Foundation Layers Insurance South Carolina

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Foundation Layers Insurance South Carolina Policy Information

SC Foundation Layers Insurance

Foundation Layers Insurance South Carolina. A foundation is one of the most critical components of any type of structure. It's the very surface that every other element of a building lies on; the floor, the walls, and the roof. Without a foundation, a building would be structurally unsound. Needless to say, as a SC foundation layer, the work that you do exceedingly important.

Foundation layers dig into the ground to clear and level the ground on which a solid base will be erected for buildings or structures. Before the digging, the soil and rock are analyzed so the foundation will support the weight of the structure. The foundation can be shallow or deep and be made of block, brick, stone, or treated wood, or by pouring wet concrete into wooden or metal forms. The contractor may also do repair work such as underpinning.

Repair only contractors are sometimes referred to as basement contractors. A foundation may simply consist of a poured concrete slab without a basement. A foundation may extend several feet above ground over a crawl space and consist of walls or piles (columns) below grade (ground level) resting on footings, with the space between the walls filled with earth. The most elaborate foundation includes one or more basements, including footings, walls, and perhaps interior supports, with a finished floor or an unfinished floor made of packed dirt.

Like any business owner, there are a number of risks that are associated with operating a company that specializes in laying foundation. Members of your staff can sustain injuries, clients' property can be damaged, your property could be damaged, and any other number of incidents can arise. When they do, you'll be thankful that you have the right type of foundation layers insurance South Carolina coverage.

Foundation layers insurance South Carolina protects your contracting business from lawsuits with rates as low as $87/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Foundation Layers Need Insurance?

You work hard to make sure that you provide exceptional services. You are also diligent about the operations of your business, making every effort to ensure everything is running smoothly and properly. You stay current with the latest trends in foundation laying, work with the highest quality machinery, make sure that your staff is properly trained, and ensure that all safety protocol is being followed, for example. However, despite your efforts to make sure that everything is functioning properly, there is always a chance that something can go wrong.

A piece of equipment could malfunction and injure an employee; an error could occur while laying a foundation; a client could claim that you damaged their property. These are just some of the instances that could occur. When something goes awry, you will be held legally responsible. As such, you'll have to pay for any damages that occur; not to mention legal defense fees and settlement fees, should a third-party or employee take legal action. These expenses can be astronomically expensive, and could potentially lead to bankruptcy.

If you have the right type of insurance coverage, you won't have to pay for these types of expenses yourself; instead, your foundation layers insurance South Carolina carrier will cover the cost. In other words, insurance can protect you from significant expenses that would otherwise be financially devastating.

What Type Of Insurance Do Foundation Layers Need?

As a SC foundation layer, the type of insurance coverage you need depends on a variety of factors; where you're business is located, the size of your operation, the number of employees on your staff, and the type of clients you work with, for example. A reputable insurance agent will be able to help you determine exactly what type of foundation layers insurance South Carolina you need and how much coverage you should carry.

With that said, there are certain types of policies that all foundation layers should carry, including:

  • Commercial General Liability - This type of coverage offers protection against third-party claims, including property damage and injuries. If a client claims you damaged their property and takes legal action, your policy will cover the cost of repairs, as well as legal fees.
  • Commercial Property - You'll also want to invest in commercial property insurance, which will protect the building you operate your business from, as well as the contents within it. For instance, if a fire occurs, your policy will help to pay for anything that's lost or damaged.
  • Inland Marine - Any equipment that you transport between job sites will need to be covered by inland marine insurance. If your cement mixer is vandalized while it's at a job site, this policy will help to pay for the damages.
  • Business Auto - You'll also want to invest in commercial auto insurance to protect any vehicles that you use for work-related purposes. If you or an employee is involved in an accident, this policy will cover the damages.
  • Workers Compensation - To protect your employees from work-related injuries or illnesses that they may sustain, workers' comp is a must. This coverage will pay for any necessary medical care, as well as lost wages. It can also pay for litigation, should an employee file a lawsuit.

