Currency Exchange Insurance Alaska

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Currency Exchange Insurance Alaska Policy Information

AK Currency Exchange Insurance

Currency Exchange Insurance Alaska. A money exchange office - in many locations commonly referred to as a bureau de change - provides the vital service of converting its customers' money into a different, desired, currency. In addition to converting money, they may also enable instant money transfers.

Money exchanges handle the conversion of one country's currency to another for a fee. As exchange rates continuously fluctuate due to shifting political and economic circumstances, most money exchanges have sophisticated electronic equipment to make sure the trading and conversion rates are as up-to-the-moment and accurate as possible.

They are in airports, larger hotels, or near tourist attractions to be easily accessible to travelers. The exchange may be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Many banks will provide currency exchange services for their customers.

However, they often act only as money exchange brokers and take client funds to a money exchange, which may not result in a same-day conversion. As a result, banks are not always able to obtain a specific conversion rate for a customer to take immediate advantage of a rate fluctuation.

These ventures make a profit buy buying and selling various currencies, charging a small commission in the process. Despite the rise of cashless payment, physical currency exchange offices continue to be a much-needed amenity.

Owning and operating a money exchange office is not, however, without risks. What kinds of currency exchange insurance Alaska might these facilities need to fall back on if they are impacted by unforeseen circumstances? To find out more, read on.

Currency exchange insurance Alaska protects money exchange businesses from lawsuits with rates as low as $27/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Alaska Currency Exchanges Need Insurance?

Despite the fact that currency exchange desks will do everything in their power to run a smooth operation, these facilities face a number of hazards. In deciding how to protect your business from financial ruin, you have to consider both perils universal to all business owners and those unique to this industry.

An AK money exchange office could, for example, be struck by an act of nature - not much can be done to prevent wildfires, earthquakes, hurricanes, and similar devastating events, but they can severely damage your property and inventory (in this case in the form of cash) shockingly quickly.

An employee or member of the public could be injured on the premises, resulting in costly liability suits, or a piece of essential equipment may suddenly break down and require urgent repair or replacement.

Money exchange desks should additionally factor the risk that they could be impact by criminal acts into their risk management plans. Armed robbery is merely one concern; customers could also attempt to exchange counterfeit currency, or an employee could steal from the business.

These and other costly perils could have such a devastating impact on your financial health that you could, in the worst-case scenario, even be forced to close your exchange office.

Armed with currency exchange insurance Alaska, however, you will not have to bear these burdens alone. Your insurer will cover a substantial portion of the associated costs, so that your money exchange can recover and continue to be successful.

What Type Of Insurance Do AK Currency Exchanges Need?

The types of insurance a money exchange desk should carry to protect their financial interests depend on a variety of factors. The jurisdiction in which the exchange office is based, its number of employees, and the size and scope of the operation are just a few examples.

Because your insurance needs are as unique as your AK exchange office, it is vital to consult a commercial insurance broker, who can help you craft an individualized insurance plan that is just right for your currency exchange office.

In the meantime, here is a look at some of the most important kinds of currency exchange insurance Alaska policies needed:

  • Commercial Property: Regardless of whether you own or rent your commercial property, every business with physical assets requires commercial property insurance. It will help cover the costs associated with property damage or loss resulting from perils such as acts of nature and certain accidents, like fire.
  • General Liability: Should a third party file a personal injury or property damage claim after an incident that happened on your premises or as a result of your company's activities, this kind of currency exchange insurance Alaska coverage is vital. Commercial general liability coverage will help you manage attorney fees and settlement payouts alike.
  • Workers' Compensation: This form of insurance protects you when an employee is injured in the workplace, by covering their medical bills and any lost income. In the process, it also greatly reduces the risk of litigation.
  • Commercial Crime: This type of coverage shields your business from financial losses resulting from criminal acts that include robbery, employee theft, and fraud. It is essential for a money exchange.

Remember that the best insurance plans are custom-made to your particular circumstances. To best meet your business insurance needs and assure that you do not miss out on important currency exchange insurance Alaska policies, talk to a commercial insurance broker.

AK Currency Exchange's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure comes from slips and falls due to public access to the premises. As customer safety and security are very important, the exchange may have one or more armed security guards on duty during operating hours. All employees must be trained in proper procedures during a holdup to minimize the possibility of violence or kidnap of customers.

Floors, stairs, and elevators need to be in good condition, with steps and uneven floor surfaces prominently marked. The number of exits must be sufficient and well-marked, with backup lighting in the event of a power failure. Steps should have handrails, be well-lighted, marked, and in good repair.

Parking lots and sidewalks need to be in good repair with snow and ice removed, and generally level and free of exposure to slips and falls. There should be security in the parking lot equal to or better than the surrounding area.

If the business is open after dark, lighting must be adequate. If a substantial cash exchange is taking place, security guards should be available to escort the customer.

Personal injury exposure arises from breaches of customers' privacy, confidentiality of their financial records, and the apprehension of suspected robbers. The use of closed-circuit systems prevents such incidents from evolving into a "he said she said" situation. Employees must be trained to handle such situations properly.

Workers compensation exposures are moderate due to the possibility of injury or death of guards, cashiers, and managers during an armed robbery. Cashiers should be separated from customers by barriers such as high counters. Those working with customers at walk-up or drive-in windows should be protected by bulletproof glass enclosures.

As most work is done with the assistance of computers, employees are exposed to eyestrain, neck strain, and repetitive motion including carpal tunnel syndrome. All workstations should be ergonomically designed to reduce the chance of such injuries.

