Catering Insurance Iowa

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Catering Insurance Iowa Policy Information

IA Catering Insurance

Catering Insurance Iowa. Caterers prepare food to serve at a customer's location or rented facility for parties, weddings, meetings, receptions, or other events. Food is usually prepared at the caterer's location, then transported to the event. The caterer's own staff generally sets up a buffet line or provides wait service to guests.

Caterers may rent chairs, decorations, dishes, linens, and tables. They may provide alcoholic beverages, served with or without a bartender. They may offer entertainment or music.

Whether you run a small catering operation out of your home kitchen or you run a large organization that caters food for big events, there are a lot of risks associated with owning and operating a catering business. You serve food to the general public which means that you need to make sure that it is 150 percent safe for consumption. You also have to meet the needs of your clients and make sure that the members of your staff are cared for; that's just a small portion of your responsibilities.

You've put a lot of hard work into establishing your catering business and you go above and beyond to make sure that all needs are being met and everything is running smoothly; but mishaps can happen. To protect yourself from the unexpected, it's important that you have the right type of catering insurance Iowa in place.

Catering insurance Iowa protects your business from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Is Insurance Wo Important for Caterers?

Working as a IA caterer can be very rewarding, but it can also be extremely demanding. There's a lot that you need to attend to; the food you offer has to be safely prepared and made to the specifications of your clients, you have to provide a safe environment for your employees to work in, you make deliveries, you take orders, you handle money... that's just a small sampling of your responsibilities.

Even though you try your best to make sure that everything runs smoothly, you've got a lot on your plate, which means that mishaps are bound to arise. A vendor could slip and fall while making a food delivery to your facility; a client file a lawsuit against you, claiming that the food you served was responsible for food poisoning; an employee could cut herself while chopping fruits for a platter. These are just some of the issues that can arise, and you're legally responsible for all of them.

The cost of injuries, medical expenses, repairs, and legal fees and everything else that you could be facing if a travesty occurs can be exorbitant. Paying for these costs out of your own pocket could put you in financial ruin. That's why it's so important to have the right type of catering insurance Iowa in place; it prevents you from having to pay such expenses yourself, which saves you from economic hardship and the potential loss of your livelihood.

What Type of Insurance do Caterers Need?

The exact type of catering insurance Iowa and the amount of coverage a caterer should carry varies. There are several factors that affect your insurance needs, such as the size of your catering business, what type of clients you serve, how many employees are on-staff, and where your business is located.

While the specificities of insurance do vary from caterer to caterer, there are certain coverages that all catering professionals should have in place, including:

  • Commercial General Liability - This type of insurance protects you against third-party personal injury and property damage claims. For instance, if a client claims that you damaged their kitchen while using it to prepare food for an event that they hired you for, commercial general liability will cover the legal expenses, as well as any damages that the client may be entitled to.
  • Workers Compensation - If you employ a staff, even if it's just one person, you'll need to carry workers' comp insurance. This coverage will help to pay for any medical care that staff members may need if they become injured or ill on the job; it can also cover a portion of the employee's lost wages and litigation, should he or she file a lawsuit against you.
  • Commercial Auto - If use a car, van, truck, or any other vehicle for work-related reasons, you'll also need commercial auto insurance. Should an employee cause an accident while making a food delivery, commercial auto will cover the cost of the damages that were made to the vehicle, building, or any other property that the employee crashed into.

These are just some of the insurance options that IA catering companies should invest in.

IA Caterer's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure at the caterer's own location is minimal as there is little or no public access. The off-premises exposures are at locations generally not familiar to either the caterer or the customer. The caterer should review the area before the event to determine the hazards involved. Servers must be well trained in the handling of hot food.

Seating areas must be reviewed regularly for spills to reduce the exposure to slips and falls. Temperatures of hot beverages must be limited to reduce injuries due to scalding. All employees must be instructed in proper customer handling, including how to deal with disgruntled, intoxicated, or overly enthusiastic customers.

There should be a contract between the caterer and the client to prevent disputes. There must also be a contract between the caterer and the owner of the event facility so that each party's responsibilities are clearly understood.

Products liability exposure is higher than in an on-site eating establishment because of the time delay between food preparation and serving. Illness can result from food poisoning, contamination, and allergic reactions. Maintaining proper temperatures during transport is vital. Monitoring the quality of food received, posting of ingredients, and maintaining proper storage temperature can reduce this exposure. Quality control requires limits on the length of time food may stay in the buffet area.

