor of interest with respect to the predecessor organization's financial assets and liabilities.

Are Real Estate Brokers Professional Liability policies written on an "occurrence" or a "claims-made" basis? Insurance is written on a claims-made basis, requiring that a claim must be reported to the insurer during the policy period or during the extended reporting period.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income with Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Professional Liability, Umbrella Liability, Hired and Non-owned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage abd Stop Gap Liability.


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