County Administration Offices Insurance

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County Administration Offices Insurance Policy Information

County Administration Offices Insurance

County Administration Offices Insurance. Country administration offices serve their communities by performing a range of duties - they are involved in making budgetary and planning decisions, analyze progress, and inform members of the public, among other activities.

County administration buildings provide office and meeting facilities for city or county operations. They often have auditoriums or other facilities for public gatherings or for political assemblies.

A council may run counties, either elected or appointed, and may have a mayor who acts as the head. Wide varieties of services are provided by the council to residents in exchange for tax dollars.

The county may provide services such as planning and zoning, licenses and permits, assessors' and surveyors' offices, courts, disease control, sanitation, road construction and maintenance, snow removal, and public protection such as police or fire departments.

Some counties may contract utility services, such as gas, water, or electricity, for residents within their geographical area.

The fact that county administration offices perform public functions does not prevent them from being, in many ways, similar to small- to mid-sized commercial ventures. As diverse kinds of work unfold within county administration offices, they, too, face a variety of risks just like businesses do.

To protect them from the financial blows that can be dealt by such risks, county administration offices require insurance just like any other public or commercial entity.

What types of county administration offices insurance coverage might they benefit from? That is what we will be exploring in this brief guide.

County administration offices insurance protects local government buildings from lawsuits with rates as low as $97/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Below are some answers to commonly asked county administration building insurance questions:


How Much County Administration Offices Insurance Cost?

The average price of a standard $1,000,000/$2,000,000 General Liability Insurance policy for small bcounty administration buildings ranges from $97 to $159 per month based on location, buiding size, services offered, claims history and more.


Why Do County Administration Offices Need Insurance?

County Offices

The public servants who work within county administration offices may do everything in their power to ensure that all the office's duties are performed flawlessly, as well as taking steps to reduce the likelihood that they will be impacted by major perils.

No risk can be reduced to zero, however, and that is why insurance is so important - unlike proactive preventative measures, insurance is an aspect of your risk management plan that will serve you after disaster has already struck.

No building is free of the risk that it will suffer damage, or even be completely destroyed, by an act of nature, to name one example of a universal threat. Government administration offices can be damaged after an earthquake, wildfire, hurricane, or other natural disaster strikes, but theft and vandalism are also concerns.

Accidents - like a car crashing into the building - have to be considered as well.

Then, there are liability-related risks. Should an employee or a member of the public slip on wet stairs and become injured, for example, a governmental or public body can be held financially responsible. In the event that sensitive data is accessed, or an employee commits theft of public property, the resulting legal costs may be significant.

While each entity faces different risks, the presence of risk itself is universal. With that, so is the need for county administration offices insurance.


What Type Of Insurance Do County Administration Offices Need?

The process of obtaining the insurance coverage that best benefits any particular entity, be it a public body or business, is complex. The insurance needs a county administration office may have depend on a multitude of factors - the age of the building, the location and associated climate and weather, and the number of employees are merely some examples.

A commercial insurance broker who specializes in governmental and public organizations is best situated to advise an individual county administration office. Some examples of forms of county administration offices insurance they would recommend are:

  • Commercial Property - This type of insurance covers a county administration office in case their building is struck by an act of nature, or hit by an accident, theft, or act of vandalism. The costs of the resulting damage or losses are (partially) replaced by these policies.
  • General Liability - Designed to protect an organization in the event that a third party files a bodily injury or property damage claim, this type of county administration offices insurance would be called if a neighboring property was damaged when a tree on your property fell down, for instance. A member of the public slipping on a wet floor is another example of the kind of scenario covered.
  • Workers' Compensation - Workers comp pays for the medical bills and any lost wages of an employee who suffers work-related injuries. Although more common in some other fields of employment, county administration office employees can certainly sustain injuries at work.
  • Business Auto - Any organization that uses vehicles over the course of their activities will further require auto insurance, to cover the costs associated with damage or injury after any vehicular accident.
  • Employee Dishonesty Coverage - All public and governmental organizations should also have this type of insurance on their radar, as it covers the financial consequences of employee theft or other forms of dishonesty.

Keep in mind that this list of important forms of county administration offices insurance does not necessarily amount to a comprehensive insurance plan.

To find out more about your specific needs, ask a commercial insurance broker.


County Administration Building's Risks & Exposures

County Office Building

Premises liability exposure is high due to services provided to residents and the public's access to the building. If tours are given, exposures increase significantly as guests may be led through areas generally "off limits" to more casual visitors.

