Professional Sports Insurance

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Professional Sports Insurance Policy Information

Professional Sports Insurance

Professional Sports Insurance. Professional sports differ from amateur sports in that professional athletes are paid for their athletic skills and performance, while organizing their lives around rigorous professional training that keeps them in top form.

Professional and semi-professional sports clubs are usually members of a national or international association and participate within the structure and framework of the parent organization. An individual or group of individuals, a partnership, or a corporation may own each member club.

Sports facilities that (primarily) serve professional sports teams or athletes may range from swimming pools to ice-skating rinks, from race tracks to facilities for equestrian sports, and from ballparks to soccer fields.

While such facilities unquestionably promote public health as well as helping sports fans enjoy their favorite games, there is no doubt that professional sports facilities also face a multitude of risks.

Any one of the perils a professional sports facility may fall victim to could prove to be extremely costly, and that is why it is so important to carry out an in-depth evaluation of your insurance needs. What types of professional sports insurance coverage might be needed? Keep reading to learn more.

Professional sports insurance protects your organization and facilities from lawsuits with rates as low as $97/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked pro sports insurance questions:


How Much Does Professional Sports Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small pro or semi-pro sports organizatons ranges from $97 to $149 per month based on location, size, revenue, claims history and more.


Why Do Professional Sports Need Insurance?

Lincoln Financial Field

Just like any other business, a professional sports facility can face an array of perils. Not only can professional sports facilities be impacted by the same perils that could affect any commercial venture, regardless of their field, they also have some industry-specific hazards to consider.

Unfortunately, you are not immune from risks no matter what steps you take to prevent accidents and disasters.

Your facility could be damaged in an act of nature, such as an earthquake or flood. Criminal acts like vandalism and theft, which also extends to the digital realm, could lead to great losses.

Essential equipment, such as air conditioning or sound systems, could malfunction and require replacement or repair. Athletes may sustain injuries on your premises and alleges that you are responsible, or an employee may get hurt at work. All these perils can deal serious blows to your financial health.

professional sports insurance is important, in short, not only because some forms of coverage are mandatory, but also because the right insurance safeguards your business interests by giving you the best shot at recovering even if you are impacted by a major peril.


What Type Of Insurance Do Professional Sports Need?

Each type of insurance protects business owners from a specified set of perils, covering costs up to a stipulated amount. professional sports facilities will not only vary greatly depending on the type of sport they are designed to host, but other factors also determine the exact nature of their insurance needs.

The jurisdiction in which your facility is based, your number of staff, the size of your operation, and the value of the equipment you own are merely examples. That is why it is vital to talk your insurance options through with a commercial insurance broker who is deeply familiar with the needs of athletic facilities.

Meanwhile, here is a look at some essential types of professional sports insurance coverage that are usually always needed:

  • Commercial Property - Any business with physical assets needs commercial property insurance, as it covers their building and the assets inside in the event of perils such as theft, vandalism, acts of nature, and certain accidents.
  • Commercial General Liability - This type of professional sports insurance coverage protects you from third party personal injury and property damage liability, as it helps you manage the costs arising from lawsuits. Attorney fees, court expenses, and settlement costs can all be covered.
  • Athletic Participation - Athletic facilities should be aware of the fact that general liability policies exclude sports events. This type of coverage, which may also have slightly differing names, will ensure that you are fully protected. It will pay for costs relating not only to personal injury claims in an athletic context, but also, for instance, the costs that follows if an athletic team sues you after you have to cancel an event due to unforeseen circumstances.
  • Workers' Compensation - Should one of your employees become injured at work, this form of coverage reimburses them for their medical bills. In addition, it covers wages they lose to related work absences. In the process, it protects you from litigation.

While these types of insurance all help protect your financial future even if your professional sports facility is confronted by a major peril, be aware that your business may require other kinds of coverage as well.

A commercial insurance broker can help guide you through the process of building a professional sports insurance comprehensive plan just right for your unique circumstances.


Pro Sport's Risks & Exposures

Raymond James Stadium

Premises liability exposure is high due to the large numbers of visitors on premises and the strong emotions that can arise between rival fans during sporting events. Public and life safety exposures are very important. Good housekeeping is critical to preventing trips, slips, and falls.

Any group tours must be staffed to adequately supervise participants. Escalators and elevators must be inspected regularly. Floor coverings must be in good condition. Adequate lighting, marked exits and egress are mandatory. Steps must have handrails, be well lit, marked, and in good repair. Parking areas should be maintained free of snow and ice.

