Oregon Ice Cream Shop Insurance

Or call for your free quote:

Get the best OR small business insurance quotes online & info on cost, coverage, minimum requirements, certificates & more.

Oregon Ice Cream Shop Insurance Policy Information

OR Ice Cream Shop Insurance

Oregon Ice Cream Shop Insurance. Ice cream is quite possibly the most universally beloved confectionery. To make sure the smiles keep coming from happy customers, you depend on your equipment and your employees. But what if your ice cream equipment breaks down or an employee is injured on the job? Would your insurance provide enough coverage to pay for repairs or medical costs?

Ice cream parlors sell ice cream and related products, and may operate on a seasonal basis. While some offer table service, others have customers place orders and pick them up at a counter. Some offer sandwiches or other types of fast food items and may have a cooking exposure.

There's always a chance of possible loss, damage or theft of your utensils, damage to your kitchens, or an expensive claim if an employee or member of the public is injured or worse due to your work. That's why it's important to manage these risks and keep your business safe with a tailored Oregon ice cream shop insurance policy.

Oregon ice cream shop insurance protects your parlor from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do You Need Ice Cream Shop Insurance?

The Oregon ice cream shop insurance is suitable for anyone who owns or manages an ice cream parlor, shop or cafe selling ice cream and frozen treats. Compared to a standard business insurance policy, a Oregon ice cream shop insurance meets the needs of the hospitality industry. For example, you will probably find your business is seasonal so you carry different levels of stock during the year. This policy can be tailored to your requirements so you're only paying for coverages that are relevant to your operation.

Types Of Ice Cream Store Insurance

The risks for an OR ice cream store can be very wide because of the many different exposures involved with your business activities. Before paying costly fees for an attorney's advice, we can at least help you to identify some of the potential claims that could arise and the Oregon ice cream shop insurance coverages that would protect you in the event of such claims:

Food Contamination Insurance: Many ice cream stores also have a deli or restaurant, where you are serving hamburgers or chicken sandwiches. Cross-contamination of raw meat with ice cream could cause serious illness among your patrons. Protect your business with the food contamination policy.

Commercial General Liability: General liability Insurance protects your business from various third party liability claims:

  • Premises Liability - Protects you in the event that one of your customers sustains an injury while on your premises. An example would be a child dropped is ice cream on floor and another customer slipped and fell on it.
  • Product Liability - If one of the products you sell causes a an illness or injury, this coverage will help pay for your legal and court fees if a lawsuit should arise.

Equipment Insurance: What do you do when your dispensing machines stop working? Or if your store was vandalized... Pretty much, you have nothing to sell. Unless of course you have all risk equipment insurance. All risk means that you are protected from any peril that damages your equipment. You do not need to specify which perils you are protecting your business from - all risks means just that - complete protection.

Business interruption: This Oregon ice cream shop insurance policy provides coverage to make sure that if something unfortunate were to happen, you won't be out of pocket. For instance, if you suffered fire damage at your premises meaning you were unable to open, business interruption will typically cover your gross profit and fixed expenses while we get you back on your feet. This means you shouldn't be out of pocket if the worst does happen.

Workers' Compensation: Workers comp is required in most states for any non-owner employees. Protect yourself with OR workers compensation that covers employees' occupational injury expenses.

Employee Dishonesty: This Oregon ice cream shop insurance coverage protects your business from financial loss in the event that one of your employees steals from your business or engages in other illegal behavior while working for you.

Cyber Liability: If you also retail the ice cream through your website, Facebook or any other channel, you may be aware that you are at risk of a variety of cyber crimes. Hackers can get into your account and forge payments, or steal business or customer financial information and use it for illegal means. Cyber liability insurance will protect your business from losses incurred from crimes like these.

Commercial Crime: Unfortunately, crime occurs in many retail stores, including ice cream stores. Crimes you are open to include theft, shoplifting, fraudulent payment for merchandise, embezzlement, and vandalism that destroys your stock. Since this is a significant risk, you should protect your store with crime insurance. If an employee steals money from the cash register or someone vandalized your property, you have insurance to cover the loss.