Liquor liability exposure can be very high in states that hold caterers liable for injuries resulting from alcohol consumption. The type and amount of alcohol served directly impact this exposure. Failure to comply with state and federal regulations can result in the loss of a liquor permit which may adversely impact the business.

Employees who serve alcohol should complete training courses in recognizing intoxication problems and dealing with customers. This can be a particular problem at private parties where there may be an open bar. An agreement must be in place with the contracted party as to how to control this exposure.

Workers compensation exposures come from slips, falls, cuts, puncture wounds, burns, foreign objects in the eye, heavy and awkward lifting, and interactions with customers. Employees should be trained on the carrying of heavy dishes between the kitchen and the serving areas. Food and beverage handling can result in passing bacteria or viruses, resulting in illness. The employees tend to be minimum wage and turnover may be high. Company incentives to encourage long-term employment are positive signs of management control.

Property exposures are from electrical wiring, refrigeration units, cooking equipment, and heating and air conditioning systems. All wiring should be current, up to code, and well maintained. While cooking may be limited to ovens, there may be grills and deep fat fryers. These must have automatic fire extinguishing protection, hoods, and filters. There should be fuel shut offs and adequate hand-held fire extinguishers.

The kitchen must be kept clean and grease free to prevent fire spread. Filters should be changed frequently. Spoilage exposure is high as a small fire or a power outage of even moderate duration can cause all fresh and frozen goods to be condemned as unfit for consumption or sale. Business income and extra expenses can be minimized if there is an alternative location to prepare food if there is a loss.

Equipment breakdown exposures are high as operations are dependent on the availability of cooking and refrigeration equipment.

Crime exposures are from employee dishonesty and loss of money and securities. Criminal background checks should be conducted on any employee handling money. Cash from bars should be regularly stripped and moved to a safe area. All orders, billing, and disbursements must be handled as separate duties. Regular audits must be conducted.

Inland marine exposure includes accounts receivable from billings to customers, a special property floater for food and equipment transported and used off site, and valuable papers and records for customer and supplier information.

Business auto exposure is moderate due to the food being transported from the caterer's premises to the event location. While it is important to transport the food in a timely manner, there must be sufficient time provided for its safe transport. All drivers must have an appropriate license for the vehicle being driven and acceptable MVR. Company vehicles should be used for all deliveries.

These must be maintained with records maintained at a central location. If employees use their own vehicles, the vehicles should be checked for maintenance and upkeep. Because most personal auto policies do not provide coverage when the vehicle is used for commercial purposes, requiring proof of insurance will be of little assistance.

IA Catering Insurance

To make sure that your business is properly protected, speak to an experienced insurance agent to find out exactly what type of catering insurance Iowa coverage you need and how much coverage you should carry.

Iowa Economic Data, Regulations & Limits On Business Insurance

Business-minded individuals who are thinking about starting up a new venture need to ensure that they choose a location for their operation that will allow them to achieve success. It's vital that the place you select for your organization offers a market that will respond to the products and services you offer, otherwise your efforts will be for naught.

Made In Iowa

If you are considering the state of Iowa as the home base for your business or as a new location for a branch of your company, being aware of the economic trends in the state are crucial. Furthermore, knowing what type of commercial insurance you need to carry is also vital for your success. Below, we offer a brief overview of both the economic trends for the state of IA, as well as what type of commercial insurance business owners need to carry in the state.

Economic Trends For Businesses In Iowa

The state of Iowa has experienced positive economic growth in the past few years. As of January, 2019, the unemployment rate in the state was 2.4 percent, a 0.4 decrease from the previous year, when the unemployment rate was 2.8 percent in January of 2018. Compared to the national unemployment rate, which rose to 4.0 percent in January of 2019, it's clear to see that Iowa offers promise for the workforce, as well as business owners. According to the state's Workforce Development, more residents of Iowa are working now than ever before.

While locations throughout the state offer promising opportunities for business owners, Des Moines, in particular, seems to show the most promise, as, according to economists, it's the third best city to start a business in the United States. Economists also suggest that areas surrounding the city of Des Moines also offer great potential for business development.

Several industries are seeing growth in The Hawkeye State, and are expected to continue to see growth throughout the 2019 calendar year. These industries include:

  • Agriculture and food production
  • Information and communication technology
  • Manufacturing
  • Renewable energy and fuels
  • Warehousing and distribution
IA Commercial Insurance Regulations And Limits

The Iowa Insurance Division regulates insurance in the IA. As with every other state in the country, business owners in Iowa are legally required to have certain types of commercial insurance.