Security at events, in the building, corridors, and parking areas need to be carefully reviewed. Disaster plans, including terrorist attacks, must be in place and practice drills held with employees. The event and practice facilities may present an attractive nuisance hazard when not in use.

There must be adequate security to prevent unauthorized entry to children, vandals, or would-be terrorists. Personal injury losses may occur due to alleged wrongful removal, invasion of privacy, or discrimination. Contracts with suppliers, vendors, event planners, and performers must be clear as to all responsibilities.

Liquor liability exposure can be quite extensive at a sporting event if employees are not properly trained to recognize the effects of excessive alcohol consumption. Procedures must be in place for checking IDs and refusing to serve underage or intoxicated individuals. There should be a "cut-off" time well before the end of the game to prevent visitors from excessive alcohol consumption prior to driving home.

Products liability exposures can be high if the sports club operates the restaurants or snack bars. Employees should be trained in the proper handling of consumables to prevent foreign objects in food, food poisoning, or the spread of other transmissible diseases. Other product liability exposures can arise from gift shops. If these are contracted out, the club should verify that the operators have adequate liability coverage.

Professional liability exposure comes from any medical doctor or nurse who is part of the staff. The relationship and responsibility for providing insurance must be spelled out in a contract, including the type of procedures that can be handled by the medical professional.

Workers compensation exposure can be very high. Employees who set up, build, or transport stage settings, equipment, lighting, and scenery may be injured by cuts, puncture wounds, electrical shocks and burns, slips and falls, back injury, hernias, strains, or sprains from lifting or working from awkward positions.

Stage and lighting setup may involve aboveground exposures that need additional protection and precautions to avoid falling from heights or being hit by falling objects.

Hawkers, peddlers, and vendors employed by the event facility to sell wares in the stands have high potential to slips and falls from limited visibility as they ascend and descend steps carrying items to sell. Ongoing exposure to noise levels can result in hearing impairment.

Food preparation operations can result in cuts, scrapes, and burns. Cleaning and maintenance operations can result in lung, eye or skin irritations, and reactions.

Adequate security and training must be provided to employees handling money in ticket booths, gift shops, and concession stands to reduce the possibility of injury due to holdups. Security personnel must be trained to deal with both holdups and unruly patrons.

Highly-paid athletes may be injured during training, while traveling to away events, or while competing with other clubs. Their contracts should state whether they are employees of the club or independent contractors.

Instructors, coaches, trainers, and others in related positions may experience sports-type injuries. The legal status of those positions needs careful review to evaluate the actual potential for loss.

Employees may have significant travel-related exposures. The type of travel, frequency, and mode of transit require review. Any owned vehicles or aircraft will result in substantial additional exposures.

Property exposure consists of buildings or personal property owned by the club or for which it has assumed responsibility. Most sports facilities have extensive wiring for lighting, sound systems, and other electronic equipment.

Event sponsors and performers will often bring their own equipment that must be fitted into the electrical system provided by the facility owner.

It must be in good repair, adequate for the equipment used, and meet all current building standards. Circuit breakers and/or fuses must be well maintained with no overrides.

Stage preparations such as building, painting, or gluing of scenery and displays that use wood, plastic, or flammables will contribute to the fire load. Some performers incorporate smoke or fireworks into their shows. These materials must be properly controlled, with all flammables stored in approved containers and cabinets.

If food preparation is done on premises, all cooking equipment must be properly controlled. Smoking should be prohibited throughout the facility. There should be hard-wired smoke detectors throughout the facility.

A sprinkler system is advisable. Domed roofs may collapse due to heavy wind or snow. Training facilities may be located on separate premises. Sports facilities may be a target for vandalism. Business income loss and extra expenses may be high after a loss if backup facilities are not available.

Equipment breakdown exposure may be high due to the heating and air conditioning systems, cooking equipment, hot water systems, electrical control panels, and lighting and sound equipment used for special events. Breakdown and loss of use could result in a significant loss, both direct and under time element, if replacements parts are unavailable or repair time is lengthy.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty and money and securities. Employee dishonesty coverage should be extended to include volunteers. Background checks should be conducted on all employees and volunteers handling money. Employees who are in charge of ordering must not be the same who handle disbursements and billings. Frequent inventories and audits must be conducted for adequate monitoring.

If tickets are sold at events, a significant amount of cash may accumulate. Cashiers' drawers should be kept stripped with regular deposits made throughout the day. There should be a centrally located locked cash room with a guard on hand to protect the employees and money.

