Indiana Supermarket Insurance

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Indiana Supermarket Insurance Policy Information

IN Supermarket Insurance

Indiana Supermarket Insurance. Supermarkets are a vital part of any community. They supply the public with all of their essentials, including various types of food, dry goods, health and wellness items, and even pet products! Yes, it's safe to say that a supermarket is exceptionally important.

Supermarkets sell a variety of foodstuffs, which can be baked, bottled, canned, fresh, or frozen. Items can be prepackaged or bulk. Some produce baked goods while others prepare salads, rotisserie chickens, or heat-and-eat meals. There may be a butcher department for fresh fish or meat cutting or a delicatessen.

Many supermarkets sell an assortment of nonfood items such as auto maintenance items, books and magazines, clothing, cooking utensils, flowers, greeting cards, household cleaning items, kitchenware, light hardware or tools, liquor products (where permitted), lottery tickets, novelties, over-the-counter medications, personal care products, pet supplies, seasonal decorations, or tobacco.

Services offered may include branch banks, fast food restaurants, gasoline or fuel oil sales, hair or nail salons, pharmacy, shoe repair, U.S. Post Office or Western Union substations, or video rentals.

In some areas, the supermarket may be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Whether you own and operate a small local grocery store or you are head a large, multi-chain supermarket, making sure that you are set up for success is an absolute must. Of all the different things that you'll need for your supermarket, there's one that many may say is more important than all the rest: insurance.

Why is Indiana supermarket insurance so important? What type of coverage do the owners and operators of IN supermarkets need to invest in? Keep on reading to find the answers to these questions and more.

Indiana supermarket insurance protects your market from lawsuits with rates as low as $57/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Supermarkets Need Insurance?

Like other business owners, IN supermarket owners and operators face numerous risks. A jar could break on the floor and a customer could slip on the contents, an employee could fall off of a ladder while stocking shelves, a customer could file a lawsuit against you claiming that something they purchased at your supermarket resulted in food poisoning, your supermarket could be damaged in a storm or by an act of vandalism, or you could be forced to shut down for a prolonged period of time.

These are just a few examples of the risks that supermarket owners and operators face, and you are liable for any of the related costs.

As you can imagine, if an unforeseen circumstance arises and you were faced with exorbitant bills, there's a good chance that you could be looking at serious financial losses. That's why having the right type of Indiana supermarket insurance is so important, because in the event that an unexpected event does occur, instead of having to pay for the associated costs out of your own pocket, your insurer will cover them for you.

In other words, insurance can help to protect you from serious financial hardship. Add to that the fact that insurance ensures you are compliant with local laws and regulations, as groceries are legally required to carry certain types of Indiana supermarket insurance coverage.

What Type Of Insurance Do Supermarket Need?

The specific type of Indiana supermarket insurance coverage that a supermarket will need to have in place depends on a number of factors; where you grocery store is located, the size of the store, how many employees work for you, and more.

Because the type of insurance coverage that supermarkets need does vary, it's important to speak with a reputable insurance agent to find out what policies you need to have in place so that you can ensure you are properly covered.

With that said, however, here's a look at some basic Indiana supermarket insurance coverages that you'll want to have:

  • Commercial Property: This type of insurance covers the commercial structure of your supermarket, as well as the contents within it, from acts of nature, theft, and vandalism. For example, if a riot were to break out in your area and your supermarket were targeted, commercial property insurance would help to cover any damages to your building, as well as any inventory that may be stolen.
  • Commercial General Liability: This kind of insurance provides you with protection against third-party property damage and personal injury claims. For instance, if a customer were to slip and fall while they were shopping, suffer an injury, and file a lawsuit against you, commercial general liability insurance would cover any related expenses, including your legal defense fees and any settlements that you may need to pay out.
  • Workers' Compensation: As an IN employer, you are responsible for providing your employees with a safe workspace. As such, if any members of your staff suffer a work-related injury, this kind of insurance will help to pay for any medical care they may require, and will compensate them for any income that they may lose if they are unable to work while they are recovering.