In IA, any business that has one or more employees must carry workers' compensation insurance, which provides coverage for workplace-related injuries and illnesses that employees may sustain.

Additional Resources For Food Service Insurance

Learn about restaurants, bars, liquor stores commercial insurance coverages. See how small business food service insurance help protect against accidents, oversights and lawsuits resulting from business operations.


Food And Drink Insurance

Bars, taverns, restaurants, cafeterias, and other eating and drinking places have significant insurance needs in three separate areas.

The first is property protection for physical damage to equipment, furnishings, building and supplies due to fire and other perils.

The second is premises liability coverage to protect customers due to slips, trips and falls on the premises, as well as for consumption of food products.

The final need is protection for employees due to frequent cuts, burns and other common employee injuries. Establishments that sell or serve liquor or other alcoholic beverages also need liquor liability coverage.

Slips and falls, along with customer illness due to being served tainted food or drink, are the primary liability exposures. The commercial general liability (CGL) is used to provide coverage for these exposures.

It is important to note that liquor liability coverage is excluded under the CGL form if a risk is in the business of serving alcoholic beverages. Many establishments in this category should therefore consider purchasing a separate liquor liability coverage form.

Restaurant kitchen equipment, inventory and dining room fixtures are common exposures for most eating and drinking places. Many of these establishments do not own the buildings they occupy but have long-term leases and have invested money in various improvements and betterments, including cooking equipment, dining room decorations and permanent fixtures.

There are major differences in the food service business and the very different exposures they present. There are many specific types of restaurants to cater to individual needs and tastes. There a several main commercial insurance classifications for food service.

Concessionaires: The most basic "eat on the run" type of restaurant is not classified as a restaurant at all but is referred to as a concessionaire. Class Code 11168: Concessionaires applies and the accompanying note states that all food and beverages must be sold through hawking or peddling. There can be no location to which customers walk up and purchase the food. This classification includes food sold at sporting events, exhibitions, and parks.

Caterers: Are very similar to restaurants with significant differences. The caterer prepares the meals at its own kitchen or commissary and then transports it to the locations where it will be served. Some final preparation may take place at the final location but the majority generally takes place at the caterer's location. The caterer's employees serve the meals and beverages and oversee the consumption of the food.

Restaurants: The way restaurants are categorized and classified uses the percentage of alcoholic beverage sales as the first criteria, followed by other features or operations.

Common to all of these categories is that entertainment-oriented venues such as nightclubs, cabarets, dance halls, discotheques, and comedy clubs must be separately classified and rated. This means that the sales that those entertainment activities generate must be broken out and rated separately from the sale or food and drink.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Spoilage, Equipment Breakdown, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Hired and Nonowned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Accounts Receivables, Bailees Customers, Fine Arts, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Environmental Impairment, Liquor Liability, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Garagekeepers and Stop Gap Liability.


Request a free Catering Insurance Iowa quote in Adel, Algona, Altoona, Ames, Anamosa, Ankeny, Asbury, Atlantic, Bettendorf, Bondurant, Boone, Burlington, Camanche, Carlisle, Carroll, Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Centerville, Chariton, Charles City, Cherokee, Clarinda, Clear Lake, Clinton, Clive, Coralville, Council Bluffs, Creston, Davenport, DeWitt, Decorah, Denison, Des Moines, Dubuque, Dyersville, Eldridge, Estherville, Evansdale, Fairfield, Forest City, Fort Dodge, Fort Madison, Glenwood, Grimes, Grinnell, Hampton, Harlan, Hiawatha, Humboldt, Independence, Indianola, Iowa City, Iowa Falls, Jefferson, Johnston, Keokuk, Knoxville, Le Claire, Le Mars, Manchester, Maquoketa, Marion, Marshalltown, Mason City, Monticello, Mount Pleasant, Mount Vernon, Muscatine, Nevada, Newton, North Liberty, Norwalk, Oelwein, Orange City, Osceola, Oskaloosa, Ottumwa, Pella, Perry, Pleasant Hill, Polk City, Red Oak, Sergeant Bluff, Sheldon, Shenandoah, Sioux Center, Sioux City, Spencer, Spirit Lake, Storm Lake, Urbandale, Vinton, Washington, Waterloo, Waukee, Waverly, Webster City, West Des Moines, Windsor Heights, Winterset and all other cities in IA - The Hawkeye State.

Also learn about Iowa small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including IA business insurance costs. Call us (515) 207-7253.

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