Oregon Cable Layers Insurance

Or call for your free quote:

Get the best OR small business insurance quotes online & info on cost, coverage, minimum requirements, certificates & more.

Oregon Cable Layers Insurance Policy Information

OR Cable Layers Insurance

Oregon Cable Layers Insurance. As a cable layer, the services you offer are invaluable. Whether fiber optic or coaxial, and whether on land or under the sea, cables are essential telecommunications, electricity, and even for military purposes.

Cable laying contractors install, service, maintain, repair, or replace overhead or underground cables and lines used to provide electricity or communication services including telephone, cable television, and the Internet, both inside and outside of residential and commercial buildings.

The lines may be made of copper or fiber optic covered with heavy-duty plastic sheathing. Operations consist of excavating trenches, laying the cable into the trenches, then filling in the trench with dirt or other materials.

The lines from individual buildings or residences, often already laid by electricians or other contractors, are then hooked up to the system. The contractor may provide 24 hour emergency service.

Homeowners, business owners, health care providers, academic institutions, media organizations; individuals and entities around the world rely on the cables you install every minute of every day in order to function. In other words, as a cable layer, your job is crucial; perhaps more crucial than you even realize.

Despite the imperative nature of your work, and regardless of your hard work and dedication, as with professionals in any field, cable layers face a number of risks. In order to protect yourself from said risks, investing in the right type of commercial insurance is an absolute must.

What type of hazards are cable layers subjected to? What kind of Oregon cable layers insurance coverage should you carry? To find the answers to these questions and more, keep on reading.

Oregon cable layers insurance protects your cable installation business from lawsuits with rates as low as $47/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do OR Cable Layers Need Insurance?

While there's no doubt that cable installation is a high-demand job that can be quite rewarding, it can also be wrought with issues. Handling heavy and awkward spools of cables, climbing poles, digging holes, operating machinery, driving vehicles; these are just some of the tasks that are associated with your job title.

With those tasks come a number of risks, such as accidents, injuries, and even property damages. For instance, you could sustain an injury while climbing a pole or even an electric shock, be involved in a vehicle accident, or damage a client's property.

While there's no doubt that you try your best t adhere to stringent regulations, you consistently go above and beyond to ensure your safety, the safety of those you may work with, and the safety of your surroundings, and you are always try your best to stay alert and aware of your surroundings, something can go wrong when you least expect it.

In the event that things do go awry and you or someone else sustains a serious injury, or property damage occur as a result of a mishap, you could be looking at hefty expenses; bills for any medical care that might be needed or for repairs that may be required, for instance. As you can imagine, such expenses can be exorbitant, and footing the bill yourself could end up putting you in a grave financial situation.

If, however, you have the right Oregon cable layers insurance, if something unexpected does happen, instead of paying for the related expenses out of your own pocket, your insurance carrier will cover said expenses yourself.

To summarize, commercial insurance is the best way to protect yourself from the exorbitant costs and save you from the serious financial hardships that could be associated with unexpected incidents.

What Type Of Insurance Do Oregon Cable Layers Need?

Protecting yourself and your assets from the risks that are associated with the work you do as a cable installer with insurance is an absolute must.

But what kind of Oregon cable layers insurance coverage do you need? While the answer to that question varies from person to person and organization to organization, and depends on several factors, there are some key policies that all cable layers should carry.

A brief overview of these most essential types of Oregon cable layers insurance coverage needed include the following:

  • Commercial Property - With this coverage, the physical structure of the building you operate your business out of, as well as the contents within that physical structure, will be protected. This coverage will help to pay for physical damages that your property may experience, as well as the contents within.
  • Commercial General Liability - This type of policy will help to pay for third-party liability claims that are related to personal injuries or property damages. In the event that a client sustains an injury while visiting your place of business or if you damaged their property while installing their cable, commercial general liability coverage will help to cover those costs.
  • Business Auto - Whether you use company vehicles or your own personal vehicles to operate your business, you'll also want to invest in commercial auto insurance. This policy will help to cover the costs of repairing or replacing work-related vehicles if they are involved in an accident.