The above are just a few examples of the different types of insurance coverage foundation layers should carry. You can certainly invest in individual policies; however, you should consider looking into a comprehensive policy that is specifically designed for foundation layers. This type of foundation layers insurance South Carolina policy will offer all of the coverage you need in one plan, and it may even offer you discounted rates.

South Carolina Foundation Layer's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is low at the contractor's premises since visitor access is limited, but equipment stored in the open may present an attractive nuisance to children. At job sites, the operation of heavy machinery and asphalt plants presents numerous hazards, especially if the contractor exercises inadequate control of the area.

The public and employees of other contractors can be injured due to trips and falls over debris, equipment, or uneven ground. Once a hole is excavated, there must be shoring or other supports to prevent collapse if people are to work in the hole. Digging can result in cutting utility cable, damaging property of the utility company and disrupting service to neighboring residences or businesses. A significant morale hazard may be indicated by the absence of detailed procedures to determine utility locations and to research prior uses of the land. The weight of large mixers and mix-in-transit vehicles can cause serious injury or property damage.

Hazards increase significantly in the absence of jobsite control, including spotters, signage, and barriers where appropriate. After hours, wet cement attracts children and vandals. At the job site, the contractor is responsible for the safety aspects of the entire project even after hours when there is no construction activity as construction sites create an attractive nuisance hazard, especially if work is close to residential areas.

All equipment must be disabled when not in operation to prevent untrained individuals from using it. Safety barriers such as perimeter fencing may be needed if the excavation work is complete but other construction has not yet started. Excavating in an area of existing structures requires extra vigilance to prevent foundation and structural damage to nearby buildings.

Completed operations liability exposures can be very high due to the potential for bodily injury and property damage that can occur from collapse due to improper installation and curing. Concrete may crack, rapidly deteriorate, or otherwise fail. The mixture of the cement and concrete and the materials used to harden and cure must meet all specifications. Quality control and full compliance with all construction, material, and design specifications is necessary, as is documentation of customer specifications, work orders, change orders, and inspection and written acceptance by the customer.

Environmental impairment liability exposures may arise from the waste generated in the fueling and cleaning of heavy equipment. Spills must be controlled and equipment monitored at all times. Allowing waste to accumulate either at the job site or in the contractor's yard could cause a severe environmental impairment situation. The insured must use safe methods to collect, transport, and dispose of the waste. Operations can result in claims of noise or dust pollution by neighboring properties and claims for cumulative structural damage to neighboring foundations from heavy traffic.

Workers compensation exposures can be very high. Lifting and back injuries, hernias, sprains, strains and crush injuries may arise from the clearing and excavation of the site, to the laying of the bricks, stone, blocks, or forms, to pouring of concrete, to the drying or curing and completion of the final project. Collapse of retaining walls, mudslides or landslides, sinkholes, or overturn of equipment may result in severe injury or death from crushing or suffocation.

Digging and grading of land may result in injury from underground electrical cable or gas lines. Common hazards include slips and falls, being struck by falling objects, and foreign objects in the eye, hearing impairment from noise, cuts, or puncture wounds, and bites from insects or vermin. As operations are often conducted in remote areas, it may be difficult to transport an injured worker to a medical facility to receive prompt treatment. Fine sand from the concrete mixture may cause eye injuries or even lung disease such as silicosis.

Pouring concrete from a mixer usually involves operations on top of the vehicle; the absence of proper guarding may significantly increase the exposure to loss. The absence of good maintenance, proper use of basic safety equipment, such as properly installed guards, steel-toed shoes, and eye protection, and strict enforcement of safety practices may indicate a morale hazard.

Property exposures at the contractor's own location are generally limited to an office and storage of material, equipment, and vehicles. The contractor's yard may store large mixing or batch plants to combine the ingredients for mixing cement or concrete and for loading them into trucks. If repair work on vehicles and equipment is done in the building, fire hazards may be high. If equipment and supplies are stored in the yard, they may be damaged by wind, vandalism, and theft. Adequate fencing and lighting should be in place to deter trespassers.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty. Background checks should be conducted prior to hiring any employee. All ordering, billing and disbursements must be handled as separate job duties and regularly audited. Physical inventories should be conducted on a regular basis to prevent employee theft of equipment.

