Brewery Insurance (Quotes, Cost & Coverage)

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Frequently Asked Questions About
Commercial General Liability Insurance

How much does commercial insurance cost?

Costs can vary widely based on industry and are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. Request a free quote to get an exact number.

What kind of business insurance do I need?

Most business owners need General Liability Insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you will need workers compensation insurance too.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance is proof of coverage. It lists the type and amount of liability coverage you have and other policy information when a third party requests it.

Is business insurance tax deductible?

Yes. you can deduct the cost of commercial insurance premiums. The IRS considers insurance a cost of doing business as long it benefits the business & serves a business purpose.

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Brewery Insurance

Brewery Insurance

Brewery Insurance. Breweries are coming on the scene every year, and beer drinkers are getting more variety in the type of beer they can have. For beer drinkers, this is good news because now they can have the perfect brew to go with anything they want. Right now there are over 2300 breweries in the U.S. Even with this high number each brewery is different. If you're the owner of a brewery, then you must do everything in your power to protect your business. The way to do this is to get the right brewery insurance for your business.

Breweries produce beer and beer products from grain that has been ground or milled, boiled, filtered, fermented, and aged. The final product is packaged, usually in glass or metal containers, labeled, and stored or distributed to retailers and concessionaires. Operations may include a number of warehouses for storage of finished goods. Smaller breweries ("microbreweries," "brewpubs," or "craft brewers") may have a retail store selling directly to the general public or facilities for on-premises consumption, such as a full-service restaurant.

Brewery insurance protects your brewing company from lawsuits with rates as low as $77/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Manufacturing Risks In The Brewing Process

There are many risks involved in the production of beer. For you to get the best insurance for your brewery, the first thing you must consider is - the type of brewery you operate. You must take into considerating if you'll be offering a tasting room, pub or restaurant. Whatever it is you should be thinking about it when choosing your brewery insurance coverage. In any business, the things that happen that you didn't prepare for can bankrupt your business without the proper coverage.

Brewery Insurance Policies

Running brewing company operation puts you at the many risks that come with it. The last thing you want happening is your business suffering because you didn't take action to protect it.

Here are some insurance plans you can consider for your business:

Business property coverage: This type of brewery insurance protects the building and the contents in them which you may be using to operate your business. With the unpredictable happening in life such as fire, inclement weather, and theft your business could face lots of damage. Having this type of insurance keeps your business covered.

Another thing you must ensure is that your business property policy includes coverage for business interruption. If you ever have to relocate, or can't operate this insurance pays for lost income and other expenses.

Commercial auto insurance: Having this type of insurance plan in place protects the vehicles you use in the operation of your business. Also, you can get hired or non-owned vehicle insurance if your employees use their personal vehicles for business reasons.

Employment practices liability: This type of coverage keeps you covered if your company is sued by an employee who claims that you are involved in discriminatory employment activity.

Crime coverage: with this type of insurance your business is protected if an employee or a group of employees engages in theft while working for you.

Workers Compensation: This coverage is a very important part of your insurance coverage. Without it, you won't be able to operate in most states if you have any non-owner employees. Having this coverage for your business will help if an employee is hurt while on the job. If an employee is injured and needs medical attention because you have this coverage, all expenses are covered.

Cyber liability insurance: If you don't take the time to secure your business network properly then you could risk a breach of information on your network. If a cyber breach ever happens in your business, this is the type of protection to keep you covered.

Other Insurance Polices To Consider

Tank collapse coverage: If a tank collapses this insurance will cover all expenses as a result of the collapse.

Restaurant property coverage: If a restaurant is a part of your brewing business this insurance keeps the equipment you use in your restaurant covered.

Breweries' Risks & Exposures

Property exposure is high. Ignition sources include electrical wiring, heating and air conditioning systems, production equipment and machinery, and refrigeration/cooling equipment. Combustibles include the fuel sources for the equipment or machinery used in processing, dust from grain that can explode, finished alcoholic products, and packaging materials. All machinery must be inspected and maintained regularly to avoid wear and tear or overheating losses. Wiring must be up to date and of sufficient capacity. All machinery should be grounded to prevent static buildup and discharge.

There should be adequate ventilation systems in place to prevent dust from grains from building up and spontaneously combusting. Due to its combustibility, an ammonia detection system should be in place if ammonia is used as a refrigerant. With any food product, even a small fire loss can be significant as state, local or federal regulations may require the disposal of major portions of stock and raw materials that have been exposed to fire, smoke, heat or water.