Theses policies are just a few examples of the type of Indiana supermarket insurance coverage you should consider for your grocery market.

IN Supermarket's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is very high due to public access to the premises. Slips, trips, and falls are major concerns, especially during inclement weather when customers track snow, mud, and water into the facility. All goods should be kept on easily reached shelves so that customers do not pull items down on themselves.

Customers drop items in the produce area and may carry food and other items throughout the store, generating spills that can result in slips and falls. Housekeeping should be excellent with spills cleaned up promptly. Warning signs should be posted after mopping.

Floor coverings must be in good condition, with no frayed or worn spots on carpet and no cracks or holes in flooring. Steps and uneven floor surfaces should be prominently marked. There should be well marked and sufficient exits, with backup lighting systems in case of power failure.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair, with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slip and falls. Customers can be injured or killed during a robbery.

Security of visitors in parking areas is rapidly becoming the responsibility of the owner or operator of the premises. Outdoor security and lighting must be consistent with the area.

Products liability exposure is high due to the possibility of food poisoning, contamination, spoilage, foreign objects in the product, and allergic reactions. Monitoring the quality of food received, posting lists of ingredients, and maintaining proper storage temperature can reduce this exposure.

Food processing areas must meet all FDA specifications for sanitary working conditions and be arranged to prevent foreign substances from entering the area. There should be controls in place to prevent contamination from chemicals such as insecticides and pesticides used for pest control.

The stock should be regularly rotated so older stock is sold first. Out of date stock must be removed on a regular basis and discarded. Accurate records must be kept of products and batches to monitor for recalls.

Liquor liability exposures are from selling liquor to underage individuals and those already intoxicated as there is no on-premises consumption of alcoholic beverages. Any failure to comply with state and federal regulations can result in the loss of a liquor permit.

There must be a set procedure to check ages of anyone attempting to purchase alcohol. Employees must be trained to recognize signs of intoxication.

Workers compensation exposure is very high due to lifting heavy cartons and sides of meat that can cause back injury, hernias, sprains, and strains. Floors may become slick, resulting in slips and falls. Diseases may be transmitted from handling meat.

Repetitive stress injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome plague butchers, as do cuts and potential injury from saws, grinders, and other meat processing equipment, foreign objects in the eye, and hearing impairment from noise.

Anhydrous ammonia refrigerants are poisonous when leaked into confined spaces such as coolers. Controls must be in place to maintain, check, and prevent such injury. Cooking can result in burns.

Cleaning workers can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. Employees should be provided with safety equipment including guards on machinery, trained on proper handling techniques, and have conveying devices available to assist with heavy lifting.

In any retail business, hold-ups are possible, so employees should be trained to respond in a prescribed manner.

Property exposures are very high from electrical wiring, processing equipment, cooking equipment, refrigeration units, and heating and air conditioning systems. The wiring must be current and up to code. Due to its combustibility, an ammonia detection system should be in place if ammonia is used as a refrigerant.

If cooking is done on premises, all grills and deep fat fryers must have automatic fire extinguishing protection, hoods, and filters.

There should be fuel shut-offs and adequate hand-held fire extinguishers. The kitchen must be kept clean and grease free to prevent the spread of fire. Filters should be changed regularly. The storage and disposal of boxes, packaging, and wrappings can increase the fuel load for fire if not handled properly.

If there are any on-premises incinerating devices to burn or dispose of combustible waste, the age, condition, maintenance, and controls are key. Spoilage exposure is very high if refrigeration equipment malfunctions or loses power. A small fire or a power outage of even moderate duration can cause all fresh and frozen goods to be condemned as unfit for consumption or sale.

Alarms and warning devices should be in place to alert the operation to loss of power. Backup power, such as a generator, should be available. Theft is a concern as some types and cuts of meat are high in value and easily fenced. Appropriate security measures should be in place, such as keeping more expensive meats behind glass and inaccessible to customers and having security mirrors prominently displayed throughout the store.