Property exposures are primarily from fire due to the electrical wiring for computers, printers and other electronic office equipment, heating, and air conditioning systems. All wiring must meet current codes, be well maintained, and be adequate for the exchange's operations.

Circuitry on electronic equipment may be easily damaged from smoke, water, and heat, which will cause a total loss even with a small fire. The building and its contents may be damaged during break-ins, robberies, and vandalism.

Appropriate security measures include physical barriers to prevent entrance to the premises after hours and an alarm system that reports directly to a central station or the police department. Extra expense coverage should be considered for the exchange to continue operations after a loss.

Crime exposure is primarily due to employee dishonesty, either from the theft of cash or from the improper transfer of funds held for customers. As money exchanges require a large amount of cash on hand to support operations, money and securities exposure is high from armed robbery and safe burglary.

Money exchanges need a Financial Institutions Bond to cover these exposures. Background checks should be conducted for anyone who handles cash or has access to accounts. There must be regular monitoring and auditing of the books by outside auditors to prevent and identify problems.

All employees must take at least one continuous week of vacation a year. Safes, vaults, theft-proof cashier cages, guards, watchpersons, and alarms are needed to protect money. Money kept in cash drawers should be moved regularly to the safe to prevent a large buildup of cash available to thieves.

Bank drops should be made periodically throughout the day. Large exchanges should be handled only with prior notification. Controls and programming to prevent computer fraud should be reviewed. Extortion is a growing concern due to the high value of assets held by money exchanges.

Inland marine exposure is from computers and other electronic equipment used to track currency rates worldwide and valuable papers and records for customers' and regulatory information. If the exchange is involved in trading on the market, there may be accounts receivable.

Backup copies of all records, including computer records, should be made and stored off premises for ease of restoration in the event of a loss.

Business auto exposure is generally limited to hired and non-owned for employees running errands. If vehicles are provided to employees, policies should be in place for personal and permitted use of the vehicles.

Any driver must have a valid driver's license and acceptable MVR. Vehicles must be well maintained with records kept in a central location.

Currency Exchange Insurance Alaska - The Bottom Line

To protect your company, employees and the people you serve, having the right currency exchange insurance Alaska coverage is vital. To discover types of policy options are available to you, how much coverage you should invest in and the premiums - speak to a reputable commercial insurance broker.

Alaska Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Alaska

If you're an entrepreneur who is thinking about starting a business in Alaska, it's important to have a basic understanding of the state's overall economy before you set up shop. Regardless of how high-quality the products and services you are planning on offering may be, if the location where you open your organization doesn't offer a target market that your products and services will appeal to, chances of success are slim. Furthermore, if a workforce isn't available to support your business, you'll have a hard time staying afloat.

With that said, it's important for business-minded individuals who are thinking about starting a company in Alaska to familiarize themselves with the state's economy; it's also a good idea to have an understanding of the commercial insurance requirements.

Following is an overview of economic trends and commercial insurance policies that business owners are required to carry in The Last Frontier.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Alaska

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in Alaska was 6.1% in December of 2019. While that's significantly higher than the national unemployment rate, which was 3.4% in December, 2019, it's lower than it was one year prior, when the rate of unemployment was 6.5% in December of 2018. Though the workforce is growing slower than it is in other states, economists do predict that the rate will continue to decline in the coming years.

Despite Alaska's remoteness and cold climate, it's actually a great start to start a business. According to the Tax Foundation, Alaska is the second most tax-friendly state for business owners in the United States, as there's no individual income tax or state sales tax. Additionally, Alaska has the second highest rate of new business owners, as well as the second highest percentage of available employees (as per 2016).

As in most states, the best spots to start a business in Alaska are the state's biggest cities and the surrounding areas. This includes Anchorage, Juneau, and Fairbanks. Other key areas that are seeing a boost in business development in recent years include Homer, Sitka, Prudhoe Bay, and Ketchikan.

While there are several industries that are experiencing growth in The Last Frontier, specific sectors thrive more than others. Businesses that are related to the following industries are booming in AK:

  • Fishing, which is also one of the largest contributors to the state's economy.
  • Mining, which provides more than 4,500 jobs in Alaska.
  • Petroleum, which is responsible for 34% of jobs in the state. In fact, Prudhoe Bay is North America's largest oil field.
  • Tourism is the second largest private sector employer in the state. Each year, millions of people from around the globe travel to Alaska to marvel at the numerous natural wonders that can be found here.
Commercial Insurance Requirements In Alaska

The Alaska Division of Insurance regulates insurance in AK. Alaska mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Alaska requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

Alaska also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Financial Institutions Insurance

Discover the types of commercial insurance that banks, finance companies and other financial institutions need to protect their asset management, deposit, lending, investment and other operations.


Financial Institution Insurance

Financial institutions handle, receive, disburse, and invest money of others.

They are subject to regulations specific to their operation but they are also subject to legal and moral obligations for their customers.

Customers entrust their funds to these institutions because of their confidence in the management's ability.

Insurance is a necessary means to protect the financial institutions and their customers against various types of losses.

The financial services offered and the personal relationships created by the institution can only be protected through the use of a sound insurance program and appropriate bonding practices.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Extra Expense, Equipment Breakdown, Financial Institutions Bond, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Directors' and Officers' Liability, Employee Benefits, Fiduciary Liability, Professional, Umbrella, Hired and Non-Owned Auto, Workers Compensation & Surety Bonds.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Buildings, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Computer Fraud, Extortion, Fine Arts, Signs, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices, Law Enforcement Professional, Business Auto Liability and Physical Damage And Stop Gap Liability.


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Also find Alaska insurance agents & brokers and learn about Alaska small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including AK business insurance costs. Call us (907) 531-9001.

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