Washington DC Importer And Exporter Insurance

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Washington DC Importer And Exporter Insurance Policy Information

DC Importer And Exporter Insurance

Washington DC Importer And Exporter Insurance. Do you own a business that imports and/or exports products within the United States or to and from other countries?

Exporters arrange the sale of goods produced within the United States to other countries. Importers make arrangements to sell foreign-made goods to United States consumers. They may work solely with one manufacturer or with several.

They do not take physical possession of the goods, which can include any item made for individual or commercial consumers, from small novelty items to motor vehicles.

If so, no matter what industry you're in and what type of goods you handle, just like any other business, you need to make sure that you're properly protected. What's the best way to do that? By ensuring that you have the proper Washington DC importer and exporter insurance coverage.

Why do DC importers and exporters need commercial insurance? What type of business insurance coverage do you need? Read on to find out the answers to these questions and more.

Washington DC importer and exporter insurance protects your trading company from lawsuits with rates as low as $57/mo. Get a fast quote and your certificate of insurance now.

Why Do Importers And Exporters Need Insurance?

Clothing, electronics, literature, vehicles, sporting equipment, food; business owner's import and export all types of products, both domestically and internationally. When it comes to handling products, no matter how many precautions you take, there's always a chance that something could go wrong.

For instance, an entire shipment could become lost in transit or part of a shipment could become damaged, your goods could potentially damage somebody else's property, or an employee or third-party could become injured while moving the products you are importing or exporting.

As the owner and operator of your business, you are liable for anything that goes wrong. The cost of replacing products that are damaged in transit, repairing damaged property, or covering someone's medical expenses can be exorbitant.

That's why it's so important to invest in the right type of Washington DC importer and exporter insurance coverage.

If you aren't insured and any of the above-mentioned hypothetical situations were to occur, you would have to cover the related expenses out of your own pocket. The cost of replacing an entire shipment or repairing someone's property could cost 10s of thousands of dollars, if not more. If you had to pay those types of expenses on your own, there's a chance that your business could experience serious financial hardship.

If, however, you were to experience any of the above-mentioned hypothetical situations and you were properly insured, your carrier - not you - would pay for the related expenses. In other words, having the right type of insurance coverage can help you avoid serious monetary losses.

In addition to the financial protection that Washington DC importer and exporter insurance provides, having the appropriate coverage also ensures that your business is in compliance with the law. In most locations, insurance is a legal requirement for importers and exporters. As such, if you aren't properly insured, you could end up facing serious fines or even lose your business.

What Type Of Insurance Do Importers And Exporters Need?

There are several types of insurance coverage business owners who import and/or export products should carry. The specific types of coverage you will need to carry depend on a number of factors, including where your operations are located, where you import products from and export products to, and the size of your business; among other things.

With that said, however, the following are examples of Washington DC importer and exporter insurance policies that all importers and exporters should carry:

  • Cargo Insurance: There are two types of cargo insurance: land and marine. The type you'll need depends on how your products are imported or exported. If you're products are shipped via land transportations, such as trucks or other utility vehicles, you'll need to carry land cargo coverage and if your products are shipped via sea or air, you'll need marine cargo coverage. Both types of cargo insurance protect goods from any damage, theft, or other losses that may occur while they are in transit.
  • Commercial General Liability: This coverage protects you from third-party injury and property damage claims. For instance, if a vendor were to trip and fall while making a delivery to your warehouse, this insurance would cover the cost of any necessary medical care and legal expenses that you may incur.
  • Commercial Property: This policy will protect the properties that are used for business-related purposes - a retail store or a warehouse, for example - from losses that are associated with acts of nature, theft, or vandalism.
  • Workers' Compensation: If any of your employees suffer work-related injuries or illnesses, this policy will cover their medical expenses and provide them with compensation for missed wages if they are unable to work.

These are just a few examples of the type of coverage that DC importers and exporters should carry, you might need more based on your specific operations.

DC Importer's & Exporter's Risks & Exposures

Premises liability exposure is limited to that of an office with very limited public access. There may be considerable international exposure if the owner and/or employees are in other countries for a significant length of time meeting with clients. An international liability policy may be required to adequately protect the firm for actions outside the United States.

Products liability exposure is very high for both exporters and importers of foreign goods. If products are from foreign manufacturers, liability may be increased to that of a manufacturer, particularly if the manufacturer does not have a U.S. policy.

An exporter or importer may need an international products liability policy to provide adequate coverage. The importer or exporter should request copies of policies from each manufacturer with whom they do business to determine the extent of coverage provided.

Hazards depend on the type of products sold, the warranties, advertising, commitments, and promises made by the importer or exporter.

Workers compensation exposure is generally limited to office and travel hazards. When work is done on computers, employees are exposed to eyestrain, neck strain, and repetitive motion injuries including carpal tunnel syndrome. All workstations should be ergonomically designed.

Cleaning workers can develop respiratory ailments or contact dermatitis from working with chemicals. Salespersons can be injured on the road, while flying, or while making calls overseas. Foreign voluntary workers compensation may be needed if out-of-country travel is more than incidental.

Property exposures are minimal if the importer/exporter acts only as a commission merchant and takes no physical possession of the product. Generally, there is an office and some salespersons' samples. Ignition sources would be limited to electrical wiring, heating and air conditioning systems.

