Chiropractic School Insurance

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Chiropractic School Insurance Policy Information

Chiropractic School Insurance

Chiropractic School Insurance. As a teacher of chiropractic care, your mission is to educate those who are also interested in becoming licensed professionals in the this type of medical care how to heal the bodies of their patients naturally through manual therapy.

Chiropractic schools train students in the practice of chiropractic medicine. This branch of the medical field uses a holistic approach to manage a patient's overall health by focusing on the musculoskeletal system, particularly the spine.

If this system is not working properly or is incorrectly aligned, then the health of the entire body is in jeopardy. Corrections may be done by hand or mechanically implemented. Chiropractic schools are privately funded through donations, tuition, fees, and bookstores.

You teach your students proper and proven spinal cord manipulation techniques and strategies, as well as other approaches to natural healing, such as diet, exercise, and nutritional counseling. You may also employ a staff of licensed chiropractors who also instruct the students who enroll in your school.

While your profession is extremely important, you are faced with a lot of risks. In addition to ensuring the safety and well-being of your students, you are also responsible for the safety and well-being of the faculty and staff of your school.

Furthermore, you face other risks, such as damage to your school and equipment and legal action that may be taken against you; just to name a few. While you always do your best to ensure that everything operates smoothly and properly, you never know when something can go wrong.

To protect yourself from the unexpected, investing in the right type of chiropractic school insurance is an absolute must.

Why do chiropractic schools need insurance? What kind of coverage should they carry? Read on to learn more about insurance for chiropractic schools and how to make sure you, your staff, and your students are properly protected.

Chiropractic school insurance protects your educational institution for chiropractic medicine from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked chiropractic school insurance questions:


How Much Does Chiropractic School Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for chiropractic schools ranges from $47 to $679 per month based on location, number of students, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do Chiropractic Schools Need Insurance?

Chiropractor Office

Just like any other educational institution, chiropractic schools are responsible for providing their students with an appropriate, beneficial, and high-quality education. Since students who attend your school will be providing a health care service, it is absolutely imperative that your programs are exceptional and adhere to all rules and regulations.

If you employ a faculty and staff, you are also responsible for providing those who work for your school with a safe work environment. Of course, if anything happens to your school - it's damaged by a fire or it's vandalized, for example - you'll also be responsible for the costs that are associated with repairing or replacing anything that is damaged or lost.

The costs that are associated with the things that the operators of chiropractic schools are liable for can be exorbitant. If something goes wrong and you aren't properly insured, you could be hit by serious expenses that could lead to major financial losses.

That's why having the right type of insurance is so important; if something does go wrong, instead of covering the costs yourself, your insurance company will cover them for you.

In other words, chiropractic school insurance can help to protect you from financial devastation. Plus, in order to operate legally, chiropractic schools must be properly insured.


What Type Of Insurance Do Chiropractic Schools Need?

The specific type of coverage a chiropractic school will need depends on several different factors, including where your school is located, whether or not you employ a faculty and staff, and the size of your organization; among other things.

With that said, however, there are several chiropractic school insurance policies that are usually needed. Examples of the most basic forms of insurance coverage include:

  • Commercial Property - This type of insurance protects the physical structure of your school and the contents within it from damages and losses that are caused by acts of nature, theft, and vandalism.
  • General Liability - This chiropractic school insurance coverage will pay for any third-party property damage and physical and personal injury claims that may be filed against you. It will help to cover your legal defense fees, as well as any compensation that you may be required to pay.
  • Errors And Omissions - Also known as professional liability, this type of insurance covers any negligence claims that students may file against you, including your lawyer and court fees, as well as any settlements or compensations that you might be found liable for.
  • Workers Compensation - To protect your faculty and staff from any work-related injuries or illnesses, you'll need workers comp coverage. This insurance will pay for any medical care your employees may require, as well as reimburse them for any wages that they may lose while recovering.