Business Owners' Policy (BOP): BOPs are great for ice cream stores because they are affordable and they offer both the general liability, business personal property and business interruption on a single bundled policy. With this Oregon ice cream shop insurance policy, you can obtain coverage in case a patron gets injured as well as protect your business against property claims.

Commercial Umbrella: This is a coverage that adds excess coverage to your other liability policies. If you reach the maximum limits of coverage on an insurance claim, a commercial umbrella provides additional coverage to help prevent your ice cream store from having to pick up the balance.

OR Ice Cream Parlor's Risks & Exposures

Property exposures are from electrical wiring, cooking, refrigeration units, and heating and air conditioning systems. Wiring must be up to code, well maintained and adequate to support freezers. If ammonia is used as a refrigerant, there should be a leakage detection system to prevent an explosion. Refrigeration equipment must be inspected and maintained on an ongoing basis.

While cooking may be limited to microwave and ovens, there may be grills and deep fat fryers. These must be protected with automatic fire extinguishing equipment, shutoff valves, hoods, and filters. The kitchen must be kept clean and grease free to prevent fire spread. Filters should be regularly changed. Spoilage losses can be severe if the refrigeration equipment malfunctions or loses power.

Controls should be in place. Ice cream and other food items are highly susceptible to damage. A small fire or power outage can cause all stock to be condemned as unfit for consumption or sale. Loss of business income can be high after a loss, particularly if operations are seasonal.

Equipment breakdown exposure is due to the reliance of the business on properly maintained and electrically powered freezers. These must be regularly inspected and maintained.

Premises liability exposures are moderate due to public access to the premises. When seating is provided, customers may pick up their orders at a counter and carry them to their tables, generating spills that can result in slips and falls. Housekeeping must be excellent and spills must be cleaned up promptly. If hot beverages are served, temperatures must be limited to reduce injuries due to scalding.

Older patrons and those with mobility limitations are more prone to injury should a fall occur. Procedures should be in place to assist these customers in transporting purchases to their table. Floor covering must be in good condition with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked. Exits must be well marked, with backup lighting systems in case of power failure. Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair, with snow and ice removed if operations are year round, and generally level and free of exposure to slip and falls.

Outdoor security and lighting must be consistent with the area. Seasonal operations may present an attractive nuisance hazard when not in use. There should be adequate security during the off-season. Lists of ingredients should be posted to prevent allergic reactions.

Products liability exposure is high due to the possibility of food poisoning, contamination and allergic reactions from food carried off premises for consumption. Monitoring the quality of food received, posting lists of ingredients, and maintaining proper storage temperature can reduce this exposure. The stock should be regularly rotated so older products are sold first. Out of date stock must be removed on a regular basis and discarded.

Workers compensation exposures are high due to slips, falls, cuts, burns, puncture wounds, foreign objects in the eye, frostbite from working with frozen food, heavy and awkward lifting, and interactions with customers. All walk-in freezers must have inside escape releases. Food handling can result in passing bacteria or viruses, resulting in illness. Anhydrous ammonia refrigerants are poisonous when leaked into confined spaces such as coolers.

Controls must be in place to maintain, check, and prevent such injury. As with all retail businesses, hold-ups are possible so employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner. Cleaning workers can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. The employees tend to be minimum wage and turnover may be high. Company incentives to encourage long-term employment are positive signs of management control.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and loss of money and securities. Criminal background checks should be conducted on any employee handling money. Most transactions are handled with cash. Money should be removed from the cash drawer at regular intervals and either deposited at the bank or stored in an on-premises safe. There must be a separation of duties between employees handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements.

Inland marine exposures include computers for tracking inventory and valuable papers and records for employee and supplier information.

Business auto exposures are generally limited to hired and nonownership liability for employees running errands.

OR Ice Cream Shop Insurance

Owning an OR ice cream parlor is a reliable and fun way to earn a living. Ice cream is popular with all ages and can sell year round. Shops have a lot of activity in them, particularly during the busy seasons, and this introduces to more potential risks to your business. You can protect yourself from unexpected events, risks and hazards by carrying the right types and amounts of commercial insurance.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2021.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2021 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Food Service Insurance

Learn about restaurants, bars, liquor stores commercial insurance coverages. See how small business food service insurance help protect against accidents, oversights and lawsuits resulting from business operations.