Procedures for recycling and for cleaning and sterilizing bottles should be in place. Separation of raw material, processing, and final product are important in controlling the exposure to fire loss. Business income exposure may be high due to the use of specialized machinery and equipment that may be difficult to repair or replace quickly.

Equipment breakdown exposure is high due to the automated machinery and equipment which can malfunction or break down. All machinery and equipment must be regularly inspected and maintained as a lengthy breakdown to brewery machinery could result in severe loss, both direct and under time element. If there are boilers, operational safety valves must be in place.

Premises liability exposure is light if visitor access is limited. If tours are given, the brewer should meet all life safety codes to assure visitor safety, especially from exploding containers. Good housekeeping and nonslip flooring finishes are critical to minimize slips and falls. Spills of liquids should be promptly cleaned up and warning signs posted. Exits should be clearly marked and free of obstacles. Adequate interior and exterior lighting should be available in the event of a power outage.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair, with snow and ice removed, and generally level. Premises liquor liability hazards will increase if samples are handed out. The off-premises exposure is high if delivery drivers stock shelves for customers. Contractual liability may be a concern if there is a sidetrack agreement.

Liquor liability exposure is limited unless alcohol is served or sold on premises. If tours are conducted, alcohol must be given or sold only to those who can prove they are of legal age. Employees must be trained not to serve alcoholic beverages to those who are intoxicated.

Products exposures are moderate due to the possibility of contamination, spoilage, foreign objects in containers, or explosion from a pressurized canister. Raw materials may be imported from foreign countries. Incoming materials should be inspected before accepted. The workplace must meet all FDA specifications for sanitary working conditions and be arranged to prevent foreign substances from entering the processing area. An on-site testing laboratory is recommended to verify quality control.

Pest control and the chemical applications used are key processes to evaluate. Stock dating and rotation are important factors. If by-products of the brewing operation are sold elsewhere, such as brewer's yeast, grain for feed and vitamins, or carbon dioxide, the additional products hazards must be checked carefully. Warning labels must be in place indicating the potential damage of alcohol to unborn children. An effective recall program must be in place that can be activated immediately.

Environmental impairment exposure is from underground fuel storage, leakage or refrigerants such as ammonia and chlorofluorocarbons, and waste disposal. Storage and waste disposal must comply with all federal and state requirements. Outside contractors should remove waste from the site on a regular basis. If wastewater is discharged into public waterways, a permit must be obtained from the EPA. The presence of underground storage tanks usually means that a UST policy must be purchased.

Workers compensation exposure can result from burns caused by the cooking process or machinery and equipment, cuts or accidental dismemberment from rotating blades or moving parts on machinery, back injuries or hernias from lifting, foreign objects in the eye, and slips and falls from inadequate housekeeping in processing areas. All machinery must be properly guarded. Employees may be exposed to chemicals or excessive noise.

Adequate safety equipment should be required for employees in processing areas. Forklifts should be equipped with backup alarms and be refueled in well-ventilated areas. As with products liability exposure, there is potential injury to workers from exploding pressurized containers, or other injury from major explosions in the workplace.

Anhydrous ammonia refrigerants are poisonous when leaked into confined spaces such as coolers. Controls must be in place to maintain, check, and prevent such injury. Employees delivering goods to customers can be injured in vehicle accidents or during robberies.

Crime exposure is employee dishonesty of both inventory and money. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. The inventory must be under the supervision of more than one individual so that there are checks and balances. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and handling bank statements.

Regular audits by an outside firm should be conducted. Loading docks should be supervised to minimize employee theft of finished goods. If drivers pick up checks or accept any money, there is both an employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities concern. Receipts should be issued for any cash payments received.

Inland marine exposure comes from accounts receivable if the brewer bills customers, computers (which may include computer-run production equipment), contractors' equipment for forklifts, goods in transit, and valuable papers and records. Finished products are transported on company-owned trucks. Any overturn or collision could cause a total loss due to the fragility glass containers and the possibility of contamination.

All loads must be secured to prevent shifting during transport. Valuable papers and records include proprietary formulas, inventory records, customer files, and contracts with suppliers and distributors.

Commercial auto exposures are usually significant as delivery is an ongoing part of the operation. Deliveries may be made in darkness, during inclement weather, or on small roads or streets where there is little margin of error. Drivers should be assigned to routes to increase their familiarity with traffic patterns. Because many deliveries are made to grocery stores, drivers must be trained to be aware of the presence of children around and behind the vehicles.