Inland marine exposure is from accounts receivable if the contractor bills customers for services, contractors' equipment, construction materials in transit, installation floater, and valuable papers and records for customers' and vendors' information as well as custom project plans. Construction equipment and concrete mixed in transit are heavy and difficult to transport. The training of drivers and haulers, especially with respect to loading, tie-down, and unloading, is important to avoid damage to bulky equipment due to overturn or collision.

At the job site, hazards come from uneven terrain, from the abrasive or caustic nature of some of the materials, or from the sheer weight of the concrete as it may exceed the equipment's load capacity. Tools and equipment may strike underground objects or utility lines, fall into holes or pits, slip or fall into mud, water, or sinkholes, be damaged by rock, land, or mud slides, or burst into fire due to overload. They may be damaged by changes in the weather, water hazards, drops, or falls from heights, or being struck by other vehicles. The concrete forms lack identifying marks and must often be left overnight or longer at a site, increasing the exposure to vandalism and theft.

Materials and equipment left at job sites may be stolen or vandalized. Equipment should be secured and rendered inoperable when not in use. If the insured does guniting of foundation piles, the pressurized application should be well controlled. (Gunite is a protective cement and coating sprayed over wire mesh onto piles.) Copies of all records should be kept at an offsite location for easier restoration.

Commercial auto exposures can be very high. Since mix-in-transit units are among the heaviest on the road, they can cause severe bodily injury or property damage even in apparently minor collisions. These units are awkward to handle while driving or in operation, and are difficult to tow if they overturn or become stuck in mud. Roads in rural areas may be narrow and the ground uneven, increasing the risk of collision and upset.

The driver of the truck must be trained in handling a top-heavy vehicle as considerable skill and knowledge is required for safe driving. If there is a collision, the resulting overturn may spill the load spill onto a public road and preventing access until clean up is completed. All drivers must have appropriate licenses and acceptable MVRs. Vehicles must be maintained and the records kept in a central location.

Foundation Layers Insurance - The Bottom Line

To find out more about foundation layers insurance South Carolina, how much coverage you should carry, and how much this type of policy will cost, consult with a broker that specializes in contractors insurance.

South Carolina Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In South Carolina

If you are an entrepreneur and you are either thinking about starting a new business or you are considering expanding an existing company to a new location, you know how important it is to choose the right area for your operation. In order to achieve as much success as possible, the location must offer favorable conditions and a market that will benefit from your products and services, and that those products and services will appeal to.

There are several aspects that indicate whether or not a specific state offers favorable conditions for business operations. Two of the most crucial aspects include the unemployment rate of the state, as well as the industries that are seeing the most activity in the state.

Additionally, it's also vital for prospective business owners to be aware of the different types of commercial insurance policies they will need to carry within a particular state to ensure that they are properly covered and complaint with the law.

If you're thinking about conducting business operations in South Carolina, read on for an overview of the economic trends and commercial insurance requirements in the Palmetto State.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In South Carolina

Unemployment rate is a telltale indicator of the economy of a state. The lower the rate, the healthier the economy is, and in turn, the more opportunities there are for businesses. As per the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in the state of South Carolina was 2.3% in December, 2019.

Compared to the national average of 3.5% during the same time period, the economy of SC is booming. The health of the economy is further illustrated by the steady decline in the state's unemployment rate, which was 3.4% in July, 2019 and fell steadily until reaching the above-mentioned 2.3% in the last month of the year.

As in most states, large metropolitan areas are the best places to start a business in South Carolina; however, there are also several smaller cities and suburban locals that are also seeing an uptick in business ventures. Some of the destinations that companies might consider include:

  • Beaufort
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Fort Mill
  • Georgetown
  • Greenville
  • Greer
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Mauldin
  • Myrtle Beach

The industries that are seeing the most activity in SC include:

  • Aerospace and aviation
  • Alternative energy
  • Automotive manufacturing
  • Biotechnology and life sciences
  • Hospitality and tourism
  • Logistics, transportation, and distribution
  • Recycling
Commercial Insurance Requirements In South Carolina

The South Carolina Department of Insurance regulates insurance in SC. South Carolina mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

South Carolina requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire four or more employees on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

South Carolina also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Construction Contractors Insurance

Learn about construction contractors insurance, including how much the premium costs and what is covered - and how business insurance can help protect your construction business from lawsuits.