Premises alarms should report to a central station or police department after hours.

Equipment breakdown exposures can be high as operations are dependent on refrigeration and cooking equipment.

Crime exposure can be severe for both employee dishonesty and theft of money and securities. Background checks should be conducted on all employees. The inventory must be under the supervision of more than one individual so that there are checks and balances. All orders, billing, and disbursements must be handled as separate duties.

Regular audits must be conducted. If there is a 24-hour exposure or even late night/early morning hours, supermarkets can be targets for holdup. Money should be regularly stripped from the cash drawers and irregular drops made to the bank during the day to prevent a substantial accumulation of cash on the premises.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivables from billings to customers, computers for inventories and sales transactions, signs, and valuable papers and records for suppliers' and employees' information. Backup copies of all records, including computer records, should be made and stored off premises.

Commercial automobile exposure may be limited to hired or non-owned liability exposures from employees using their vehicles to run errands. If delivery services are provided, only company vehicles should be used. Drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles should be properly maintained, and records retained.

Indiana Supermarket Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the types of Indiana supermarket insurance policies you'll need, how much coverage your market needs - speak with an experienced insurance agent who understands the unique risks of supermarkets.

Indiana Economic Data And Business Insurance Regulations

Made In Indiana

There are many factors that lead to the success of a business; top on the list of importance is location. In order to thrive, it's essential for a business to be located in an area that offers a favorable economic climate. Regardless of how high-quality the products and services a company offers, if isn't located in an area that will benefit from those products and services, success is going to be a struggle. Furthermore, it's important for business owners to know what type of commercial insurance they are required to carry in the state they are operating in.

If you are thinking about starting a business in Indiana or expanding your existing company to the state, you'll want to familiarize yourself with its economics and commercial insurance requirements before you set up shop. Below, we provide an overview of economic trends and types of insurance coverage business owners need in The Hoosier State.

Economic Trends For Indiana Business Owners

As of January, 2021, the unemployment rate in the state of Indiana was 3.5 percent; .4 percent lower than the national average, which was 3.9 percent at the start of the year. The unemployment rate in The Hoosier State has been holding steady for more than five years, as it has been below the national average since 2014. It's expected that this rate will continue to be the norm for 2021 and the next few years.

All areas throughout the state of Indiana are favorable for business owners, as both urban and suburban areas offer suitable conditions. According to economists, the best areas to start a business in The Hoosier State include:

  • Auburn
  • Batesville
  • Bluffton
  • Clarksville
  • Decatur
  • Jasper
  • Monticello
  • Rensselaer
  • Warsaw

Several industries thrive in Indiana, but industries that are seeing the most growth in the state include:

  • Agriculture
  • Auto manufacturing
  • Information technology
  • Life sciences
  • Mining
  • Research and design
  • Transportation
  • Wholesale and retail services
Commercial Insurance Requirements In Indiana

The Indiana Department of Insurance (IDOI) regulates insurance in Indiana. Commercial insurance is vital for the success of a business, as it not only protects the owners and operators of the organization, but it also protects the customers and vendors that a company works with, as well as the employees that they rely on.

Commercial insurance provides coverage for certain risks that businesses face, ensuring that third-parties and employees have access to the funds needed in the event of an accident; it also prevents business owners from having to pay for damages and legal expenses in the event that a catastrophe occurs.

In Indiana, business owners in all industries are required to carry workers' compensation insurance. Depending on the nature of the industry, other forms of coverage may be required. For example, organizations that sell and distribute alcohol must carry liquor liability coverage, and companies that use vehicles in a work-related capacity must invest in commercial auto insurance.

The specific amount of coverage required for these policies depends on several factors, such as the size of the business, how many people it employs, and the specific nature of the operation.

Additional Resources For Food Service Insurance

Learn about restaurants, bars, liquor stores commercial insurance coverages. See how small business food service insurance help protect against accidents, oversights and lawsuits resulting from business operations.


Food And Drink Insurance

Bars, taverns, restaurants, cafeterias, and other eating and drinking places have significant insurance needs in three separate areas.