Those are just a few of the different types of chiropractic school insurance coverage available. For more information, speak with a reputable agent who is experienced in commercial insurance.


Chiropractic School's Risks & Exposures

Chiropractor Adjusting Patient

Premises liability exposures are high due to the number of students and patients. Furnishings and recreational equipment must be well maintained to prevent injury. Slips and falls can be prevented with good housekeeping and by maintaining floor coverings in good condition, with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring, and prompt cleanup of spills.

Sufficient exits must be provided and be well marked, with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. Procedures for all emergencies should be posted, with employees trained to use them. Evacuation drills should be practiced on a regular basis.

Security issues are becoming more critical in educational settings. All adults' references must be verified, including a criminal background check. Except for authorized police or security guards, weapons should be prohibited at the school to prevent unauthorized use. Access to the building must be limited during the hours of operation to prevent unauthorized access.

If classes are offered in the evening, guards should be available to escort students to their vehicles upon request. If there are dormitories, supervisors' references must be verified, including a criminal background check.

Immunizations should be required for each student, along with an emergency medical contact. There should be written policies regarding when a student is too ill to attend class, and when the facility will contact parents or medical emergency providers in the event of illness or an accident.

If the college has an on-premises medical clinic or police staff, professional liability coverage may be needed. Off-premises exposures can include field trips, class trips, and research and development activities.

Directors and officers exposure arise from the decisions and actions of board members. Policies and procedures should be published and consistently followed, especially as they relate to the election and removal of officers.

Personal and advertising injury exposures include allegations of discrimination, failure to prevent intimidation, humiliation, hazing or bullying by instructors or other students, false arrest or detention, invasion of privacy, slander, and libel from publishing or broadcasting activities, unauthorized or intrusive searches, and wrongful expulsion.

Exposures may also arise from professor publications, including research stealing and disputes and copyright or patent infringement. Written procedures should be in place regarding how the school will intervene when a person is accused of being engaged in any of these.

Professional liability is high. Verification of professional credentials is critical. Educational standards must be in writing and meet all criteria for state and federal licensing and accreditation. Because hands-on work is included in the coursework, all patients must be aware that a student is working on them and agree to the activity.

Because electrical impulse machines may be used, care must be taken to prevent high dosage or over usage. X-ray machines should be safeguarded to prevent overexposure. Instructors must carefully monitor and supervise the student's activities. There should be procedures to prevent inappropriate touching and sexual misconduct.

Workers compensation exposure is high due to the lifting, pulling and manipulation of patients that is part of chiropractic education. Instructors may need to intervene to prevent injury to students or patients. Safety equipment should be used to prevent exposure to radiation when performing X-rays.

Use of computer keyboards can result in repetitive motion injuries. Workstations should be ergonomically designed. Exposure to communicable disease can be high. All employees should have up-to-date immunizations.

If food is prepared on premises, kitchen workers can incur cuts, scalds, and burns. Custodians can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. Unauthorized visitors can pose a threat to employees as well as students.

Property exposure is moderate. Ignition sources include electrical wiring for equipment and machinery used in classrooms and offices, heating and air conditioning systems. Business personal property includes paper, books, wood and/or plastic furnishings that increase the fire load. All wiring should be well maintained and up to code.

Circuit breakers and fuses must be installed so that they cannot be overridden. Electrical cords must be in good condition with no fraying. Extension cord usage should be limited.

If meals are prepared on premises, all cooking equipment must be properly protected. Housekeeping must be excellent. If there are dormitories, smoking and the use of candles in rooms should be prohibited.

Hard-wired smoke detectors should be installed in all dorm rooms as well as in common areas. Colleges are often targets for vandalism and malicious mischief. There should be after-hours security to prevent unauthorized access.

Business income exposure can be high if a specialized classroom building or research facility is shut down after a loss. A disaster plan should be in place identifying temporary facilities and suppliers that could be used in the event of a loss.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities. Background checks should be performed on all employees handling money. If cash is received for tuition or from donations, receipts should be provided. Cash from bookstores must be periodically picked up, tallied, verified, and deposited in a drop safe pending transfer to a bank.