Legislation and judicial decisions have eroded governmental immunity protection in most states. Public and life safety code compliance is very important. To prevent trips, slips, and falls, all premises must be well maintained with flooring in good condition. Adequate lighting, marked exits, and egress are mandatory. Steps must have handrails, be well lit, marked, and in good repair.

An outside service contractor should inspect elevators and escalators annually. Parking lots should be free of ice and snow.

County facilities may be a target for vandals, disgruntled citizens, criminals, or terrorists. Security inside the facility, as well as outside areas including owned parking areas, needs to be carefully implemented and monitored.

An evacuation plan must be in place. Personal injury losses may occur due to an alleged assault, discrimination, invasion of privacy, or unlawful detention.

Public officials' liability exposure can be severe. Today's political climate has seen an increase in lawsuits against public officials for failure to perform the functions of their office, failure to account for tax funds, failure to enforce regulations, failure to follow mandated procedures, such as open bidding on contracts, bad faith, and other errors or omissions. Defense costs can be prohibitively expensive.

Workers compensation exposures are varied, from office workers to volunteers, janitorial staff, building or yard maintenance workers, repair personnel, and drivers. Workers may incur back injuries, hernias, slips, falls, strains, or sprains.

Skin or lung irritations can result from working with cleaning chemicals and paint. Office workers may develop repetitive motion injuries. Workstations should be ergonomically designed. There may be interactions with angry constituents or protestors. Employees should be trained to deal with difficult situations.

Property exposure is generally low. Ignition sources include electrical wiring and heating, and air conditioning systems. There may be a restaurant or cafeteria on premises. Most offices have extensive wiring for lighting, computer, and other electronic equipment. It must be in good repair and adequate for its use.

Valuation may be a concern in older buildings with unique architectural features that may be difficult to rebuild with like construction and quality after a loss. Smoking should be prohibited.

If there is a restaurant or cafeteria on premises, all cooking equipment should be properly protected. Garages for storing, fueling, and maintaining vehicles must be separated from office facilities.

Governmental facilities may be a target for political activists or for terrorists. Adequate security is required. There should be disaster recovery plans in place to continue operations in the event of a large loss.

Crime exposure is from public officials' dishonesty, employee dishonesty, and money and securities. Background checks, including criminal history, must be completed on all employees. Receipts must be provided for all payments of taxes, fees, fines, and penalties, with daily reconciliation between receipts and money received. Regular deposits must be made with adequate security provided.

Money should not be left on premises overnight. There must be regular audits, preferably by an outside firm. All employees must take at least one complete week of vacation each year. If the facilities house offices to collect fees, penalties, or obtain permits and licenses, there may be an exposure to holdup.

Inland marine exposures are from accounts receivable for billings, audio/visual equipment, computers, contractors' equipment, fine arts, and valuable papers and records. Contractors' equipment may be used off-premises to build, maintain, or service municipal streets and roads.

Fine arts such as statuary and paintings, artifacts, historical documents, rare or historical books, or manuscripts may be one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable. If insured, valuation should be done by a qualified appraiser.

Valuable papers and records are often delicate and must be protected from fire, water damage, vandalism, theft, or other losses. All records should be duplicated and retained at an off-site storage facility for easy retrieval in the event of a loss.

Commercial automobile exposure can be high if vehicles are used to transport public officials, guests, and visitors. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. All vehicles must be maintained on a regular basis with records kept in a central location.

During inclement weather, drivers may be on the road for extended hours in adverse conditions. Supervision is necessary so drivers can be rotated and not become overly fatigued.

There may be a hired and non-owned auto exposure if employees use their own vehicles to run errands or attend meetings on municipal business. Employees should carry personal automobile insurance with adequate liability limits.

Commercial Insurance And Business Industry Classification

  • SIC CODE: 9111 Executive Offices, 9121 Legislative Bodies, 9131 Executive and Legislative, Combined, 9199: General Government, Not Elsewhere Classified
  • NAICS CODE: 921110 Executive Offices, 921120 Legislative Bodies, 921130 Public Finance Activities, 921140 Executive and Legislature, Combined, 921190 Other General Governmental Support
  • Suggested ISO General Liability Code(s): 44100, 44101, 44102, 44103, 44104, 44105, 44106, 44108, 44109, 44110, 44111, 44112, 44113
  • Suggested Workers Compensation Code(s): 9015, 8810