The above are just a small handful of the types of Oregon cable layers insurance coverage that should be in force. For more information, speak to a reputable and experience commercial insurance provider.

OR Cable Layers Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposures at the contractor's office are generally limited due to lack of public access.

Outdoor storage of materials and equipment may create vandalism and attractive nuisance hazards. Off-site exposures are extensive. The area of operation should be restricted by barriers and proper signage to protect the public from the hazards of digging and overhead operations. Shutoff and lockout procedures must be in place to make sure the cable or lines are not live.

Digging and other operations can result in cutting utility cable, damaging property of the utility company, and disrupting service to neighboring residences or businesses. Contractors laying underground cables should verify the absence of other utility lines prior to digging. Once a trench is excavated, there must be shoring or other supports to prevent collapse.

If there is work at heights, falling tools or supplies may cause bodily injury or property damage if dropped from ladders and scaffolding. Construction sites create an attractive nuisance hazard, especially if work is close to residential areas. All equipment must be disabled when not in operation to prevent untrained individuals from using it.

Fencing must be in place with appropriate warning signs to prevent trespassing. A significant morale hazard may be indicated by the absence of detailed procedures to determine utility locations and to research prior uses of the land. The use of subcontractors as well as any contractual liability exposures should be examined.

Personal injury exposures include assault and battery and invasion of privacy. Background checks should be conducted for any employee who will have regular contact with customers.

Completed operations exposures can be very high if the cable is not properly installed. Work for medical facilities, prisons, or large manufacturers can present the potential for catastrophic loss if power is shut down. Quality control, including work order documentation, and employee training, background, and experience is important.

Warranties, guarantees, and maintenance agreements, in which the contractor promises to keep a system in operation, should be reviewed. Shoring methods are vital to prevent cave in following excavation, especially if under streets and roads and any structures.

Environmental impairment liability exposures can be high if the contractor is responsible for the disposal of old capacitors as these may contain asbestos, PCPs, or other hazardous materials. Spillage and leaking of pollutants into the air, ground, or water can result in high cleanup costs and fines.

Disposal procedures must adhere to all EPA and other regulatory standards. Proper written procedures and documentation of both the transportation and disposal process are important.

Operations can result in claims of noise or dust pollution by neighboring properties and claims for cumulative structural damage to neighboring foundations from heavy traffic.

Workers compensation exposures can be severe. Lifting and back injuries, hernias, sprains, and strains can occur from setting up retaining walls or trenches, installing cable lines, or working from awkward positions. The collapse of retaining walls or overturn of equipment may result in severe injury or death from crushing or suffocation.

Digging may result in electrocution from underground electrical lines or asphyxiation from ruptured gas lines. If lines are overhead, workers may fall from heights or be hit by falling objects. Hazards increase in the absence of adequate shutoff and lockout procedures to make sure the wiring is not live.

Common hazards include slips and falls, foreign objects in the eye, hearing impairment from noise, cuts or puncture wounds, bites from insects or vermin, temperature extremes, auto accidents during transportation to and from job sites, and exposure to pollutants.

Serious injuries may also arise during work with hand tools, large, heavy machinery, or from the carelessness of fellow employees. The absence of good maintenance, proper use of basic safety equipment, such as properly installed guards, steel-toed shoes, and eye protection, and strict enforcement of safety practices may indicate a morale hazard.

The removal of old capacitors may involve work with PCBs, requiring special training and procedures to be in place.

Property exposures at the cable layer's own location are usually limited to those of an office and storage of materials, equipment, and vehicles. Cable waiting to be installed is bulky. If a fire starts, the smoke is heavy. The blaze could be difficult to extinguish if there is high stockpiling.