Bank deposits should be made on a timely basis to prevent the buildup of cash on premises. Large cash deposits may require the use of an armored car service. All job duties, such as ordering, billing, and disbursement, should be separate and reconciled on a regular basis. External audits should be conducted at least annually.

Inland marine exposure is from accounts receivable for payments from parents and students, audio-visual equipment for items transported between classrooms, computers for offices and classrooms, and valuable papers and records for student records and library books. Duplicates should be made of all data and kept off-site for easy replication. There may be contractors' equipment for machinery used to maintain the premises.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired non-owned exposure for employees running errands. Any employee who uses his or her own vehicles for college business should have a valid driver's license. If the college owns vehicles, all drivers must have an appropriate license and acceptable MVRs. All vehicles must be well maintained and records kept at a central location.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 8221 Colleges, Universities, And Professional Schools
  • NAICS CODE: 611310 Colleges, Universities and Professional Schools
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 67509, 67508, 67510, 67511
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 8868, 9101

Description for 8221: Colleges, Universities, And Professional Schools

Division I: Services | Major Group 82: Educational Services | Industry Group 822: Colleges, Universities And Professional Schools

8221 Colleges, Universities, And Professional Schools: Colleges, universities, and professional schools furnishing academic courses and granting academic degrees. The requirement for admission is at least a high school diploma or equivalent general academic training.

  • Colleges except junior
  • Professional schools: eg dental engineering law medical
  • Seminaries theological
  • Service academies (college)
  • Theological seminaries
  • Universities

Chiropractic School Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn out more about the exact types of chiropractic school insurance policies you'll need, what coverage limits you need as well as the associated premiums, consult with a reputable broker that is experienced in commercial insurance.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Education, Colleges, Universities & Schools Insurance

Learn about small business commercial insurance for educators that helps protecting your professional reputation and other legal liabilities arising from your educational services.


Education, Colleges, Universities And Schools Insurance

The exposures of one individual educational institution may be totally different from those of another. Because of this, comprehensive surveys of each facility are needed to accurately determine the proper insurance program needed by each.

While the exposures may be significantly different, they have the common component of educating a student and providing faculty that is competent and facilities that are safe for learning.

Many of these institutions have a number of buildings, extensive grounds, and expensive equipment. Comprehensive property and liability insurance is crucial, as is protection and coverage for tuition income, athletic events, teachers’ liability and many other exposures.

Educators' Legal Liability (ELL) coverage provided by insurers may have significant differences. It is important to compare what is available to meet the exposures and financial needs of a given educational institution or school district. Different ELL forms may even have substantially different insuring agreements. There are three main types of insuring agremeements in ELL policies:

Insuring Agreement A: The language in this agreement refers to coverage being provided contingent on receiving the policy premium. It states that coverage is subject to all relevant policy provisions. The carrier also states that the policy issuance is a result of completely relying on the accuracy of the information provided by the applicant/insured. This agreement refers to a Self Insured Retention .

Insuring Agreement B: This company's agreement is worded similarly to the language found in most standard commercial policies. It states that the company will pay on behalf of an insured that faces an allegation of performing a wrongful act. It also states that it will not respond to acts that occur before either the policy's effective date or the applicable retroactive date.

Insuring Agreement C: The language in this carrier's agreement is more specific. It makes reference to paying on behalf of an insured due to liability involving eligible, education operations acts. It also contains wording that reflects its claims-made basis of coverage.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Commercial Articles Floater, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Directors and Officers, Employee Benefits, Professional, Umbrella, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Nonownd Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Spoilage, Computer Fraud, Extortion, Animal Floater, Contractors' Equipment, Fine Arts, Musical Instruments, Theatrical Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Stop Gap Liability and Active Shooter.


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