Inland marine exposure is from accounts receivable if the importer or exporter offers credit to customers, computers for tracking sales, salespersons' samples for goods used in product demonstrations, and valuable papers and records for manufacturers' and customers' information.

Although the importer or exporter may arrange for shipment, they will not take possession of the goods, so they have no goods in transit exposure.

Crime exposure is from employee dishonesty. Background checks, including criminal history, should be performed on all employees handling money. There must be a separation of duties between persons handling deposits and disbursements and reconciling bank statements. Regular audits, both internal and external, are important to prevent employee theft of accounts.

Since international banking can be involved, the audit of the books should be more extensive due to the opportunity for unusual transactions or diversions, including offshore banking.

Commercial auto exposure is moderate for the salespersons' fleet. There should be a written policy on personal and permissive use of any vehicles provided to employees. MVRs must be ordered on a regular basis. Vehicles must be well maintained with records kept at a central location.

Importer And Exporter Insurance - The Bottom Line

To find out exactly what type of Washington DC importer and exporter insurance coverage you need, speak with an experienced agent that specializes in commercial insurance.

Made In Washington D.C. Economic Data, Regulations And Limits On Commercial Insurance

Made In Washington D.C.

Whether you have a great idea for a business and you're considering your first startup company or you are already operating a business and you're looking to expand, the location of your operations is one of the most important factors you'll need to consider. In order for a business to achieve success, it must be situated in an area that offers a healthy economy and a market that your products and/or services will appeal to.

The unemployment rate of a region paints a picture of the area's economy. A lower unemployment rate indicates that the area has a healthy business climate that can sustain the residents of the region. In addition, it's important for prospective proprietors to find out which industries are thriving in the area they're considering for their operations.

Furthermore, business owners must take into consideration what type of commercial insurance policies they will need to carry in order to protect themselves, those who interact with them, and to ensure that they are compliant with the law.

If you're considering Washington, D.C. for your business, below, we provide an overview of the above-mentioned information so you can determine if the nation's capital offers favorable conditions for success.

Economic Trends For Business Owners In Washington D.C.

In December of 2019, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the unemployment rate in Washington, D.C. was 5.3%. While that rate is considerably higher than what the national average of 3.5% at the same time, the rate had fallen throughout the course of the year.

For example, in July of 2019, the unemployment rate was 5.6%, in August it was 5.5%, and in October, it was 5.4%. This steady decline indicates that more employment opportunities as a result of a healthy business climate have become and are becoming available in D.C.

Washington, D.C. is divided into four specific quadrants, including NE, NW, SE, and SW. While all regions are considered suitable for businesses, those that are situated in commercial areas - Northwest, Southwest, and Southeast - as opposed to Northeast, which is primarily residential, are likely to offer the best opportunities for prospective business owners.

There are several industries that are experiencing growth in D.C. Not surprisingly, government-related sectors and businesses that provide services for the government are seeing the most growth. Additionally, leisure, hospitality, and tourism are also prime industries in the nation's capital, as the region attracts millions of tourists from around the globe. Construction, education, and health round out the top industries in the region.

Commercial Insurance Requirements In Washington D.C.

The Washington D.C. Department of Insurance, Securities and Banking regulates insurance in DC. Washington D.C. mandates very few forms of insurance coverage by law. They enforce worker's compensation.

Washington D.C. requires you to have worker's compensation insurance if you hire even one employee on a regular basis. This includes part-time employees, family members, minors, and immigrant employees. It is not required for independent contractors or domestic employees, though you should check to make sure any contractors you have are true contractors, and not employees.

Washington D.C. also requires all business-owned vehicles to be covered by commercial auto insurance. Other types of business insurance that business owners should carry depend on the specific industry.

Additional Resources For Manufacturing Insurance

Read informative articles on wholesale distribution insurance. Distributors and wholesalers face specific risks including fire, flood and weather damage that can destroy products in the distribution center - and every part of the supply chain including late supplier shipments to unpaid invoices - can effect the entire operation.


Distribution Wholesaler Insurance

Wholesale and distribution operations have many of the same physical damage and property coverage concerns as warehouse operations. In both, the value of both real property and stocks of merchandise is very high. Loss control and other techniques appropriate to the types of merchandise involved are needed. For these reasons, adequate and appropriate property insurance coverages are important.

Managing inventories, equipment and facilities can expose your wholesale distribution operations to some specific and unique risks.

The commercial auto exposure can also be significant, based on the extent of merchandise delivery. In addition, transportation or motor truck cargo insurance on the merchandise must also be arranged.

Employee theft is always an issue and can be a significant exposure, depending on the type of property involved. Finally, the types of merchandise and material handled makes workers compensation insurance another very important coverage.

Minimum recommended small business insurance coverage: Business Personal Property, Business Income and Extra Expense, Accounts Receivable, Computers, Contractors' Equipment, Goods in Transit, Valuable Papers and Records, Employee Dishonesty, General Liability, Employee Benefits, Umbrella, Business Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-owned Auto & Workers Compensation

Other commercial insurance policies to consider: Building, Earthquake, Equipment Breakdown, Flood, Leasehold Interest, Real Property Legal Liability, Signs, Computer Fraud, Forgery, Money and Securities, Cyberliability, Employment-Related Practices and Stop Gap Liability.


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