Fire hazards may arise from refueling and repair operations due to the storage and use of flammable gasoline and other fuel sources. Copper cable may be targeted by thieves. Appropriate security controls should be taken including alarms, lighting, and physical barriers prohibiting access afterhours.

Inland marine exposures include accounts receivable if the contractor bills customers for services, contractors' equipment, construction materials in transit, installation floater, and valuable papers and records for customers' and suppliers' information. Backup copies of all data should be stored off premises.

Cable and excavation equipment is bulky and can be difficult to transport without adequate loading, tie-down and unloading procedures. The cable may be susceptible to damage by cutting, tearing, or bending. Ground at the construction site may be uneven. Equipment may strike underground objects or utilities, fall into holes or pits, slip or fall into mud, water, or sinkholes, be damaged in rock, land, or mud slides, or burst into fire from overload.

Equipment may be subject to changes in the weather, water hazards, or being struck by other vehicles. Materials and equipment left at job sites may be subject to theft and vandalism. Equipment should be secured and rendered inoperable when not in use. Contractors may lease, rent or borrow equipment, or may lease out, rent or loan their owned equipment to others, which poses additional risk as the operator may be unfamiliar with operation of the borrowed item.

Crime exposures are primarily due to employee dishonesty. Some cable made with copper may have a relatively high value. Partial shipments or unused excess from a job may be diverted, often in collusion with delivery persons.

Background checks should be conducted prior to hiring any employee. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements. Physical inventories should be conducted on a regular basis to prevent employee theft of equipment and supplies.

Commercial exposures can be high due to the transport of heavy equipment and lifting devices for cable laying. Secure tying down is vital to prevent heavy damage to other vehicles. In rural areas, roads may be narrow and the ground uneven, increasing the risk of collision and upset.

The driver of the truck must be trained in handling a top-heavy vehicle as considerable skill and knowledge are required for safe driving. If there is a collision, the resulting overturn may spill the load spill onto a public road and prevent access until cleanup is completed. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs.

Random drug and alcohol testing should be conducted. Vehicles must be maintained, and the records kept in a central location.

Oregon Cable Layers Insurance - The Bottom Line

To learn more about the specific types of Oregon cable layers insurance policies you'll need and how much coverage you should carry, consult with a reputable broker that is experienced in business insurance.

Oregon Business Economic Outlook & Commercial Insurance Regulations

If you are thinking about doing business in the Pacific Northwest, you might have your sights set on Oregon. However, before you set up shop, it's important for you to have an understanding of the economy - so that you can make the best decisions possible. It's also important for you to know what type of business insurance policies you are legally required to carry in order to do business in OR.

Made In Oregon

In order to help set you up for success, below, we highlight some of key information regarding the economy in Oregon, as well as the regulations regarding commercial insurance.

The Economic Outlook In Oregon

In 2018, Oregon is projected to see an increase in their economy. The unemployment rate was 4.1 percent at the end of 2017, and it is expected that it will either stay the same or drop even lower by the end of 2021.

There are several industries that are expected to contribute to the job market and the economy overall in the state of Oregon. The industry that is expected to see the most gain in this state during the 2018 calendar year is construction, with an increase of 10.5 percent. The manufacturing industry is also expected to see significant growth, with a forecasted increase of 4.3 percent. Other industries that are expected to see growth in OR in 2021 include:

  • Financial Services
  • Lodging
  • Mining
  • Trade
  • Transportation
  • Utilities
Insurance Requirements For Oregon Businesses

The Division of Financial Regulation oversees the insurance industry in Oregon. Here workers compensation insurance is mandated. If you employ one or more person, whether that person is full-time or part-time, or is hourly or salaried, you are legally required to carry this type of coverage. Additionally, you must carry commercial auto insurance if you operate vehicle for any business-related purposes, whether it's meeting with clients, making deliveries, or transporting goods.

While commercial general liability insurance is not required in OR, it is highly recommended. This type of coverage will protect you from any lawsuits and the accompanying settlements that may arise in the event that some slips and falls, or claims that you damaged their property. You should also consider investing in commercial property insurance, as it can help to offset the cost of any property losses that you might experience.