Food And Drink Insurance

Bars, taverns, restaurants, cafeterias, and other eating and drinking places have significant insurance needs in three separate areas.

The first is property protection for physical damage to equipment, furnishings, building and supplies due to fire and other perils.

The second is premises liability coverage to protect customers due to slips, trips and falls on the premises, as well as for consumption of food products.

The final need is protection for employees due to frequent cuts, burns and other common employee injuries. Establishments that sell or serve liquor or other alcoholic beverages also need liquor liability coverage.

Slips and falls, along with customer illness due to being served tainted food or drink, are the primary liability exposures. The commercial general liability (CGL) is used to provide coverage for these exposures.

It is important to note that liquor liability coverage is excluded under the CGL form if a risk is in the business of serving alcoholic beverages. Many establishments in this category should therefore consider purchasing a separate liquor liability coverage form.

Restaurant kitchen equipment, inventory and dining room fixtures are common exposures for most eating and drinking places. Many of these establishments do not own the buildings they occupy but have long-term leases and have invested money in various improvements and betterments, including cooking equipment, dining room decorations and permanent fixtures.

There are major differences in the food service business and the very different exposures they present. There are many specific types of restaurants to cater to individual needs and tastes. There a several main commercial insurance classifications for food service.

Concessionaires: The most basic "eat on the run" type of restaurant is not classified as a restaurant at all but is referred to as a concessionaire. Class Code 11168: Concessionaires applies and the accompanying note states that all food and beverages must be sold through hawking or peddling. There can be no location to which customers walk up and purchase the food. This classification includes food sold at sporting events, exhibitions, and parks.

Caterers: Are very similar to restaurants with significant differences. The caterer prepares the meals at its own kitchen or commissary and then transports it to the locations where it will be served. Some final preparation may take place at the final location but the majority generally takes place at the caterer's location. The caterer's employees serve the meals and beverages and oversee the consumption of the food.

Restaurants: The way restaurants are categorized and classified uses the percentage of alcoholic beverage sales as the first criteria, followed by other features or operations.

Common to all of these categories is that entertainment-oriented venues such as nightclubs, cabarets, dance halls, discotheques, and comedy clubs must be separately classified and rated. This means that the sales that those entertainment activities generate must be broken out and rated separately from the sale or food and drink.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Spoilage, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Nonowned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivables, Bailees Customers, Fine Arts, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Environmental Impairment, Liquor Liability, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Garagekeepers and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Oregon Ice Cream Shop insurance quote in Albany, Ashland, Astoria, Aumsville, Baker, Bandon, Beaverton, Bend, Boardman, Brookings, Burns, Canby, Carlton, Central Point, Coos Bay, Coquille, Cornelius, Corvallis, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dallas, Damascus, Dayton, Dundee, Eagle Point, Estacada, Eugene, Fairview, Florence, Forest Grove, Gervais, Gladstone, Gold Beach, Grants Pass, Gresham, Happy Valley, Harrisburg, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Hubbard, Independence, Jacksonville, Jefferson, Junction, Keizer, King, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Lafayette, Lake Oswego, Lakeview town, Lebanon, Lincoln, Madras, McMinnville, Medford, Milton-Freewater, Milwaukie, Molalla, Monmouth, Mount Angel, Myrtle Creek, Myrtle Point, Newberg, Newport, North Bend, Nyssa, Oakridge, Ontario, Oregon, Pendleton, Philomath, Phoenix, Portland, Prineville, Redmond, Reedsport, Rogue River, Roseburg, Salem, Sandy, Scappoose, Seaside, Shady Cove, Sheridan, Sherwood, Silverton, Sisters, Springfield, St. Helens, Stanfield, Stayton, Sublimity, Sutherlin, Sweet Home, Talent, The Dalles, Tigard, Tillamook, Toledo, Troutdale, Tualatin, Umatilla, Union, Veneta, Vernonia, Waldport, Warrenton, West Linn, Willamina, Wilsonville, Winston, Wood Village, Woodburn and all other OR cities & Oregon counties near me in The Beaver State.

Also find Oregon insurance agents & brokers and learn about Oregon small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including OR business insurance costs. Call us (503) 610-0300.

Free Business Insurance Quote Click Here