All monies should be double counted and balanced with cashier balance sheets. All cashiers must be held accountable for shortages.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the club bills for services, bailees customers, commercial articles, computers, and valuable papers and records for contracts with suppliers and vendors. Values can be high with the wide variety of equipment for sports, sound, lighting, scenery, and displays.

Owned equipment taken off premises can be damaged in transit or stolen. Duplicates of records should be made and stored off-site for easy restoration. Contracts should be reviewed to determine if bailment situations are created with the athletes, speakers, performers, and guests.

Commercial auto exposure can be high since athletes must be moved from one location to another for sporting events. If there are owned vehicles, all drivers must be properly licensed and have acceptable MVRs. Team buses and other owned vehicles must be maintained on a regular basis with service records retained.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 7941 Professional Sports Clubs and Promoters
  • NAICS CODE: 711211 Sports Teams and Clubs
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 40069
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 9178, 9179

Description for 7941: Professional Sports Clubs And Promoters

Division I: Services | Major Group 79: Amusement And Recreation Services | Industry Group 794: Commercial Sports

7941 Professional Sports Clubs And Promoters: Establishments primarily engaged in operating and promoting professional and semiprofessional athletic clubs; promoting athletic events, including amateur; and managing individual professional athletes. Stadiums and athletic fields are included only if the operator is actually engaged in the promotion of athletic events. Establishments primarily engaged in operating stadiums and athletic fields are classified in Real Estate, Industry Group 651. Amateur sports and athletic clubs are classified in Industry Group 799.

  • Arenas, boxing and wrestling (sports promotional): professional
  • Athletic field operation (sports promotion)
  • Baseball club, professional or semi-professional
  • Basketball club, professional or semi-professional
  • Football club, professional or semi-professional
  • Ice hockey clubs, professional or semi-professional
  • Managers of individual professional athletes
  • Professional or semiprofessional sports clubs
  • Promoters, sports events
  • Soccer clubs, professional or semi-professional
  • Sports field operation (sports promotion)
  • Sports promotion: baseball, football, boxing, etc.
  • Stadiums (sports promotion)

Professional Sports Insurance - The Bottom Line

To discover the specific types of professional sports insurance policies you'll need, what coverage you should carry and the associated costs, speak with a reputable commercial insurance agent.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Sports & Fitness Insurance

Learn about small business sports & fitness insurance policies and what they cover so that your customers, employees, and equipment are protected.


Sports And Fitness Insurance

Sorts and recreation includes a wide variety of operations, from individual theater owners to theater chains to corporations that operate properties with recreational facilities spread over many acres. It also includes publicly and privately owned athletic fields, stadiums, golf courses and other athletic facilities.

The risks in this classification are similar in that all involve the admission of large numbers of people combined with significant public access. These shared characteristics mean that all share the potential for catastrophic loss. For this reason, liability coverage with high limits of liability is critical.

Property, workers compensation, crime and inland marine coverages are also important but their necessity varies by type of risk.

This insurance can cover Amusement Parks, Archery Ranges, Athletic Fields, Ballparks, Ballrooms, Billiard Parlors, Bowling Alleys, Carnivals, Country Clubs, Drive-In Theaters, Golf Courses, Outfitters and Guides, Handball and Racquetball Courts, Ice Skating Rinks, Indoor Sports Complexes, Professional Sports, Racetracks-Horse or Dog, Racetracks-Motorized, Recreation Centers, Riding Stables, Roller Skating Rinks, Shooting Ranges, Skatepark, Skeet or Trap Shooting Ranges, Skiing Operations, Stadiums, Swimming Clubs, Tennis Centers, Theaters & Video Arcades.

Sports and fitness facilities have a way of bringing susceptible groups of individuals and situations together that can be potentially dangerous if not properly monitored. The joy and happiness of the moment can quickly change because of a calamity and those calamities can then lead to lawsuits.

Many of these risks have large money exposures every day they operate. Because of this, losses involving cash are the single biggest concern for most recreational facilities. This includes not only holdups and robberies but incidents involving counterfeit currency, computer fraud and forgery as well.

Employee theft is also a major concern in some operations because of attractive types of property or merchandise coupled with high rates of employee turnover.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Bailees, Computers, Contractors' Equipment, Golf Carts, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Environmental Impairment, Umbrella, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Mobile Equipment, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Liquor Liability, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Garagekeepers, Stop Gap Liability and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) (Drones).


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