Description for 9111: Executive Offices

Division J: Public Administration | Major Group 91: Executive, Legislative, And General Government, Except Finance | Industry Group 911: Executive Offices

9111 Executive Offices: Offices of chief executives and their advisory and interdepartmental committees and commissions.

  • Advisory commissions, executive
  • City and town managers'offices
  • County supervisors'and executives'offices
  • Governors' offices
  • Mayors'offices
  • President's office

9121 Legislative Bodies: Legislative bodies and their advisory and interdepartmental committees and commissions.

  • Advisory commissions, legislative
  • Boards of supervisors
  • City and town councils
  • Congress
  • County commissioners
  • Legislative assemblies
  • Study commissions, legislative

Description for 9131: Executive And Legislative Offices Combined

Division J: Public Administration | Major Group 91: Executive, Legislative, And General Government, Except Finance | Industry Group 913: Executive And Legislative Offices Combined

9131 Executive And Legislative Offices Combined: Councils and boards of commissioners or supervisors and such bodies where the chief executive is a member of the legislative body itself.

  • Legislative and executive office combinations

Description for 9199: General Government, Not Elsewhere Classified

Division J: Public Administration | Major Group 91: Executive, Legislative, And General Government, Except Finance | Industry Group 919: General Government, Not Elsewhere Classified

9199 General Government, Not Elsewhere Classified: Establishments primarily engaged in providing tax return preparation services without also providing accounting, auditing, or bookkeeping services. Government establishments primarily engaged in providing general support for government, which include personnel, auditing, procurement services, and building management services, and other general government establishments which cannot be classified in other industries. Public finance is classified in Industry 9311.

  • Civil rights commissions-government
  • Civil service commissions-government
  • General accounting offices-government
  • General services departments-government
  • Personnel agencies-government
  • Purchasing and supply agencies-government
  • Supply agencies-government

County Administration Offices Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about county administration offices insurance policies need, and how much and what types of coverage you should carry, consult with a commercial insurance broker that is experienced in business insurance.

Types Of Small Business Insurance - Requirements & Regulations

Perhaps you have the next great idea for a product or service that you know will appeal to your local area. If you've got a business, you've got risks. Unexpected events and lawsuits can wipe out a business quickly, wasting all the time and money you've invested.

Operating a business is challenging enough without having to worry about suffering a significant financial loss due to unforeseen and unplanned circumstances. Small business insurance can protect your company from some of the more common losses experienced by business owners, such as property damage, business interruption, theft, liability, and employee injury.

Purchasing the appropriate commercial insurance coverage can make the difference between going out of business after a loss or recovering with minimal business interruption and financial impairment to your company's operations.

Small Business Information

Insurance is so important to proper business function that both federal governments and state governments require companies to carry certain types. Thus, being properly insured also helps you protect your company by protecting it from government fines and penalties.

Small Business Insurance Information

In the business world, there are many risks faced by company's every day. The best way that business owners can protect themselves from these perils is by carrying the right insurance coverage.

The The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight.

Commercial insurance is particularly important for small business owners, as they stand to lose a lot more. Should a situation arise - a lawsuit, property damage, theft, etc. - small business owners could end up facing serious financial turmoil.

According to the SBA, having the right insurance plan in place can help you avoid major pitfalls. Your business insurance should offer coverage for all of your assets. It should also include liability and casual coverage.

Types Of Small Business Insurance

Choosing the right type of coverage is absolutely vital. You've got plenty of options. Some you'll need. Some you won't. You should know what's available. Once you look over your options you'll need to conduct a thorough risk assessment. As you evaluate each type of insurance, ask yourself:

  • What type of business am I running?
  • What are common risks associated with this industry?
  • Does this type of insurance cover a situation that could feasibly arise during the normal course of doing business?
  • Does my state require me to carry this type of insurance?
  • Does my lender or do any of my investors require me to carry this type of policy?

