Pizzeria Insurance Oregon (Quotes, Cost & Coverage)

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Frequently Asked Questions About
Commercial General Liability Insurance

How much does commercial insurance cost?

Costs can vary widely based on industry and are also determined by zip code and often payroll and/or gross sales. Request a free quote to get an exact number.

What kind of business insurance do I need?

Most business owners need General Liability Insurance at the very least. If you have any non-owner employees, you will need workers compensation insurance too.

What is a Certificate of Insurance?

A Certificate of Insurance is proof of coverage. It lists the type and amount of liability coverage you have and other policy information when a third party requests it.

Is business insurance tax deductible?

Yes. you can deduct the cost of commercial insurance premiums. The IRS considers insurance a cost of doing business as long it benefits the business & serves a business purpose.

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Pizzeria Insurance Oregon

OR Pizzeria Insurance

Pizzeria Insurance Oregon. There's nothing better than freshly made pizza. It's a crowd pleaser and one of the most popular takeout foods. You are passionate about the pizza you make and you love serving your specialty pies to your community. In addition to serving customers in your restaurant, you may also offer delivery services.

Pizzerias specialize in baking and serving pizzas. Other items may be included on the menu, such as sandwiches or a salad bar. They may have a buffet during lunch or dinner hours. Most offer pickup and delivery as well as table service. Some offer pizzas that the customer can pick up and bake at home.

Some have arcade games to entertain customers while waiting for food. Alcohol may be part of the operation but is often limited to beer and wine. Some pizzerias are located within a larger operation, such as a convenience store. There may be facilities for unique events such as birthdays.

In addition to providing your customers with fresh, tasty food, an inviting atmosphere, and prompt service, you also have other responsibilities. It's your job to make sure that your customers, your employees, and any vendors you work with are safe from hazards and unforeseen events. You can offer the best protection by carrying the right type of pizzeria insurance Oregon.

Pizzeria insurance Oregon protects your pizza shop from lawsuits with rates as low as $37/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Is Insurance Important For Pizzeria Owners?

While you go above and beyond to ensure that you are serving the best quality food and make every effort to protect the safety of your patrons and employees, there's no way to prevent the unforeseen. For example, a customer may slip and fall while dining in your establishment, or an employee may be involved in an accident while making a delivery.

As the owner of a OR pizza shop, you are responsible for ensuring the safety of your patrons and your employees. Therefore, you are liable for any damages that may occur, including the cost of medical care that may be needed and repairs for damaged property. Additionally, you are also responsible for any damages to your property, as well as the contents within your pizzeria.

With the right pizzeria insurance Oregon, you can protect yourself from the serious financial losses that can occur when the unforeseen happens.

What Type Of Insurance Should Pizza Shops Have?

A pizza shop should have at least the below listed different types of pizzeria insurance Oregon policies. Some of the most important policies include:

  • Commercial General Liability - This is a broad business insurance policy that all OR pizzeria owners should carry. It protects you from the various risks that are associated with your pizzeria, including third-party accidents and injuries, legal claims made by third parties, and defective property. For example, if a customer claims that he suffered food poisoning after eating a pizza you served and files a lawsuit, general liability insurance will cover legal fees, as well as any damages that are awarded. Or, if a vendor trips over boxes in your restaurant while making a delivery of supplies, this insurance will pay for any medical care that is needed.
  • Commercial Property Insurance - This type of insurance policy protects the physical structure of your business, as well as the contents. For instance, if a pizza oven catches on fire and damages your restaurant commercial property insurance will cover the cost of the damages.
  • Business Interruption - Your livelihood depends on your pizzeria being open and accessible to the customers that you serve. If there is ever a reason to close down your restaurant for an extended period of time - for example, a pizza oven catches on fire and does extensive damage to your eatery - business interruption insurance will help to cover lost wages, including payroll for your employees.
  • Commercial Auto - If you offer delivery, business auto insurance is a must. If you or an employee is in an accident while delivering food to a client, your standard auto insurance will not cover the cost of damages or injuries. For that, you would need business auto insurance. This type of policy will cover both bodily injuries and property damage that occur as a result of an auto accident.
  • Workers Compensation - Depending on where your pizzeria is located, you are legally required to carry workers compensation insurance. However, even if this coverage isn't legally required, you should still consider carrying it. Workers' comp insurance offers protection for your employees if they are involved in a work-related accident or suffer a work-related illness. For instance, if an employee sustains a burn while preparing a pizza, this type of insurance will pay for medical care. It can also cover lost wages while the employee is unable to work, and can assist with legal fees, should the employee file a lawsuit against you.