The first is property protection for physical damage to equipment, furnishings, building and supplies due to fire and other perils.

The second is premises liability coverage to protect customers due to slips, trips and falls on the premises, as well as for consumption of food products.

The final need is protection for employees due to frequent cuts, burns and other common employee injuries. Establishments that sell or serve liquor or other alcoholic beverages also need liquor liability coverage.

Slips and falls, along with customer illness due to being served tainted food or drink, are the primary liability exposures. The commercial general liability (CGL) is used to provide coverage for these exposures.

It is important to note that liquor liability coverage is excluded under the CGL form if a risk is in the business of serving alcoholic beverages. Many establishments in this category should therefore consider purchasing a separate liquor liability coverage form.

Restaurant kitchen equipment, inventory and dining room fixtures are common exposures for most eating and drinking places. Many of these establishments do not own the buildings they occupy but have long-term leases and have invested money in various improvements and betterments, including cooking equipment, dining room decorations and permanent fixtures.

There are major differences in the food service business and the very different exposures they present. There are many specific types of restaurants to cater to individual needs and tastes. There a several main commercial insurance classifications for food service.

Concessionaires: The most basic "eat on the run" type of restaurant is not classified as a restaurant at all but is referred to as a concessionaire. Class Code 11168: Concessionaires applies and the accompanying note states that all food and beverages must be sold through hawking or peddling. There can be no location to which customers walk up and purchase the food. This classification includes food sold at sporting events, exhibitions, and parks.

Caterers: Are very similar to restaurants with significant differences. The caterer prepares the meals at its own kitchen or commissary and then transports it to the locations where it will be served. Some final preparation may take place at the final location but the majority generally takes place at the caterer's location. The caterer's employees serve the meals and beverages and oversee the consumption of the food.

Restaurants: The way restaurants are categorized and classified uses the percentage of alcoholic beverage sales as the first criteria, followed by other features or operations.

Common to all of these categories is that entertainment-oriented venues such as nightclubs, cabarets, dance halls, discotheques, and comedy clubs must be separately classified and rated. This means that the sales that those entertainment activities generate must be broken out and rated separately from the sale or food and drink.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Spoilage, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Nonowned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivables, Bailees Customers, Fine Arts, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Environmental Impairment, Liquor Liability, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Garagekeepers and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Indiana Supermarket insurance quote in Anderson, Angola, Auburn, Avon, Bargersville, Bedford, Beech Grove, Bloomington, Bluffton, Brazil, Brownsburg, Carmel, Cedar Lake, Charlestown, Chesterton, Clarksville, Columbia City, Columbus, Connersville, Crawfordsville, Crown Point, Danville, Dyer, East Chicago, Elkhart, Elwood, Evansville, Fishers, Fort Wayne, Frankfort, Franklin, Garrett, Gary, Goshen, Granger, Greencastle, Greenfield, Greensburg, Greenwood, Griffith, Hammond, Highland, Hobart, Huntertown, Huntington, Indianapolis, Jasper, Jeffersonville, Kendallville, Kokomo, La Porte, Lafayette, Lake Station, Lakes of the Four Seasons, Lawrence, Lebanon, Logansport, Lowell and Decatur, Madison, Marion, Martinsville, Merrillville, Michigan City, Mishawaka, Mooresville, Muncie, Munster, Nappanee, New Albany, New Castle, New Haven, Noblesville, North Vernon, Notre Dame, Peru, Plainfield, Plymouth, Portage, Princeton, Richmond, Schererville, Scottsburg, Sellersburg, Seymour, Shelbyville, South Bend, Speedway, St. John, Tell City, Terre Haute, Valparaiso, Vincennes, Wabash, Warsaw, Washington, West Lafayette, Westfield, Westville, Yorktown, Zionsville and all other cities near me in IN - The Hoosier State.

Also find Indiana insurance agents & brokers and learn about Indiana small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including IN business insurance costs. Call us (317) 559-0759.

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