A licensed insurance agent or broker in your state can help you determine what kinds of coverages are prudent for your business types. If you find one licensed to sell multiple policies from multiple companies (independent agents) that person can often help you get the best insurance rates, too. Following is some information on some of the most common small business insurance policies:

Business Insurance Policy Type What Is Covered?
General Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under commercial general liability insurance? It steps in to pay claims when you lose a lawsuit with an injured customer, employee, or vendor. The injury could be physical, or it could be a financial loss based on advertising practices.
Workers Compensation InsuranceWhat is covered under workers compensation insurance? This type of insurance protects a business and its owner(s) from claims by employees who suffer a work-related injury, illness or disease. Workers comp typically provides the injured employee with benefits to cover medical expenses, a portion of his/her lost wages, rehabilitation costs if applicable, and permanent partial or permanent total disability.
Product Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under product liability insurance? I pays an injured party's settlement or lawsuit claim arising from a defective product. These are usually caused by design defects, manufacturing defects, or a failure to provide adequate warning or instructions as to how to safely use the product.
Commercial Property InsuranceWhat is covered under business property insurance? General liability policies don't cover damages to your business property. That's what commercial property insurance is for. It protects all of the physical parts of your business: your building, your inventory, and your equipment, giving you the funds you need to replace them in the event of a disaster. If you work from home, you might consider a Home Based Business Insurance policy instead.
Business Owners Policy (BOP)What is covered under a business owners policy (BOP)? This is a policy designed for small, low-risk businesses. It simplifies the basic insurance purchase process by combining general liability policies with business income and commercial property insurance.
Commercial Auto InsuranceWhat is covered under business auto insurance? This type of insurance covers automobiles being used for business purposes. This could include a fleet of business-only vehicles or a single company car. In some cases it might cover your car or your employee's car while they're being used for business. These policies have much higher limits, ensuring you can cover your costs if one of these vehicles gets into an accident.
Commercial Umbrella PoliciesWhat is covered under commercial umbrella insurance? This type of policy is a sort of "gap" insurance. It covers your liability in the event that a court verdict or settlement exceeds your general liability policy limits.
Liquor Liability InsuranceWhat is covered under liquor liability insurance? It covers bodily injury or property damage caused by an intoxicated person who was served liquor by the policy holder.
Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions)What is covered under professional liability insurance? This type of business insurance is also known as malpractice oe E&O. It covers the damages that can arise from major mistakes, especially in high-stakes professions where mistakes can be devastating.
Surety BondWhat is covered under surety bonds? Bonding is a contract where one party, the SURETY (who assures the obligee that the principal can perform the task), guarantees the performance of certain obligations of a second party, the PRINCIPAL (the contractor or business who will perform the contractual obligation), to a third party, the OBLIGEE (the project owner who is the recipient of an obligation).


Who Needs General Liability Insurance? - Virtually every business. A single lawsuit or settlement could bankrupt your business five times over. You might also need this policy to win business. Many companies and government agencies won't do business with your company until you can produce proof that you've obtained one of these policies.

Business Insurance Required by Law
Small Business Commercial Insurance

If you have any employees most states will require you to carry worker's compensation and unemployment insurance. Some states require you to insure yourself even if you are the only employee working in the business.

Your insurance agent can help you check applicable state laws so you can bring your business into compliance.

Other Types Of Small Business Insurance

There are dozens of other, more specialized forms of small business insurance capable of covering specific problems and risks. These forms of insurance include:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Commercial Flood Insurance
  • Contractor's Insurance
  • Cyber Liability
  • Data Breach
  • Directors and Officers
  • Employment Practices Liability
  • Environmental or Pollution Liability
  • Management Liability
  • Sexual Misconduct Liability

Whether you need any or all of these policies will depend on the results of your risk assessment. For example, you probably don't need an environmental or pollution policy if you're running an IT company out of a leased office, but you would need data breach and cyber liability policies to fully protect your business.

Also learn about small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including small business commercial insurance costs. Call us (855) 767-7828.

Additional Resources For Local, State And Federal Government Insurance

Learn about commercial insurance for local, state and federal government agencies, services, operations and buildings.


Local, State And Federal Government Insurance

Cooperative efforts between insurance professionals and public officials have led to the satisfactory arrangement of coverages for public properties that may include large building schedules spread over a number of locations and geographic areas.

Liability insurance protection is a matter of much greater concern. As governmental and charitable institutional immunity continues to erode, the onslaught of lawsuits makes adequate liability protection essential.

Public utilities have unique insurance needs usually best handled by specialists in their field.

Because government entities are becoming more inventive in raising money, they are involved in activities that may not appear to be government-related so that they may require coverages that at first glance do not seem appropriate for them.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Building, Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Money and Securities, Accounts Receivable, Audio/Visual Equipment, Computers, Contractors' Equipment, Fine Arts, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Cyberliability, Employee Benefits, Public Officials' Liability, Umbrella, Hired and Non-Oowned Auto & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Extra Expense, Flood, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Employment-related Practices, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage and; Stop Gap Liability.


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