Oregon Pizza Shop's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures are high due to public access to the premises. If there is a buffet or salad bar, customers will move throughout the pizzeria with pizza and beverages, generating spills that can result in slips and falls. Spills must be cleaned up as they occur. Children can cause spills but also can burn themselves on hot food and beverages. Temperatures of hot beverages must be limited to reduce injuries due to scalding.

All employees must be instructed in proper customer handling, including how to deal with disgruntled or overly enthusiastic customers. Older patrons and those with mobility limitations are more prone to injury should a fall occur. Procedures should be in place to assist these customers in choosing and transporting food to their table. Lists of ingredients should be posted to prevent allergic reactions.

Food contamination is a concern as displayed food is accessible to all customers on a buffet or salad bar. Sneeze guards must be present, and the food should be monitored to ensure that foreign objects or substances have not been added. There should be a rotation process and a maximum time that food can be kept out. Floor covering must be in good condition with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked.

Sufficient exits must exist and be well marked, with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair, with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. Outdoor security and lighting must be consistent with the area.

Products liability exposure is from food poisoning, contamination, and allergic reactions from food carried off premises for consumption. Monitoring the quality of food received, posting lists of ingredients, and maintaining proper storage temperature can reduce this exposure.

Liquor liability exposure is usually minor at a pizzeria due to a large amount of food and the family atmosphere. If beer and wine are served, any failure to comply with state and federal regulations can result in the loss of a liquor permit. All employees who serve liquor must be trained to recognize signs of intoxication. A procedure should be in place to deny service to underage or intoxicated patrons.

The popularity of pizzerias around college campuses can lead to underage drinking. There must be monitoring so customers purchasing alcoholic beverages do not then pass them to patrons who are underage or intoxicated.

Workers compensation exposures come from slips, falls, cuts, burns, puncture wounds, foreign objects in the eye, heavy and awkward lifting, and interaction with customers. Food handling can result in passing bacteria or viruses, resulting in illness. Flour dust can produce allergic reactions or respiratory problems such as asthma. Anhydrous ammonia refrigerants are poisonous when leaked into confined spaces such as coolers.

Controls must be in place to maintain, check, and prevent such injury. Cleaning workers can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. As with all retail businesses, hold-ups are possible, so employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner. The employees tend to be minimum wage and turnover may be high. Company incentives to encourage long-term employment are positive signs of management control.

Delivery drivers are subject to both driving hazards and hold ups. Drivers should carry minimal amounts of cash. All delivery addresses should be confirmed before sending the driver. A procedure must be in place to check for the driver if he or she does not return within a reasonable amount of time.

Property exposures are from electrical wiring, cooking equipment, refrigeration units, and heating and air conditioning systems. All wiring should be current, up to code, and well maintained. Ammonia used in refrigeration units can explode. A system designed to detect leaks should be in place. Some pizzerias have only ovens and surface cooking while others may have grills or deep fat fryers. If the cooking exposure is limited to the ovens and non-grease-producing surface cooking, the fire exposure is viewed as a baking-only exposure.

If a conveyer belt cooking method is used for the pizza and sandwiches, cleanup is important to prevent buildup and potential fire from the grease and crust that is spilled. If there are grills or deep fat fryers, these must have automatic fire extinguishing protection, hoods, and filters. There should be fuel shut-offs and adequate hand-held fire extinguishers. The kitchen must be kept clean and grease free to prevent the spread of fire.

Filters should be changed regularly. Spoilage exposure is very high. Power outages of even moderate duration can render fresh and frozen goods to be condemned as unfit for consumption or sale. Business income with extended time period coverage should be purchased as clientele will switch after a major loss due to the lag time between the re-opening and the return to full operations.

Equipment breakdown exposures can be high as operations are dependent on refrigeration and cooking equipment which can break down or malfunction. All equipment must be regularly inspected and maintained as a lengthy breakdown could result in a severe loss, both direct and under time element.