Additional Resources For Construction Contractors Insurance

Learn about construction contractors insurance, including how much the premium costs and what is covered - and how business insurance can help protect your construction business from lawsuits.


Construction Contractors Insurance

Construction contractors have substantial needs for many types of insurance coverage. Most would point to the importance of coverage for completed operations, premises liability coverage during construction operations at jobsites and professional or design errors and omissions insurance.

Such coverages can be provided only when the interests of the contractor and of the property owner are understood; particularly the contractual obligations assumed by the contractor. Next in significance is the workers compensation exposure followed by business automobile. Inland marine coverage for expensive mobile equipment, supplies, other tools of the trade and builders' risk can be vital.

Liability coverage is needed by a construction contractor in order to obtain most jobs. In addition, if a contractor wants to stay in business, it must be obtained to protect it from lawsuits due to its premises operations, off-site locations and products/completed operations exposures. Owners and contractors protective liability and railroad protective liability coverages may also be required in certain cases in order for a contractor to meets its obligations for particular jobs.

Many construction contractors do not have the usual location-specific buildings and business personal property exposures. Their business property is more mobile and, therefore, better covered with inland marine coverage forms. However, for those larger construction contractors that own buildings and/or maintain business inventory there are many coverage forms and choices available to them.

Construction contractors use their vehicles to get to and from their workplaces and jobsites. They also use vehicles to transport equipment and inventory to those locations. It is important to cover the liability of these vehicles for injury or damage they may cause, as well as to provide coverage for damage to the vehicles themselves.

Employers are required to provide coverage for injuries sustained by their employees while on the job. Construction contractors must comply with these requirements but some try to avoid them by hiring subcontractors. These subcontractors may actually operate and qualify as employees. The relationship between a contractor and its subcontractors must be carefully evaluated in order to determine if workers compensation coverage is still needed.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Surety Bonds, Accounts Receivable, Builders' Risk, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Nonowned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Contractors' Equipment, Goods in Transit, Installation Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Environmental Impairment Liability, Stop Gap Liability, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) (Drones).


Request a free Oregon Cable Layers insurance quote in Albany, Ashland, Astoria, Aumsville, Baker, Bandon, Beaverton, Bend, Boardman, Brookings, Burns, Canby, Carlton, Central Point, Coos Bay, Coquille, Cornelius, Corvallis, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dallas, Damascus, Dayton, Dundee, Eagle Point, Estacada, Eugene, Fairview, Florence, Forest Grove, Gervais, Gladstone, Gold Beach, Grants Pass, Gresham, Happy Valley, Harrisburg, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Hubbard, Independence, Jacksonville, Jefferson, Junction, Keizer, King, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Lafayette, Lake Oswego, Lakeview town, Lebanon, Lincoln, Madras, McMinnville, Medford, Milton-Freewater, Milwaukie, Molalla, Monmouth, Mount Angel, Myrtle Creek, Myrtle Point, Newberg, Newport, North Bend, Nyssa, Oakridge, Ontario, Oregon, Pendleton, Philomath, Phoenix, Portland, Prineville, Redmond, Reedsport, Rogue River, Roseburg, Salem, Sandy, Scappoose, Seaside, Shady Cove, Sheridan, Sherwood, Silverton, Sisters, Springfield, St. Helens, Stanfield, Stayton, Sublimity, Sutherlin, Sweet Home, Talent, The Dalles, Tigard, Tillamook, Toledo, Troutdale, Tualatin, Umatilla, Union, Veneta, Vernonia, Waldport, Warrenton, West Linn, Willamina, Wilsonville, Winston, Wood Village, Woodburn and all other OR cities & Oregon counties near me in The Beaver State.

Also find Oregon insurance agents & brokers and learn about Oregon small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including OR business insurance costs. Call us (503) 610-0300.

Free Business Insurance Quote Click Here