Construction Contractors Insurance

Construction contractors have substantial needs for many types of insurance coverage. Most would point to the importance of coverage for completed operations, premises liability coverage during construction operations at jobsites and professional or design errors and omissions insurance.

Such coverages can be provided only when the interests of the contractor and of the property owner are understood; particularly the contractual obligations assumed by the contractor. Next in significance is the workers compensation exposure followed by business automobile. Inland marine coverage for expensive mobile equipment, supplies, other tools of the trade and builders' risk can be vital.

Liability coverage is needed by a construction contractor in order to obtain most jobs. In addition, if a contractor wants to stay in business, it must be obtained to protect it from lawsuits due to its premises operations, off-site locations and products/completed operations exposures. Owners and contractors protective liability and railroad protective liability coverages may also be required in certain cases in order for a contractor to meets its obligations for particular jobs.

Many construction contractors do not have the usual location-specific buildings and business personal property exposures. Their business property is more mobile and, therefore, better covered with inland marine coverage forms. However, for those larger construction contractors that own buildings and/or maintain business inventory there are many coverage forms and choices available to them.

Construction contractors use their vehicles to get to and from their workplaces and jobsites. They also use vehicles to transport equipment and inventory to those locations. It is important to cover the liability of these vehicles for injury or damage they may cause, as well as to provide coverage for damage to the vehicles themselves.

Employers are required to provide coverage for injuries sustained by their employees while on the job. Construction contractors must comply with these requirements but some try to avoid them by hiring subcontractors. These subcontractors may actually operate and qualify as employees. The relationship between a contractor and its subcontractors must be carefully evaluated in order to determine if workers compensation coverage is still needed.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Surety Bonds, Accounts Receivable, Builders' Risk, Computers, Valuable Papers and Records, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Nonowned Auto Liability & Workers Compensation.

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Business Income with Extra Expense, Earthquake, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Contractors' Equipment, Goods in Transit, Installation Floater, Cyber Liability, Employment-related Practices Liability, Environmental Impairment Liability, Stop Gap Liability, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) (Drones).


Request a free Foundation Layers Insurance South Carolina quote in Abbeville, Aiken, Anderson, Batesburg-Leesville, Beaufort, Belvedere, Bennettsville, Berea, Bluffton, Boiling Springs, Burton, Camden, Cayce, Centerville, Central, Charleston, Cheraw, Chester, Clemson, Clinton, Clover, Columbia, Conway, Darlington, Dentsville, Dillon, Easley, Edgefield, Five Forks, Florence, Forest Acres, Forestbrook, Fort Mill, Fountain Inn, Gaffney, Gantt, Garden City, Georgetown, Goose Creek, Greenville, Greenwood, Greer, Hanahan, Hardeeville, Hartsville, Hilton Head Island, Hollywood, Homeland Park, Irmo, James Island, Ladson, Lake City, Lake Murray of Richland, Lake Wylie, Lancaster, Laurel Bay, Laurens, Lexington, Little River, Lugoff, Marion, Mauldin, Moncks Corner, Mount Pleasant, Murrells Inlet, Myrtle Beach, Newberry, North Augusta, North Charleston, North Myrtle Beach, Oak Grove, Orangeburg, Parker, Piedmont, Port Royal, Powdersville, Red Bank, Red Hill, Rock Hill, Sangaree, Sans Souci, Seneca, Seven Oaks, Simpsonville, Socastee, Spartanburg, St. Andrews, Summerville, Sumter, Taylors, Tega Cay, Travelers Rest, Union, Valley Falls, Wade Hampton, Walterboro, Welcome, West Columbia, Woodfield, York and all other cities near me in SC - The Palmetto State.

Also find South Carolina insurance agents & brokers and learn about South Carolina small business insurance requirements for general liability, business property, commercial auto & workers compensation including SC business insurance costs. Call us (803) 500-9096.

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