Drivers must have a commercial license and acceptable MVRs. Random drug checks should be conducted. For long-haul deliveries, drivers may not exceed DOT standards for the number of hours worked per day and per week. If containers of anhydrous ammonia are being transported, they must be secured in the cargo area to prevent asphyxiating the driver due to leakage. All vehicles must be well maintained with records kept in a central location.

Brewing Company Coverage

When you own a business, the first concern is the safety of that business. In brewing, many things can go wrong, but you always want to ensure you are safe. If there is something that goes wrong in your business and you do not have the right insurance in place, you could lose everything. You don't have to risk losing everything by a lawsuit choose to protect your business today and get the right insurance coverage plan.

Small Business Economic Data & Insurance Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. Maybe you want to contribute to the economic growth of your community. Whatever the reason is, if you're thinking about starting a small business, it's important to understand pertinent information relating to small businesses in the United States; namely economic information and insurance regulations. After all, if you want your small business to succeed, you have to understand the economic trends organizations of a similar size in your area.

Likewise, you want to ensure that your small business is well protected with the right business insurance and that you are in compliance with the rules and regulations that pertain to commercial insurance in your region.

Small Business Information

Read up on economic statistics and insurance information that relates to small business owners in the United States.

Small Business Economic Data In The United States

Here's a look at some information that was compiled by the Small Business Association (SBA) regarding the economic data that pertains to small businesses in the United States:

  • In 2015, small businesses in the United States employed an estimated 58.9 million American workers, or 47.5 percent of the nation's private workforce.
  • Largest shares = fewer than 100 employees. The small businesses that employed 100 people or less had the largest share of employment amount small businesses.
  • Employment increased by nearly 2 percent. In 2018, employment amongst small businesses increased by 1.8 percent, which is an increase of 1 percent from the prior year.
  • Increase in proprietors. In 2016, the number of small business proprietors increased by 2.3 percent.
  • In 2015, small businesses were responsible for creating 1.9 million net jobs. Organizations that employed 20 people or less had the largest gains, as they added an estimated 1.1 million net jobs.
  • There were 5.7 million loans that were value less than $100,000 issued by lenders in the United States in 2016. These loans were issued under the Community Reinvestment Act.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the incorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $50,347 in 2016.
  • Small business owners that were self-employed at the unincorporated businesses that they owned reported a median income of $23,060 in 2016.
Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage. The SBA recommends the following insurance plans for small business owners:

  • Commercial Property Insurance: In the case of an unplanned disaster - fire, flood, vandalism, theft, etc. - this type of coverage will help you avoid paying for the damage out of your own pocket. Even if you rent the property, you should still carry commercial property insurance.
  • Commercial Liability Insurance: In the event that a legal situation arises - a negligence lawsuit, for example - commercial liability coverage will provide financial protection. It will cover the cost of legal defense fees, court fees, and even moneys that may be awarded.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: If you operate a vehicle for any activities that are related to your business - transporting and/or delivering goods, or meeting with clients - commercial auto insurance is legally required for businesses of all sizes, including small businesses.

Additional Resources For Food Service Insurance

Learn about restaurants, bars, liquor stores commercial insurance coverages. See how small business food service insurance help protect against accidents, oversights and lawsuits resulting from business operations.


Food And Drink Insurance

There are major differences in the food service business and the very different exposures they present. There are many specific types of restaurants to cater to individual needs and tastes. There a several main commercial insurance classifications for food service.

Concessionaires: The most basic "eat on the run" type of restaurant is not classified as a restaurant at all but is referred to as a concessionaire. Class Code 11168: Concessionaires applies and the accompanying note states that all food and beverages must be sold through hawking or peddling. There can be no location to which customers walk up and purchase the food. This classification includes food sold at sporting events, exhibitions, and parks.

Caterers: Are very similar to restaurants with significant differences. The caterer prepares the meals at its own kitchen or commissary and then transports it to the locations where it will be served. Some final preparation may take place at the final location but the majority generally takes place at the caterer's location. The caterer's employees serve the meals and beverages and oversee the consumption of the food.

Restaurants: The way restaurants are categorized and classified uses the percentage of alcoholic beverage sales as the first criteria, followed by other features or operations.

Common to all of these categories is that entertainment-oriented venues such as nightclubs, cabarets, dance halls, discotheques, and comedy clubs must be separately classified and rated. This means that the sales that those entertainment activities generate must be broken out and rated separately from the sale or food and drink.



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Brewery Insurance
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