Crime exposure comes from employee dishonesty and money and securities. Criminal background checks should be conducted on any employee handling money. Many customers pay in cash. Money should be removed from the cash drawer at regular intervals and deposited in an on-premises safe or at the bank throughout the day to prevent substantial accumulations. There must be a separation of duties between employees handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements. If the restaurant sells cigarettes or provides alcohol, theft of stock could be a problem. Drivers of delivery vehicles could be robbed of stock or money. They should carry a minimum amount of cash.

Inland marine exposures include computers for tracking inventories and valuable papers and records for employee and supplier records.

Commercial auto exposures can be very high when delivery is provided due to the high turnover and youthful ages of employees. Guaranteed delivery times encourage reckless behavior and should not be permitted. All drivers must have appropriate licenses, acceptable MVRs, and should be drug tested. Company vehicles should be used for all deliveries. Maintenance should be documented. If employees use their own vehicles, the vehicles should be checked for maintenance and upkeep. Because most personal auto policies do not provide coverage when the vehicle is used for commercial purposes, requiring proof of insurance will be of little assistance.

Pizza Shop Insurance

To find out what type of insurance you should have for your OR pizzeria - and how much coverage you should have for each policy - contact a reputable insurance broker to discuss.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2018.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2018 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Food Service Insurance

Learn about restaurants, bars, liquor stores commercial insurance coverages. See how small business food service insurance help protect against accidents, oversights and lawsuits resulting from business operations.


Food And Drink Insurance

There are major differences in the food service business and the very different exposures they present. There are many specific types of restaurants to cater to individual needs and tastes. There a several main commercial insurance classifications for food service.

Concessionaires: The most basic "eat on the run" type of restaurant is not classified as a restaurant at all but is referred to as a concessionaire. Class Code 11168: Concessionaires applies and the accompanying note states that all food and beverages must be sold through hawking or peddling. There can be no location to which customers walk up and purchase the food. This classification includes food sold at sporting events, exhibitions, and parks.

Caterers: Are very similar to restaurants with significant differences. The caterer prepares the meals at its own kitchen or commissary and then transports it to the locations where it will be served. Some final preparation may take place at the final location but the majority generally takes place at the caterer's location. The caterer's employees serve the meals and beverages and oversee the consumption of the food.

Restaurants: The way restaurants are categorized and classified uses the percentage of alcoholic beverage sales as the first criteria, followed by other features or operations.

Common to all of these categories is that entertainment-oriented venues such as nightclubs, cabarets, dance halls, discotheques, and comedy clubs must be separately classified and rated. This means that the sales that those entertainment activities generate must be broken out and rated separately from the sale or food and drink.


Request a free Pizzeria Insurance Oregon quote in Albany, Ashland, Astoria, Aumsville, Baker, Bandon, Beaverton, Bend, Boardman, Brookings, Burns, Canby, Carlton, Central Point, Coos Bay, Coquille, Cornelius, Corvallis, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dallas, Damascus, Dayton, Dundee, Eagle Point, Estacada, Eugene, Fairview, Florence, Forest Grove, Gervais, Gladstone, Gold Beach, Grants Pass, Gresham, Happy Valley, Harrisburg, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Hubbard, Independence, Jacksonville, Jefferson, Junction, Keizer, King, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Lafayette, Lake Oswego, Lakeview town, Lebanon, Lincoln, Madras, McMinnville, Medford, Milton-Freewater, Milwaukie, Molalla, Monmouth, Mount Angel, Myrtle Creek, Myrtle Point, Newberg, Newport, North Bend, Nyssa, Oakridge, Ontario, Oregon, Pendleton, Philomath, Phoenix, Portland, Prineville, Redmond, Reedsport, Rogue River, Roseburg, Salem, Sandy, Scappoose, Seaside, Shady Cove, Sheridan, Sherwood, Silverton, Sisters, Springfield, St. Helens, Stanfield, Stayton, Sublimity, Sutherlin, Sweet Home, Talent, The Dalles, Tigard, Tillamook, Toledo, Troutdale, Tualatin, Umatilla, Union, Veneta, Vernonia, Waldport, Warrenton, West Linn, Willamina, Wilsonville, Winston, Wood Village, Woodburn and all other cities in OR - The Beaver State.


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